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Microsoft To Acquire Cyber Security Firm Hexadite

May 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Microsoft has made a deal to purchase cyber security firm Hexadite for $100 million, according to Israeli financial news website Calcalist.

Hexadite, headquartered in Boston with its research and development center in Israel, provides technology to automate responses to cyber attacks that it says increases productivity and reduces costs for businesses.

Microsoft officials declined to comment. Officials at Hexadite could not immediately be reach for comment.

Investors in Hexadite include Hewlett Packard Ventures, and venture capital firms TenEleven and YL Ventures.

Microsoft said in January it plans to continue to invest more than $1 billion annually on cyber security research and development in the coming years. Israel has already benefited from that investment.

Apple Update Now Allows Mac Users To Install Windows 10 Creators Version

May 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Apple has updated macOS Sierra to version 10.12.5 with more than three dozen security patches, and a change that allows users install Microsoft’s latest version of Windows 10 on their Macs.

Sierra 10.12.5 “adds support for media-free installation of Windows 10 Creators Update using Boot Camp,” the update’s brief release notes read. Creators Update was the name Microsoft assigned to Windows 10 1703, the upgrade issued last month.

Boot Camp, which is baked into macOS, lets Mac owners run Windows on their machines. A Windows license is required. Boot Camp, while not virtualization software like VMware’s Fusion or Parallels International’s Parallels Desktop, serves the same purpose: Running Windows applications, including custom or mission-critical corporate software, on a Mac personal computer.

Previously, Mac users were forced onto a circuitous road to put Windows 10 Creators Update into Boot Camp. According to a Microsoft support document published before the upgrade was released, Mac owners first had to install an .iso of 2016’s Windows 10 Anniversary Update, aka 1607, to Boot Camp. Once 1607 was in place, they could then upgrade Windows 10 to 1703 from within Boot Camp.

Monday’s macOS update voids that workaround: Mac owners may instead directly install a disk image — in .iso format — of Windows 10 1703 into Boot Camp.

Sierra 10.12.5 also patched 37 vulnerabilities in macOS. Apple also released security updates for Sierra’s two predecessors, 2015’s macOS El Capitan and 2014’s macOS Yosemite.

First Of Its Kind Digital Control Tower Coming To London Airport

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Within two years, air traffic controllers in London won’t see your plane through a window but will guide it down from screens 70 miles away as the airport becomes one of the first in a major capital to use a digital control tower.

Staff will monitor planes with the help of high-tech 360-degree cameras and sensors fitted to a newly constructed tower, with data and a panoramic views all feeding through to the national air traffic control center in the southern town of Swanwick.

The airport, which is undergoing a 350 million pound ($455 million) expansion, is located near the Canary Wharf financial center in east London and used by over 4.5 million passengers mainly for business travel between Europe’s major centers.

But from 2019, controllers will be based over 110 km away where the airport says an array of digital tools will improve their awareness of situations and efficiency, allowing for quick decision-making.

“A pioneering new digital air traffic control system will enhance safety and improve resilience, setting a new standard for the global aviation industry to follow,” London City Airport Chief Executive Declan Collier said.

“This cutting edge proven technology future-proofs London City Airport’s air traffic control for the next 30 years and beyond,” he said.

The current control tower is reaching the end of its operational lifespan, he said, with the new technology already in use at Sweden’s smaller Ornskoldsvik and Sundsvall airports.

Controllers will be equipped with a range of tools including a close-up view of aeroplane movements along the 1.5-km runway and cameras which can zoom in up to 30 times for close inspection.

Pictures from the airfield and data will be sent through independent and secure fiber networks to the operations room in Swanwick, the airport said.

The technology is supplied by Saab Digital Air Traffic Solutions, a partnership between LFV, the Swedish air navigation service provider, and military defense and civil security firm Saab.

The airport, bought last year by a consortium including Canadian pension funds, is due to expand as part of a development program which will see an extra two million people flying to and from it every year by 2025 and an additional 30,000 annual flights.

Construction of the 50-metre digital tower will begin later this year and is due to be completed in 2018, followed by a year of testing and training before it becomes fully operational.

Companies Look To Kidnap Insurance Policies To Cover Ransomware Attacks

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Companies lacking cyber insurance are beginning to rely on policies covering kidnap, ransom and extortion in the world’s political hotspots to recoup losses caused by ransomware viruses such as “WannaCry”, insurers say.

Cyber insurance can be expensive to buy and is not widely used outside the United States, with one insurer previously describing the cost as $100,000 for $10 million in data breach insurance.

Some companies do not even consider it because they do not think they are targets.

