Subscribe to:

Subscribe to :: TheGuruReview.net ::

IS Apple Using Qualcomm Patents Without Paying

December 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Apple’s legal spat with Qualcomm just got even messier as the chipmaker found even more patents which it thinks that Apple is using without permission.

Qualcomm filed three new patent infringement complaints against the fruity cargo cult saying there were 16 more of its patents that Apple was using in its iPhones.

The new complaints represent the latest development in a long-standing dispute and follows Apple’s countersuit against Qualcomm, which alleged that it invented part of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon mobile phone chips.

Qualcomm in July accused Apple of infringing several patents related to helping mobile phones get better battery life.

That case accompanied a complaint with the US International Trade Commission seeking to ban the import of Apple iPhones that use competing Intel Corp (INTC.O) chips because of the alleged patent violations.

The three cases filed Thursday were all filed in the US District Court for the Southern District of California in San Diego. One of the cases is a companion civil lawsuit to a new complaint also filed Thursday with the ITC that seeks the same remedy of banning iPhones with Intel chips. The other two cases are civil patent infringement lawsuits.

It all started when Apple tried to increase the margins for its dying iPhone cash cow.  It decided that Qualcomm was asking too much and demanded a reduction.

In January, Apple sued Qualcomm for nearly $1 billion in patent royalty rebates that Qualcomm allegedly withheld from Apple.

In a related suit, Qualcomm sued the contract manufacturers that make Apple’s phones, but Apple joined in to defend them.

Qualcomm in November sued Apple over an alleged breach of a software agreement between the two companies. Apple emailed Qualcomm to request “highly confidential” information about how its chips work on an unidentified wireless carrier’s network, Qualcomm alleged, but Apple had copied an Intel engineer in the email for information.

Courtesy-Fud

The ITC To Investigate Apple

November 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The United States International Trade Commission today announced that it has launched an investigation into allegations that Apple infringed on patents owned by Aqua Connect.

Aqua Connect and its subsidiary Strategic Technology partners filed complaints against Apple with the United States International Trade Commission and the District Court for the Central District of California accusing Macs, iOS devices, and Apple TVs of infringing on two of its patents.

The two patents in question include U.S. Patent RE46,386, “Updating a User Session in a Mach-derived Computer System Environment” and U.S. Patent 8,924,502, “System, Method and Computer Program Product for Updating a User Session in a Mach-derived System Environment.”

According to Aqua Connect, the patents relate to screen sharing, remote desktop, and terminal server technology. Aqua Connect says that it built the first remote desktop solution for the Mac in 2008, which Apple later built into its iOS and macOS products in the form of AirPlay and other functionality without permission.

Ronnie Exley, CEO of Aqua Connect said his outfit invented and built the first fully functional remote desktop and terminal server solution for Mac in 2008.

“Initially, the product had Apple’s full support. But years later, Apple built our technology into its macOS and iOS operating systems without our permission. These lawsuits seek to stop Apple from continuing to use our technology in their macOS and iOS operating systems.”

Aqua Connect’s complaint with the International Trade Commission asks for an exclusion order and a cease and desist order that would bar Apple from importing its products into the United States.

The ITC says it will be investigating “certain Apple Mac computers, iPhones, iPads, iPods, and Apple TVs.”

Courtesy-Fud

Did Qualcomm Inadvertently Help Apple

September 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Qualcomm has published a blog post that praises itself and its Android partners for inventing all the industry firsts that Apple is claiming to have invented in its iPhone X.

These include wireless charging, dual-camera systems, OLED smartphone screens, edge-to-edge displays, and more features that the upcoming iPhone X has.

The blog is a reminder to Apple about how dependent the fruity cargo-cult is on Qualcomm technology.

Inventions from Qualcomm lay the foundation for so many technologies and experiences we value in our smartphones today — on Android and other platforms, Qualcomm said. One great example is Gigabit LTE. The latest Gigabit LTE-enabled Android smartphones can download content from mobile networks 135 times faster than the first Android phones could nine years ago, it continued. “Meanwhile, we’ve been inventing foundational technologies for Gigabit LTE for well over a decade.”

