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RedHat Goes PaaS With Linux

June 30, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

Red Hat has announced the release of OpenShift Enterprise (OSE) 3, a new version of its Platform-as-a-Service offering.

Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)7, Openshift is built on Docker Linux containers with Kubernetes orchestration using technology developed in collaboration with Google.

The news comes in a busy week for Red Hat, which has also announced a new productivity tie-up with Samsung and taken a leading role in the formation of a new alliance known as the Open Container Project to standardise containers.

Users will have access to a wide range of apps via the Red Hat Container Certification Programme. Middleware solutions including Red Hat JBoss Enterprise, Web Server (Tomcat) and JBoss A-MQ messaging are also included.

Included are a number of tools to help developers create and collaborate, with web, command line, and integrated development environment interfaces. Options include direct code-push from GIT and source to image building. There is also flexibility for deployment, rollback and integration.

In addition, a preview of Openshift Dedicated has been released. The public cloud service based on OpenShift 3 will succeed Openshift Online, which already hosts 2.5 million applications online, allowing businesses to quickly build, launch and deploy bespoke apps.

Ashesh Badani, vice president and general manager, OpenShift, Red Hat, said, “This release of OpenShift Enterprise 3 employs open source containers and orchestration practices to change the developer experience and move the platform in the direction of what customers are asking for – a flexible platform for a microservices architecture.

“Our continued upstream work in the Docker and Kubernetes communities enable us to deliver the most updated technology platform for developers and operators, enabling them to remain competitive through quicker innovation.”

To assist users, Red Hat is offering a range of enterprise administrator courses to teach users how to deploy, configure and manage the system, which can result in a Red Hat Certificate of Expertise in Platform as a Service – a worthy certificate for any office wall.

OpenShift 3 is available now with bespoke pricing models based of socket and core pairings.

Courtesy-TheInq

 

Samsung To Stop Disabling Windows Updates On PCs, Tablets

June 29, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Computing

Samsung agreed to stop disabling Windows Update on its PCs and tablets, bowing to a chorus of complaints — including Microsoft’s — that it had interfered with the way users intended the patch service to work on their devices.

“We will be issuing a patch through the Samsung Software Update notification process to revert back to the recommended automatic Windows Update settings within a few days,” a Samsung spokesperson said in an emailed statement Friday afternoon.

Samsung’s pledge put an apparent end to the week’s kerfuffle, which began when Patrick Barker, a crash-debugging and reverse-engineering expert, and a Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional), charged the Korean company with silently changing how Windows Update delivers bug fixes and security patches to customers.

Samsung’s own SW Update — a tool used to update its branded personal computers and tablets with new drivers and refresh third-party, pre-installed software — changed Windows Update’s settings to prevent it from automatically downloading and installing updates, the default setting that Microsoft recommends. Instead, SW Update switched the setting to “Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them.”

Microsoft didn’t care for that one bit. “We do not recommend disabling or modifying Windows Update in any way as this could expose a customer to increased security risks,” the company said Wednesday. “We are in contact with Samsung to address this issue.”

Samsung first said it was, like Microsoft, looking into Barker’s findings, but subsequently denied that it had blocked a Windows 8.1 update — a red herring, since that had never been alleged — and at the same time admitted it manipulated Windows Update.

By Friday, whatever conversations occurred between Microsoft and Samsung made the latter change its mind on messing with the former’s patch service. “Samsung has a commitment to security and we continue to value our partnership with Microsoft,” the Samsung statement read.

 

 

 

 

NASA, Microsoft Team Up On Holographic Glasses

June 29, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

The International Space Station is going to feel a little bit more like Star Trek.

NASA announced that it is collaborating with Microsoft to enable astronauts onboard the orbiting space station to use the company’s virtual reality headset.

Two pairs of Microsoft’s HoloLens computerized eyeglasses are scheduled to be sent to the space station when SpaceX launches its seventh commercial resupply mission on June 28.

“HoloLens and other virtual and mixed reality devices are cutting edge technologies that could help drive future exploration and provide new capabilities to the men and women conducting critical science on the International Space Station,” Sam Scimemi, NASA’s director of the space station program, said in a statement. “This new technology could also empower future explorers requiring greater autonomy on the journey to Mars.”

Microsoft unveiled HoloLens in January at a Windows 10 event where CEO Satya Nadella said the device will be the world’s first holographic computing platform. The device is designed to allow users to see high-definition holograms with surround sound. They’re also built to understand voice commands and hand gestures.