The kidnap policies, known as K&R coverage, are typically used by multinational companies looking to protect their staff in areas where violence related to oil and mining operations is common, such as parts of Africa and Latin America.

Companies could also tap them to cover losses following the WannaCry attack, which used malicious software, known as ransomware, to lock up more than 200,000 computers in more than 150 countries, and demand payments to free them up.

Pay-outs on K&R for ransomware attacks may be lower and the policies less suitable than those offered by traditional cyber insurance, insurers say.

“There will be some creative forensic lawyers who will be looking at policies,” said Patrick Gage, chief underwriting officer at CNA Hardy, a specialist commercial insurer, in London.

He added, however, that given that K&R policies are geared towards a threat to lives, “our absolute preference is that people buy specific cover, rather than relying on insurance coverage that is not specific”.

American International Group Inc, Hiscox Ltd and the Travelers Companies Inc have been receiving ransomware claims from some customers with K&R policies as ransomware attacks become more common, the companies said.

The insurers declined to comment on total claims, citing confidentiality and client security concerns.

“We are seeing claims (over the past 18 months) but not a huge uptick,” a Hiscox spokeswoman said. “These are within expectations and entirely manageable.”

She declined to say whether the firm had seen any such claims from the WannaCry attacks though Tom Harvey, an expert in cyber risk management at catastrophe modeling firm RMS, said “insurers with kidnap and ransom books will want to look closely at their policy wordings to see whether they are exposed.”

A sharp rise in ransomware attacks in the past 18 months has driven companies to use K&R policies to cover some of their damages if they do not have direct cyber coverage or cannot meet initial cyber policy deductible costs, insurers said.

Symantec Corp, a cyber security firm based in Mountain View in California, observed over 460,000 ransomware attempts in 2016, up 36 percent from 2015, the company said. The average payment demand ballooned from $294 to $1,077, a 266 percent increase.

But as the threat mounts, K&R insurers are at risk from steeper claims than they had anticipated. They are responding by making changes to their policies, which were not designed around ransomware, insurance brokers said.

Is Intel Worried About McAfee

May 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Intel is fuming that MGT Capital Investments went ahead with the announcement of the “John McAfee Privacy Phone” when it previously said that it did not plan to launch products and services under the McAfee mark.

For those who came in late MGT Capital Investments is owned by John McAfee who sold the trademark and which ended up in the claws of Intel. Intel, which once claimed to own the letter i, is now insisting that McAfee can’t use his name on products.

The federal court had earlier refused John McAfee and MGT Capital a preliminary injunction until the resolution of the dispute on Intel’s transfer of marks and related assets containing the word McAfee as part of the spin-out.

MGT announced last month a privacy phone that will be “as hack proof as humanly possible,” with features such as a bank of switches on the back cover that will allow the user to physically disconnect the battery, the antennas for Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and geolocation, the camera and microphone, and would also not allow the phone to connect to a Stingray or any other IMSI (International Mobile Subscriber Identity) catcher device.

McAfee wants his phone in the shops by August and has referred to the phone largely as the Privacy Phone.

But in a sentence lower down in the statement on its website it refers to “the John McAfee privacy phone,” which appears to have raised Intel’s concerns about the naming of the phone. John McAfee also referred to “The John McAfee Privacy Phone, by MGT,” in a tweet last month.

Lawyers for Intel and McAfee have also objected to MGT asking for the depositions of McAfee’s CEO, Christopher Young, and Intel’s CEO, Brian Krzanich, “even though Plaintiffs can point to no relevant, unique information that these chief executives possess.”

The companies have moaned that MGT and John McAfee have not produced required documents for discovery and asked for a conference in connection with a motion for a protective order to prevent the “harassing depositions” of the chief executives and another motion to compel MGT and John McAfee to “complete their document production and provide substantive responses to interrogatories about their name change and planned products and services.”

John McAfee has said he had entered in 1991 into an agreement with McAfee Associates, a predecessor to McAfee Inc., to transfer certain assets to it in exchange for stock and a promissory note.

But the security expert has told the court that at no point in the agreement had he assigned the rights to his personal name through an assignment of trademark or otherwise, or agreed to restrict his right to do business using his own name. Like most things involving John McAfee this will run and run and give great copy.

Courtesy-Fud

Will Canonical IPO Be A Success?

May 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Linux outfit Canonical appears to have been making rather a lot of changes lately and its founder Mark Shuttleworth said that it is because the company is gearing up for an IPO.

Canonical was doing well with Ubuntu and cloud and container-related technologies, such as Juju, LXD, and Metal-as-a-Service (MaaS).

In addition, its OpenStack and Kubernetes software stacks, according to Shuttleworth, are growing by leaps and bounds on both the public and private cloud.