Apple and Qualcomm are currently embroiled in what’s turning into a vicious, global patent licensing dispute and its modems are at the centre of the dispute.

Apple believes it should be allowed to pay Qualcomm what it likes for the technology it invented and it should be allowed to make huge profits while other companies do all the research.

Qualcomm never mentions Apple by name in the blog – the closest the company ever comes is with this line: “Inventions from Qualcomm lay the foundation for so many technologies and experiences we value in our smartphones today – on Android and other platforms.” 

Courtesy-Fud

Will The U.S. ITC Really Investigate Apple

August 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The International Trade Commission has announced that it will launch an investigation into Apple following allegations from Qualcomm that its devices violate six of its patents.

The move, arguably procedural, means that the ITC will formally investigate Qualcomm’s complaint, rather than dismiss it outright.

“The US International Trade Commission has voted to institute an investigation of certain mobile electronic devices and radio frequency and processing components thereof,” the ITC said.

“The products at issue in the investigation are mobile electronic devices – such as the iPhone 7, and specific components for such

Qualcomm’s complaint alleges that iPhones, which are made in China, should not be allowed to be brought into the United States if they infringe on its patents, and if the chipmaker has its way, the ITC would ban imports and sales of Apple’s handsets.

At the heart of the matter is Apple’s use of cellular baseband processors made by Intel, with Qualcomm arguing that iPhones Intel’s 4G wireless chips are effectively using six Qualcomm patents “unfairly” and “unlawfully”.

Unsurprisingly, Qualcomm said it is “pleased” with the ITC’s decision to investigate Apple.

“Qualcomm is pleased with the ITC’s decision to investigate Apple’s unfair trade practices and the unauthorized importation of products using Qualcomm’s patents,” said Don Rosenberg, executive vice president and general counsel of Qualcomm.

“We look forward to the ITC’s expeditious investigation of Apple’s ongoing infringement of our intellectual property and the accelerated relief that the Commission can provide.'”

Apple, when asked for comment, pointed to this prior statement from June: “Qualcomm’s illegal business practices are harming Apple and the entire industry.

“They supply us with a single connectivity component, but for years have been demanding a percentage of the total cost of our products – effectively taxing Apple’s innovation.”

Last month, Intel filed its own statement with the ITC, claiming that Qualcomm’s request for the regulatory agency to intervene was “a transparent effort to stave off lawful competition from Qualcomm’s only remaining rival.”

Courtesy-TheInq

Is Intel Accusing Qualcomm Of Being A Monopoly

July 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Intel has buddied-up with Apple in its legal fight against Qualcomm and has slammed the firm for abusing its position in the industry. 

Intel, no stranger to an abuse of chip monopoly, claims it’s the only remaining competitor for Qualcomm in the mobile market, and by suing Apple, Qualcomm is trying to deliberately squeeze Intel from the baseband modem market.

“Qualcomm did not initiate this investigation to stop the alleged infringement of its patent rights; rather, its complaint is a transparent effort to stave off lawful competition from Qualcomm’s only remaining rival,” Intel said in a statement.

“This twisted use of the Commission’s process is just the latest in a long line of anticompetitive strategies that Qualcomm has used to quash incipient and potential competitors and avoid competition on the merits.”

Intel goes on to argue that fulfilling Qualcomm’s request “would cause significant harm to the public interest,” arguing that a victory for the company would “severely damage competitive conditions in the United States economy by reinforcing Qualcomm’s hold on the premium LTE modem merchant market.”

The statement, filed with the US International Trade Commission (ITC, comes in response to Qualcomm’s complaint alleging patent infringement by certain Apple devices, in which it asked the ITC to ban the import of Intel-powered iPhones. 