The project that NASA and Microsoft are teaming up on has been dubbed Sidekick and is focused on helping astronauts who need to perform various tasks off-Earth.

By using HoloLens, which look much like a pair of wrap-around sunglasses and are expected to ship on July 29 along with Windows 10, the astronauts should be able to perform some on-station tasks with less training and be more efficient in the work they’re doing.

NASA already has tested the devices on board NASA’s Weightless Wonder C9 jet to make sure they work as expected in gravity-free environment.

 

 

 

IBM Partners With Box

June 29, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

IBM and BOX have signed a global agreement to combine their strengths into a cloud powerhouse.

The star-crossed ones said in a joint statement: “The integration of IBM and Box technologies, combined with our global cloud capabilities and the ability to enrich content with analytics, will help unlock actionable insights for use across the enterprise.”

Box will bring its collaboration and productivity tools to the party, while IBM brings social, analytic, infrastructure and security services.

The move is described as a strategic alliance and will see the two companies jointly market products under a co-banner.

IBM will enable the use of Box APIs in enterprise apps and web services to make a whole new playground for developers.

The deal will see Box integrate IBM’s content management, including content capture, extraction, analytics, case management and governance. Also aboard will be Watson Analytics to study in depth the content being stored in Box.

Box will also be integrated into IBM Verse and IBM Connections to allow full integration for email and social.

IBM’s security and consulting services will be part of the deal, and the companies will work together to create mobile apps for industries under the IBM MobileFirst programme.

Finally, the APIs for Box will be enabled in Bluemix meaning that anyone working on rich apps in the cloud can make Box a part of their creation.

Box seems to be the Nick Clegg to IBM’s ham-faced posh-boy robot in this relationship, but is in fact bringing more than you’d think to the party with innovations delivered by its acquisition of 3D modelling company Verold.

What’s more, the results of these collaborations should allow another major player to join Microsoft and Google in the wars over productivity platforms.

It was announced today that Red Hat and Samsung are forming their own coalition to bring enterprise mobile out of the hands of the likes of IBM and Apple which already have a cool thing going on with MobileFirst.

Courtesy-TheInq

Microsoft Officially Releases Office Apps For Android

June 26, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

Microsoft officially released its Office apps for Android, publishing the final versions of Excel, PowerPoint and Word to Google Play.

The three apps are free for consumers, who may use them only for non-commercial purposes; in other words, not for work- or business-related tasks.

Microsoft kicked off previews last month, wrapping up the release of the suite’s apps for the OSes maintained by rivals Google (Android) and Apple (iOS). The gradual rollout began in March 2014 with the surprise debut of Office on the iPad less than two months after Satya Nadella replaced Steve Ballmer as CEO.

Previously, Microsoft released betas of Office for Windows 10 Mobile — the operating system that will launch before the end of this year for smartphones and smaller tablets — and for Windows 10 on desktops, 2-in-1s and larger tablets. Neither of those collections have been completed.

Microsoft’s change in tenor and pivot in strategy have been clearest over the last 17 months as it crafted and then released touch-based Office apps for every major operating system except Windows, turning a decades-long practice of protecting its own OS on its head.

As with the Office apps on other devices, Excel, PowerPoint and Word on Android can be used by consumers free of charge for basic tasks, including viewing, creating and editing documents. A Microsoft Account — the credentials used to access Microsoft’s services, such as Outlook.com and Skype — is required for all but viewing documents, and on larger Android devices, for everything but viewing and printing.

Business customers and anyone who wants to utilize advanced features, however, require a current Office 365 subscription.

 

 

 

Microsoft To Tweak Windows 10 Preview Program

June 23, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Computing

Microsoft announced that it would soon tweak the Windows 10 preview program as its engineers push toward the July 29 launch of the final code to customers.

As of the next build to the Windows Insider program, Microsoft will require that participants associate their Microsoft Account — typically the same username and password combination for accessing company services such as Outlook.com, OneDrive and Skype — with the preview on their PC.

“You’ll need to connect the MSA [Microsoft Account] that you registered for the Windows Insider Program with (and accepted the ‘Microsoft Windows Insider Program Agreement’) in order to continue receiving new Windows 10 Insider Preview builds (both Fast and Slow rings) from Windows Update,” wrote Gabriel Aul, the engineering general manager for Microsoft’s operating system group who regularly blogs about the preview.