This ain’t Intel’s only problem with Qualcomm. The chipmaker also argues that Qualcomm has engaged in other monopolistic and anti-competitive practices. These practices include forcing manufacturers to pay “exorbitant” royalties for every device they sell even if they don’t contain Qualcomm technology, and offering Apple lower licensing fees for using its chips exclusively.

“These arrangements foreclosed rivals like Intel from competing for Apple’s vital business,” Intel said. 

Earlier this year, Intel kicked off at Qualcomm over its partnership with Microsoft to bring ARM-based Windows PCs to market this year, threatening that emulation doesn’t mean that copyright battles are off the table. 

“There have been reports that some companies may try to emulate Intel’s proprietary x86 ISA without Intel’s authorization,” Intel’s chief lawyer Stephen Rodgers and Director of Intel Labs Richard A. Uhlig said:

“We do not welcome unlawful infringement of our patents, and we fully expect other companies to continue to respect Intel’s intellectual property rights.” 

Courtesy-TheInq

Does Apple Prefer Qualcomm 4G Inside

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Our well-informed sources are whispering that Apple might order more Qualcomm 4G modems for the upcoming iPhone compared to the orders for iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. 

The reason is simple, most US carriers wants to play the Gigabit LTE card for the holiday season, especially in the US and, guess what, Intel’s XMM 7480 doesn’t support it.

Fudzilla has talked a lot about the fact that Intel will get inside of the iPhone business and this has happened with the debut of the iPhone 7 / 7 Plus using Intel’s XMM 7360 modem. At a later date, as we expected, it was revealed that Intel has an inferior modem people to Qualcomm’s solution, but this was hardly a surprise.

Intel confirmed to Fudzilla that Intel plans to ship 7480 this year and this is the most likely candidate for the modem inside of the next gen iPhone. This is the one that everyone calls the iPhone 8 (iPhone 7S) and if all goes well, it should launch in September 2017.  

Intel’s XMM 7480 modem doesn’t support GigabitLTE but it is Intel’s first modem to support TE-FDD, LTE-TDD, TD-SCDMA, and legacy 2G and 3G. The previous 7360 modem was missing the SCDMA support that is crucial for Verizon in the USA and China Telekom in China.

So far, all the US carriers plan to launch the Gigabit LTE in the US. AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon plan to launch Gigabit LTE in selected markets before the end of the year. AT&T already launched GigabitLTE in late April it in Austin Texas.

Intel’s own staff at Mobile World Congress 2017 confirmed Fudzilla that Intel XMM 7560, Intel’s first Gigabit LTE modem won’t be launching in 2017 and that we can expect it next year.

If Apple wants to stay competitive in the US carriers to Samsung S7 / Note 8 and all the other high-end phones with Snapdragon 835 (Gigabit LTE capable Snapdragon X16 modem), it might have to use more Qualcomm modems than last year.

Apple used the common denominator strategy with the iPhone 7, crippling the modems’ features and speed in order to match the capability of Intel based iPhones versus Qualcomm based iPhones.

To refresh your memory, the A1778 and A1784 iPhone models use a GSM-only Intel XMM7360 modem while the A1660 and 1661 iPhone models use a GSM/CDMA-compatible Qualcomm MDM9645M modem. The A1660 and 1661 iPhone is available in the United States, Puerto Rico, Hong Kong and China. You can get the A1660 on Sprint and Verizon or when you buy a locked AT&T phone at Best Buy.

The iPhone A1778 has no support for TD-SCDMA and CDMA EV-DO Rev. A bands and therefore, won’t work properly on CDMA networks like Sprint or Verizon. Most phones in the US from T-Mobile and AT&T use the Intel modem and come from the A1778 / A1784 family. Almost all of Europe and most of Asia use Intel modem iPhones too.

It will be up to Apple to decide if it plans to increase the market share of Gigabit LTE iPhones in the US. In case it makes this choice, it will increase the orders of Qualcomm modems for iPhones.

We do believe that marketing chaps at Samsung and the rest of the Android alliance will talk a lot about the importance of Gigabit LTE. Carriers wants to make the point that the average speed will increase for everyone at their network, making the operations slightly cheaper for them.

If you are one of the people who think that Apple is getting cold feet toward Qualcomm and will try to order less Qualcomm modems, think again. Intel still misses crucial features including the Gigabit LTE 4×4 DL-MIMO and 256QAM support and it will only match what Qualcomm has today in the course of 2018. The XMM 7580 has all these features including 225Mbps CAT 15 speed in the uplink and 1 Gbps CAT 16 in the downlink. Qualcomm can do 1.2Gbps with Snapdragon X20 and CAT 13, 150 Mbps uplink and will probably announce even faster solution in mid-2018. You can see the trend – Qualcomm is likely to stay ahead of competition (Intel) in the future too and let’s not forget that Qualcomm has been designing manufacturing modems for much longer than anyone else. Intel modem skills mostly come from 2011 acquisition of Infineon while CDMA capability comes from VIA, yes that PC chipset manufacturer from 15 years ago VIA.

Despite the licensing lawsuits between Apple and Qualcomm, these two companies have to work together and the whole licensing mess looks like a play between big players where one wants to pay less for the licenses. You can call this public negotiation if you want, where one player wants to pay less and one wants to prevent that and keep making the same. 

Courtesy-Fud

Can Qualcomm Get iPhones With Intel Inside Banned

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Qualcomm is stepping things up a notch in its ongoing legal battle with Apple by seeking a sales and import ban on same iPhone models. 

We knew this was coming, and Qualcomm on Thursday made it official by filing a complaint with the US International Trade Commission (ITC) alleging that iPhones using Intel’s 4G wireless chips are effectively using six Qualcomm patents “unfairly” and “unlawfully”.

Qualcomm has previously argued that Apple purposefully didn’t use the full potential of the Qualcomm chips inside the iPhone 7 so that they wouldn’t outperform the modems provided by Intel. 

The six patents in question cover “key technologies that enable important features and functions” and “enable high performance in a smartphone while extending battery life”, according to Qualcomm, which also argues that none of the patents could be considered standards-essential.

“The six asserted patents are not essential to practice any standards in a mobile device or subject to a commitment to offer to license such patents,” the firm said.

The firm is asking the ITC to investigate Apple and “and ultimately issue a Limited Exclusion Order (LEO) to bar importation of those iPhones and other products into the United States.”

Not only that, but Qualcomm is also seeking a Cease and Desist Order barring further sales of infringeming Apple products, along with “the marketing, advertising, demonstration, warehousing of inventory for distribution and use of those imported products in the United States”. 

In addition to its planned ITC filing, Qualcomm also filed a complaint with the US District Court for the Southern District of California regarding infringement of the six patents.

“Qualcomm’s inventions are at the heart of every iPhone and extend well beyond modem technologies or cellular standards,” said Don Rosenberg, executive vice president and general counsel of Qualcomm.

“The patents we are asserting represent six important technologies, out of a portfolio of thousands, and each is vital to iPhone functions.  Apple continues to use Qualcomm’s technology while refusing to pay for it. These lawsuits seek to stop Apple’s infringement of six of our patented technologies.”

In response to Qualcomm’s actions, Apple reiterated its  previous comments comments, saying: “Qualcomm’s illegal business practices are harming Apple and the entire industry,” the company said when it filed its suit against Qualcomm last month.

“They supply us with a single connectivity component, but for years have been demanding a percentage of the total cost of our products – effectively taxing Apple’s innovation.” 

Courtesy-TheInq

Does Intel’s Broadband Modem Have Security Issues?

May 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Intel’s Puma 6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low-bandwidth denial-of-service attack.

Basically, the attack is pretty simple to carry out. If your target is using a Puma 6-powered home gateway, and you know their public IP address, you can kick them off the internet.

The flaw is “trivial” to exploit in the wild, and would effectively make a targeted box useless for the duration of the attack. It can be exploited remotely, and there is no way to mitigate it.