Most testers have already done so, but those that haven’t need to toe the line. “We’re introducing new infrastructure in Windows Update to help us deliver new builds more effectively to Windows Insiders, and ensure that we’re flighting builds to people who have registered and opted in to the program,” said Aul.

Part of that move is due to the impending release of Windows 10, another to the fact that Microsoft will — contrary to past practices with beta programs — continue Insider after the initial launch.

Insider will then become Windows 10′s fastest release “branch” — Microsoft’s label for the multiple update cadences it will offer users — and receive new features, functionality and UI (user interface) and UX (user experience) changes before those on other tracks. Within Insider, users can select from different “rings” — subsets that denote how rough-edged the builds are — as they will be able to do if updating on the other tempos, “Current Branch” and “Current Branch for Business.”

Aul also reiterated what he had said previously on Twitter, that Insider participants would receive the July 29 first stable release starting that day.

 

 

 

Is The Oculus Ready For Mainstream?

June 23, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Gaming

One of the emerging players in the industry is definitely Oculus Rift, a potential leader of the whole Virtual Reality niche.

The Electronic Entertainment Expo or E3 is definitely a good place to show off new tech, and visitors get to see the multi-billion dollar gaming industry jewels at their best. A veritable who is who of the gaming and publishing industry is competing for visitors’ attention and some 50,000 people get to see some of the latest and greatest gaming achievements.

Since Oculus got picked up by Facebook for $2 billion, everyone started to believe that VR is the place to be. Nvidia and AMD, the undisputed leaders of the gaming hardware industry, are investing huge amounts of money and effort to make Virtual Reality a reality, pardon the pun. Oculus needs a lot of GPU performance, the sort of performance you can get from the latest graphics hardware. It will spend every texel that your graphics engine can compute and it will need even more. Oculus needs at least a Radeon R9 290 or Geforce GTX 970 graphics card in order to get you a decent gaming expirience.

This VR need for performance, coupled with demand for 4K panels and gaming rigs, will push graphics hardware development to the next level and there is no doubt that 2016 GPUs will pass the 10 billion transistor barrier.

We got a chance to try the Oculus CV1 Consumer Version that is set to launch in Q1 2016 and we had a whole 7 minutes to play with it. We have to admit that Oculus has a virtually nonexistent public relations department and that we can be happy that we got these seven minutes with the Edge of Nowhere game. You get to chose from a few titles including EVE Valkyrie, Edge of Nowhere, Chronos, AirMech VR, Lucky’s Tale, Herobound: Spirit Champion, VR Sports: Challanage, Esper or Damadged Core. We did tried EVE Valkyrie on both AMD and Nvidia hardware at Crescent Bay demo.

The resolution didn’t change from Crescent Bay last beta Oculus that we got to try so many times. You can see individual pixels and despite the fact that you can look around and see 360 degrees, you would want to get somewhat better resolution.

The second problem was that the Edge of Nowhere game is really hard to play. The Xbox 360 controller is not the greatest tool that will keep you from falling trough the void. It is hard and no, we didn’t get to try the new controller.

My biggest concern is the fact that Virtual Reality glasses are making your slightly dizzy. There are more than a few people who feel really bad after minutes of using Oculus. If 3D glasses at movie theater make you dizzy and uncomfortable, Oculus VR will be your cryptonite. This is going to be a tough nut to crack. Getting into Virtual Reality world and coming out might be a troublesome expirience, too. Every single Oculus demo we got to try since the first one was a few minutes long. We want to see what happens after one or more hours of gameplay. This will be the key thing for the future of Oculus VR (and other VR solutions).

On a less critical note, the glasses get to mess up your hair as you can clearly see from the picture above.

Have in mind that virtual reality is the way to get you to Star Trek holodeck and we hope that this will happen sooner rather than later, but there is a lot of room for improvement. Mark Zuckerberg was very smart to buy Oculus, as the company wants you to move to a VR space and make time consuming stuff such as chat more personal. Millennials will be able to chat more on a much more personal level than older generations, who got used to MIRC, ICQ and Skype.

The fact that HTC and Valve are already making Oculus run for its money is great, as every industry needs competition. Some other players are trying to get to this market but we saw a few other smaller players that are trying their best, but they are still not at the level where these big boys are.