Puma 6 modems are pitched as gigabit broadband gateway. If the devices can be potentially choked and knocked out simply by receiving traffic that is a fraction of the bandwidth their owners are paying for.

The Puma 6 chipset is used in several ISP-branded cable modems, including some Xfinity boxes supplied by Comcast in the US and the latest Virgin Media hubs in the UK.

There is a class action lawsuit over the performance of cable modems with Intel’s Puma 6 chipset as the Atom chip inside cannot really cope.

Courtesy-Fud

Apple Goes After Qualcomm

January 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Apple believes that it can make a more than a billion dollars for suing Qualcomm for charging too much on its patents.

Apple has sued its long term partner days after the US Federal Trade Commission began suing Qualcomm for anti-competitive practices over the same issue. The commission said that Qualcomm had been forcing phone manufactures to pay “disproportionately high” fees for use of patents necessary to make a smartphone

Qualcomm denied all of the commission’s claims, and it says in a statement that Apple’s claims are “baseless.”

Jobs Mob insists that Qualcomm withheld nearly $1 billion “as retaliation for responding truthfully to law enforcement agencies investigating them.” That was apparently related to a South Korean investigation of Qualcomm, which led to an $853 million fine last month.

“Despite being just one of over a dozen companies who contributed to basic cellular standards, Qualcomm insists on charging Apple at least five times more in payments than all the other cellular patent licensors we have agreements with combined,” Apple said.

The irony is that Apple has a sweetheart deal with Qualcomm which grants it exclusivity as a modem supplier in exchange. That deal had Qualcomm giving rebates to Apple, which seems to be why this suit is over withheld payments, rather than the fees themselves.

In a statement, Qualcomm general counsel Don Rosenberg said that Apple was “has intentionally mischaracterized” the companies’ agreements and has been “actively encouraging regulatory attacks on Qualcomm’s business” around the world. “We welcome the opportunity to have these meritless claims heard in court where we will be entitled to full discovery of Apple’s practices and a robust examination of the merits,” Rosenberg said.

Courtesy-Fud

Intel Goes Bullish

September 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

It is starting to look like the PC market is picking up and Intel has raised its quarterly revenue forecast for the first time in more than two years.

Shares in Intel as much as 4.1 percent to a more than 15-year high on the back of the news which indicates the PC depression might be finally coming to an end..

Sales in the company’s PC business declined three percent to $7.3 billion in the latest quarter. The unit includes sales of chips for mobile phones and tablets. But Intel said that the green shoots of recovery are here.

Firstly HP said last month that revenue in its computer business rose 7.5 percent in the third quarter from the second as sales of notebooks improved. At the time FBN Securities analyst Shebly Seyrafi said commentary from Intel and HP suggested that PCs were “not as dead as people were thinking.”

Research firm IDC said in July global PC shipments fell less than expected in the second quarter, helped by strength in the United States.

Intel now says it expected third-quarter revenue to be $15.6 billion, plus or minus $300 million, compared with its prior forecast of $14.9 billion, plus or minus $500 million.

That implies the highest-ever quarterly revenue for Intel. Wall Street analysts on average were expecting $14.90 billion.

RBC Capital Markets analyst Amit Daryanani said the pre-announcement was a good first step to the PC story stabilising at Intel. Shares of rival AMD were up about 1 percent, while those of Micron Technology Inc (MU.O) and HP were marginally higher.Shares in Intel had shot ip up 2.6 percent at $37.53

Courtesy-Fud

Will Intel Help Apple Make Gains?

September 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

It is starting to look like the rumors that Intel is going to start making Apple’s mobile chip are actually true – despite a lack of official confirmation from anyone.

Gartner Group, which is not likely to make this sort of stuff up, says it is 100 percent sure that Intel is going to start making Jobs’ Mob chips in 2018. The Nikkei has also said something similar and now the Tame Apple Press, which never reports anything without Apple’s covert blessing is also on board with the rumors.

All this is a kick in the bottom line for Apple’s existing partners TSMC and Samsung, but then being an Apple partner must be like being a battered wife of a billionaire. You might have nice things but they come at a cost and eventually he is going to divorce you for someone younger anyway.

In this case a source close to Jobs’ Mob claimed that Apple had already agreed that a move to have Intel made chips for future iPhones and iPads was a priority.

It is unlikely that this could happen before 2018 but it is unlikely that this is so Apple can avoid its TSMC addiction. In fact it is more to do with finding an alternative to Samsung. Apple has huge problems working with Samsung which is its main rival for the iPhone and tablets. There are some Apple executives who still feel that Samsung must pay for stealing the rounded rectangle.

Taking Apple’s chip business away from Samsung will hurt the company overall. The only question is if Intel has the technical ability to make its mobile chips as successfully.

Courtesy-Fud

Does Qualcomm Need Apple?

June 21, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

The fanboys aka the Apple Press has been running down Qualcomm since its favourite company announced it was buying chips from Intel, but there are good reasons why the American chipmaker should not care that much.

As we have been saying for ages, Jobs’ Mob is no longer exclusively going with Qualcomm to provide modem chips for the upcoming iPhone 7. The deal, while large, is tailored for some of Apple’s partnerships. Intel gets AT&T phones and Qualcomm remains the supplier for Verizon network phones and for China.

The press has been claiming that it is terrible news for Qualcomm. But it appears Qualcomm knew it was coming and had already factored in the loss of the business into its results. The reason Qualcomm is not losing any sleep over the deal is because the most Intel is going to get is a third of the iPhone modems. This is what in financial terms is considered a “pisser” but hardly a reason to jump off any buildings over.

Other good things are happening to Qualcomm which more than balance out what has been lost to Intel. Firstly its latest Snapdragons are selling extremely well and secondly the shine is starting to go off its number one rival MediaTek.

For a while, naysayers have been predicting that MediaTek was going to sink Qualcomm. In fact there was even a suggestion that Qualcomm should get out of chipmaking and become a patent troll.

MediaTek had been luring away Qualcomm customers with cheaper chips, which combined with Apple, Samsung and Huawei making their own chips was creating a perfect storm of doom.

Now there is a suggestion that MediaTek’s growth wagon might have stalled. MediaTek’s sales fell 9.4 per cent annually last quarter to $1.7 billion. Its operating margin halved from 16 per cent last year to eight per cent. The reason was due to higher expenses across the board. This meant that its net income fell to $136 million. MediaTek is still more profitable than Qualcomm’s chipmaking division has a wafer thin 5 per cent last quarter.

Analysts expect MediaTek to post double-digit sales growth fuelled by rising demand for 4G smartphone chips in China. But its margins are also expected to keep contracting due to tough competition from Qualcomm and Spreadtrum.

Another risk for MediaTek is its dependence on China. Taiwan just got rid of the pro-unification KMT party, which controlled the presidency for the past eight years, in favour of the pro-independence DPP party.

MediaTek needs direct investments from mainland China to fight off Qualcomm, but it is finding that the Taiwanese government is blocking that sort of investment cash.

All this is giving Qualcomm a fighting chance in the area where it makes a lot of its cash. Sure its margins might be lower, but it still making more money. Enough so that it does not have to worry about losing a small about of dosh to Intel.

Courtesy-Fud

 

Apple’s Next iPhone Will Use Intel Modem Chips

June 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

Apple Inc’s next iPhone will use modems chips from Intel Corp, taking the place of those made by Qualcomm Inc in some versions of the new smartphone, Bloomberg reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

Intel’s modem chips will be in iPhones used on AT&T Inc’s U.S. network and some other versions of the smartphone for overseas markets, Bloomberg reported on Friday.

However, iPhones sold in China will use Qualcomm chips, and iPhones on Verizon Communications Inc’s network will also stick with Qualcomm, Bloomberg added.