Every new technology just needs time to mature, and Virtual reality is no exception. Just give it some time and please don’t expect it to be the best thing since sliced bread.

Courtesy-Fud

Box Integrate Microsoft’s Office Online With Its Storage Service.

June 19, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Uncategorized

Box followed competitor Dropbox to integrate Microsoft’s Office Online with its cloud storage service.

“Today, we’re introducing Box for Office Online, making it easier than ever for our customers to create and manage their Word docs, PowerPoint presentations and Excel spreadsheets securely from anywhere and on any device, right from Box,” said David Still, Box’s chief of mobile products, in a post to his company’s blog.

Like the ties between Dropbox and Office Online — the latter is Microsoft’s browser-based app trio of Excel, PowerPoint and Word — Box lets customers open documents from within its service, edit and then save back to the cloud. Box users will also be able to create new Office Online documents.

Dropbox added the same functionality to its browser-based UI in April, part of a broader partnership with Microsoft that kicked off in November 2014.

Still also promised future Box moves to bring it more on par with Dropbox. “Later this year, [Box and Microsoft] intend to further collaborate on integrations with native Office clients on iOS, Android, and Windows,” Still wrote.

He did not provide a release window for updates to Box’s mobile apps.

Microsoft added Dropbox support to its Office apps on iPhone, iPad and Android late last year, and Dropbox released a Windows Phone app in January.

Box took advantage of Microsoft’s Office 365 Cloud Storage Partner Program, an initiative by the Redmond, Wash. developer to extend the influence of Office by letting third-party cloud storage services connect to Office Online and Office for iOS. Box signed up with the program in mid-February.

“By opening up Office Online, Microsoft is showing an amazing amount of proactive enablement for moving the future of work this direction,” said Box CEO Aaron Levie in a separate post.

Although Microsoft competes with both Dropbox and Box with its own OneDrive cloud storage service, the company has aggressively moved toward a more agnostic outlook, whether regarding rival platforms or competitive services.

 

 

 

Microsoft, IBM And Others Support Centralized Patent Database

June 17, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

An Army of tech companies have joined forces to back a new system designed to keep the patent trolls at bay.

The Open Register of Patent Ownership (ORoPO) has been backed by key partners including IBM, Microsoft, ARM, BAE Systems, Shazam, Patent Properties, Conversant and Finjan.

ORoPO is voluntary and not for profit, and founder members’ patents are already available online.

The idea is to put the information currently stored in the world’s 180 patent offices in a central repository to avoid duplication, omission and inaccuracy, all of which can be pounced on by trolls.

Manny Schecter, chief patent counsel at IBM, said: “ORoPO is a simple solution to a complex and long-standing problem.

“Greater transparency around patent ownership is vital to eliminating transactional inefficiencies and enabling a patent system that runs optimally for every constituent in the system, from patent owners to innovators, licensees and the public.”

“Microsoft believes that patent ownership transparency continues to be an important part of a well-functioning patent system,” added Erich Andersen, vice president and deputy general counsel at Microsoft.

“Microsoft has publicly listed all the patents the company owns since March 2013, and we will continue to do so via our participation in ORoPO.

“This voluntary effort, led by top patenting companies, will help to ensure that the patent system continues to promote and encourage innovation across our economy.”

ORoPO estimates that 25 percent of information held in patent offices is inaccurate, which is even more horrifying against the backdrop of intellectual property forming 70 percent of enterprise value.

ORoPO is to be led by Roger Burt as CEO with an advisory board consisting of key people from the technology and legal sectors.

The US Supreme Court acknowledged ‘patent troll’ as a valid term for the first time last month in a case investigating whether ‘good faith’ was an adequate defence in cases where a patent is assumed invalid.

Patent and intellectual property fights have been a mainstay of the IT industry, and the tussles between Apple and Samsung have taken center stage.

A peace accord seems to have been reached, but many existing cases are still sub judice.

 

Courtesy-TheInq

Can Oculus Succeed At $599?

June 15, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Gaming

We were recently asked what we would want to see with the CV1 Oculus consumer version.

Fudzilla tried every single developer’s version and we tried the last beta, codenamed Crescent Bay, at more than one action. Recently Nvidia had a bunch of demos that we got to experience last week at Computex in Taiwan.