Qualcomm’s shares fell 1.7 percent on Friday, while Intel’s stock was up 0.3 percent. Apple shares were down 0.5 percent in morning trading.

On an earnings call in April, Qualcomm Chief Executive Officer Steve Mollenkopf said he was assuming that a major customer would switch to multiple suppliers.

An Intel spokeswoman declined to comment on the story. Qualcomm and Apple were not immediately available for comment.

 

Qualcomm Decides To Remain Whole, Nixes Split Idea

December 17, 2015 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Qualcomm Inc has changed its mind about splitting into separate chipmaking and technology licensing businesses, concluding a six-month strategic review instigated by hedge fund Jana Partners.

San Diego-based Qualcomm, the biggest maker of chips used in mobile phones, said its current structure offered unique strategic benefits that cannot be replicated.

Qualcomm, whose earnings have slumped by more than 40 percent in each of the last three quarters, said it had “a focused plan” in place that it believed would drive growth. Chief Executive Steve Mollenkopf did not elaborate.

The company has also said all along that its existing structure allowed it to leverage relationships with Chinese customers, which are expanding quickly into other countries.

Jana, which owned about 28.6 million Qualcomm shares as of Sept. 30, is comfortable with Qualcomm’s decision and supportive of the board’s efforts, people familiar with the matter said.

Qualcomm said business in the current quarter was stronger than expected as 3G and 4G device shipments were helping its licensing business and cost cuts were taking hold.

The chipmaker said it now expected earnings per share for the quarter to be at or modestly above the high end of its forecast range. The company had forecast earnings of 80-90 cents per share for the quarter.

The technology licensing business has driven Qualcomm’s profits for years, thanks to the royalties it collects on the chip-technology developed by its chipmaking unit.

“I think it’s better that they didn’t split. I’m happy about that,” Tigress Financial Partners analyst Ivan Feinseth said.

Qualcomm can continue to outsource hardware manufacturing without having to go through a split, he said.

 

 

Microsoft Expects CEO Position To Be Filled Early In 2014

December 20, 2013 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The board member heading up Microsoft Corp’s search for a new chief executive said on he anticipates an appointment to be made early next year, the first time the board has been so specific on timing.

The announcement suggests the world’s biggest software company is nearing the end of its search for a new leader, which began in August when Steve Ballmer announced his plan to retire within 12 months.

Microsoft pledged to pick a successor within that timeframe, although most investors had expected the process to be finished by December or January.

“It’s a complex job. I don’t think it’s surprising that it is taking some time to try to find the right person,” said Kirk Materne, an analyst at Evercore Partners.

“We’re moving ahead well, and I expect we’ll complete our work in the early part of 2014,” Microsoft lead independent director John Thompson said in a blog post on the company’s website.

Thompson is leading the four-man committee to find a new CEO, which includes co-founder and chairman Bill Gates.

Sources familiar with the search process have told Reuters that the committee is down to a “handful” of candidates, including Ford Motor Co CEO Alan Mulally, at least one external candidate from the technology industry and one or two internal candidates.

“We identified over 100 possible candidates, talked with several dozen and then focused our energy intensely on a group of about 20 individuals,” said Thompson in the blog. “As this group has narrowed, we’ve done deeper research and investigation, including with the full board.”

Intense speculation has surrounded Ford’s Mulally as a leading candidate. He has not denied interest in the job, but has repeatedly said he enjoys working at Ford, where he is slated to remain through 2014.

Last week it was reported that Qualcomm Inc executive Steve Mollenkopf was a leading candidate for the job, but the chip maker forestalled that by making him CEO.

In choosing between Mulally, a candidate from the technology industry, and its own ranks of executives, Microsoft must make a decision on how much it desires large-scale management experience or deep technical knowledge in its CEO.

On Tuesday, Thompson’s blog emphasized the tech-heavy requirements of the position: “This is a complex role to fill, involving a complex business model and the ability to lead a highly technical organization and work with top technical talent.”