Crescent Bay is good, but we wanted a higher resolution per eye. Unfortunately, the Oculus Consumer version comes with the same OLED based 2160×1200 at 90Hz panel, split over dual displays. This means that you are getting 1080×1200 at 90 Hz per eye. These are the numbers that Atman Binstock, Chief Architect at Oculus Rift shared with the community some months ago.

Another thing that Oculus CEO Palmer Luckey didn’t mention is the retail price of the VR glasses. From what we could find out, the company plans to sell them for $499. The goal is to offer this technology together with PC for $1500 and you can get a decent PC with GTX 970 or AMD Radeon R9 290 for that money. Have in mind that the computer components will get even cheaper by Q1 2016 when Oculus plans to ship their glasses. Oculus issued a statement that $1500 will get you a PC with glasses.

The main question remains how they feel after hours or playing. Every single demo we tried was a few minutes long, but what happens after a couple of hours of playing?

And don’t worry the second generation consumer version that we expect to see in the second half of 2016 will probably have better displays and improved tracking sensors too.

Courtesy-Fud

 

BlackBerry’s Embracing Of Android Has Hidden Potential

June 15, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

BlackBerry Ltd’s move to embrace Android, although geared towards lifting revenue from its software and device management segment, could inadvertently give its device arm a new lease on life.

“From the standpoint of marketing, this is a great way for BlackBerry to get visibility. It really doesn’t hurt them much, and the upside is high,” said Rob Enderle, who runs technology consulting firm Enderle Group.

Enderle and other financial and tech analysts agree that the move by BlackBerry does present its own set of challenges as the company would have to support two platforms and potentially put some resources into marketing an Android device, but with little to lose most agree it comes with little downside.

“If Android has one significant weakness it is security and that’s just the thing that BlackBerry can fix, so it could play out pretty well and I am actually quite surprised that they did not try this sooner,” said Enderle, adding that BlackBerry has to deliver a compelling device in order for the gambit to work.

Reuters reported last week that BlackBerry was considering a move to test run Android on its upcoming slider device, as part of a bid to convince potential corporate and government clients that its device management system, BES12, is truly able of manage and secure not just BlackBerry devices, but also devices powered by Google’s Android, Apple’s iOS and Microsoft’s Windows operating system.

“In order for BES12 to succeed it has to be viewed by all as platform agnostic, and what better way to demonstrate that other than by doing it yourself,” said Ramon Llamas, an analyst with technology research firm IDC.

BlackBerry, which once dominated the smartphone market, has seen its market share drop to under 1 percent, as the iPhone and a slew of Android devices from Samsung have captured market share. John Chen, a turnaround expert brought in to fix its slide, is now pivoting BlackBerry to focus more on its well-regarded software and device management business.

 

 

 

Can Mozilla Put VR In The Browzer?

June 11, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Around The Net

Engineers at the Mozzarella Foundation have finally come up with an idea that could make Firefox relevant again.

For ages now Firefox has been losing users almost as it holds on to their memory and while it has made pushes into mobile, the outfit has not really done much cutting edge since it sank Internet Exploder in Europe.

All that is set to change as the Foundation starts putting Virtual Reality under the bonnet of the browser.

Mozilla researchers Vlad Vukicevic and Josh Carpenter have been telling Road to VR about Mozilla’s cunning plans to build building native-feeling immersive VR sites.

“Ultimately, we want users to have a seamless, friction-free experience on the Web, whether browsing existing Web content or new VR content. We also want developers to have a clear path to creating new fully-immersive VR web sites as well as adding VR elements to their current sites. Finally, we want all of this to work on the widest possible range of hardware, as one of the strengths of the Web is its ability to scale from the lowest end mobile phones to the highest end desktops,” they said.

Initially the Web VR has focused on creating content using WebGL, which is a full 3D graphics API. WebGL is powerful, but it’s an API borrowed from the 3D world purely to enable high performance 3D graphics on the Web.

 

WebGL is a good place to get started with VR experiments on the Web, but HTML+CSS are still the languages we use to structure and lay out websites. So for VR Web to take off, it needs to enable Web developers to create VR experiences using these languages they already know.

So there has to been a way to view and interact with HTML and CSS websites in virtual reality and this will mean VR equivalents of scrolling, clicking links, zooming in, etc.
“We will need to determine how to display desktop and mobile sites that were never designed for virtual reality,” they said.

WebVR is currently best supported on desktop browsers like Firefox Nightly, where it is experienced as a temporary mode within a traditional 2D browsing user interface. These interfaces were not designed with virtual reality in mind, and as a consequence we cannot “browse” inside VR.

“We do not believe Web VR will take off until we can truly surf the Web from inside virtual reality, with the functionality we expect from modern browsers. We have begun this work with our early ‘Hiro’ prototypes, and we have many more ideas!”

It is all looking jolly interesting and we have a soft spot for the Open Saucy Mozilla so we hope it comes off.

Courtesy-TheInq

Dropbox Going After Enterprise Users With New Features

June 8, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Dropbox aims to grab a bigger share the enterprise, and last week the company rolled out several new Dropbox for Business features that sweeten the deal for corporate users.

New tiered admin roles are designed to help delegate day-to-day responsibilities, which could make life easier for IT administrators charged with managing large Dropbox deployment. Companies can now assign admins to one of three distinct roles, each with a different set of permissions.

An enterprise installer, meanwhile, lets admins automate the deployment of Dropbox for Business remotely to any Windows desktop machine.

Dropbox is also working to beef up security — it was recently certified as compliant with ISO guidelines on how it guards personally identifiable information — and now it’s made it easier for admins to require two-step verification for account access as well.

Finally, a new connector being released in limited beta offers Active Directory integration, and Dropbox is extending the Dropbox for Business API for further integrations as well. Adallom, CloudLock, Elastica, Mover, Netskope and SkySync are all among the partners that have begun building integrations with Dropbox for Business, the company said.

Dropbox is one of several Web companies that have entered large organizations through a “side door” of sorts by providing inexpensive services whose ease of access make them popular among individual employees and small work groups, said Charles King, principal analyst with Pund-IT.

Ultimately, though, Dropbox is trying to position itself in the enterprise as an alternative to Microsoft for cloud storage and file sharing, and it’s not clear how well that will succeed.

 

 

 

Ford To Debut Blackberry OS-based Entertainment System In 2016 Cars

June 4, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

After announcing in December that it was replacing of Microsoft’s platform for Blackberry’s QNX OS on its infotainment systems, Ford has confirmed the first of the new systems will launch in 2016 models.

Ford said its new Sync 3 communications and entertainment system will first roll out in the 2016 Escape and Fiesta.

Both the new Escape SUV and compact hatchback Fiesta will be on sale this summer, and Sync 3 will migrate to all Ford vehicles in North America by the end of 2016.

The new system, which features all-new hardware and software, will have faster performance, conversational voice recognition, an intuitive smartphone-like touch screen and an easier-to-understand graphical interface, Ford said.

Tile-like icons dominate the interface, with a quick-access function tray along the bottom for a more straightforward user experience.

The new entertainment/communications system will also offer commands and smartphone-like gestures that including pinch-to-zoom and swipe, along with crisp, more modern graphics.

For example, phone contacts are searchable via a simple swipe of the finger to scroll through the alphabet. With One Box Search, users can look up points of interest or enter addresses in much the same way they use an Internet search engine.

With a simpler command structure, the new system will also minimize the number of steps needed to carry out commands, such as selecting music, making a call or searching for a destination.

Sync3 also includes a seamless integration of AppLink, Siri Eyes-Free capability, software updates via Wi-Fi and an enhanced, subscription-free 911 Assist.

More than 12 million Sync-equipped vehicles on the road globally use the Windows Embedded Automotive operating system, which Ford has been using since 2007.

While Ford has declined to talk about why it made the switch from Windows, negative consumer and industry feedback likely played a significant role, according to analysts.

 

 

 

Office 365 Going Wi-Fi

June 4, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Around The Net

According to Techradar Redmond has changed the name of Skype Wi-Fi to Microsoft Wi-fi and is baking Wi-Fi services to Office 365 users.

Microsoft will launch a business version of the service for Office 365 Enterprise customers, allowing firms to ensure that their employees are connected .

The idea is that if you are not a business customer, the service is likely to be PAYG (pay as you go) – one similar to Skype Wi-Fi – where you can either top up online or via a scratch card.

Microsoft Wi-Fi will likely allow customers to connect to more than 10 million hotspots compared to just 2 million for the current Skype Wi-Fi service; more than 130 countries and territories are listed in Microsoft’s hotspot database.

The service will soon be available on all major mobile and desktop platforms even MacOS which would be a little amusing.

Courtesy-Fud