He said that in the last year, Ubuntu cloud growth had been 70 percent on the private cloud and 90 percent on the public cloud.

“Ubuntu has been gaining more customers on the big five public clouds.”

Canonical’s attempt to make Unity the universal interface for desktops, tablets, and smartphones had failed and while Shuttleworth was personally invested in this project it was not viable when you had an IPO looming.

Other steps are likely as the company works out what steps we need to take towards an IPO.

That means focusing on Canonical’s most profitable lines.

“Ubuntu will never die because it is the default platform on cloud computing. Juju, MaaS, and OpenStack are nearly unstoppable. We need to work out more of our IoT path. At the same time, we had to cut out those parts that could not meet an investors’ needs. The immediate work is get all parts of the company profitable,” Shuttleworth said.

Courtesy-Fud

BlackBerry Focuses Resources On Anti-hacking Tools For Connected Cars

May 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

BlackBerry Ltd collaborating with at least two automakers to develop a security service that would remotely scan vehicles for computer viruses and advise drivers to pull over if they were in critical danger, according to a financial analyst.

The service, which would also be able to install security patches to an idle car, is being tested by luxury automakers Aston Martin and Range Rover, Macquarie analyst Gus Papageorgiou said in a note to clients sent late on Monday.

Auto security is among several areas that BlackBerry is betting will boost its revenue after the Canadian company lost its dominance of the smartphone market to Apple Inc and others over the past decade.

John Wall, the head of BlackBerry’s QNX division, and company spokeswoman Sarah McKinney both declined to comment.

Matthew Clarke, a spokesman for Aston Martin, said in an email he was not aware of the company testing such a product. Representatives with Range Rover’s parent company, Jaguar Land Rover, could not be reached for comment.

The service could be launched as early as next year, generating about $10 a month per vehicle for BlackBerry, according to Papageorgiou, who has followed BlackBerry for more than 15 years.

Vehicles increasingly rely on dozens of computers that connect to each other as well as the internet, mobile networks and Bluetooth communications systems that make them vulnerable to remote hacks.

“Although a connected, more software-centric automobile offers tremendous advantages to consumers, it also opens the doors to hackers,” Papageorgiou wrote in his note.

Automaker interest in cyber security has risen dramatically since 2015, when two hacking experts uncovered vulnerabilities in Fiat Chrysler vehicles that led to a U.S. recall of 1.4 million autos.

Will Digital Video Game Sales Grow This Year

May 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Gaming

The growth of full game downloads in the console space has surprised EA, the firm says.

The company told investors during its Q&A – as transcribed by Seeking Alpha – that full game downloads accounted for 33% of unit sales. That’s considerably ahead of the firm’s previous estimate of 29%, and 9% higher than the figure it posted last year.

The firm says the chief driver was “the continuing evolution of consumer behavior. but some of the out-performance was driven by the shift from Star Wars Battlefront to Battlefield 1, as well as the digital performance of our catalog.”

It expects full game downloads will account for 38% of its console unit sales during 2017.

However, EA’s CFO Blake Jorgensen anticipates that for the whole industry the figure will be even higher – around 40%. This is because EA’s big titles, such as FIFA, often perform strongly in markets with slower digital uptake.

“In terms of full-game downloads, the number surprised us because we had thought that it’d be around the 5% year-over-year growth,” he said. “Some of that may simply be the consumer is shifting faster than we know or we expected. The trends can sometimes jump in dramatic ways and maybe we’re starting to see that overall shift. And some of it could be product-related. We do think the industry will end calendar year 2017 probably above 40%. We will most likely lag that as we have historically because FIFA is such a large product and it is so global that we are operating in markets where either the ability to purchase digitally, or the ability to download based on bandwidth speeds, are compromised and thus we tend to skew a little lower on FIFA than we do on the rest of our portfolio. So we’ve always lagged the industry slightly, but we are excited about the potential that you’re seeing the consumer possibly shift quicker to digital than we’d originally anticipated.”

EA remains optimistic about the console space. It says that at the end of last year the install base for both PS4 and Xbox One was 79m, and that it would grow to 105m by the end of 2017. This figure does not include Nintendo Switch, although EA is bullish about Nintendo, too.

“We have a tremendous relationship with Nintendo and have done for many, many years and are excited by the fact that they have come out very strong and are bringing in a whole new player base into the ecosystem,” said EA CEO Andrew Wilson. “We continue to be bullish on it and are looking at other titles that we might bring to the Switch. Our console number that we quoted does not include the Switch at this point, so anything that Nintendo does is additive to that number.”

There were a few additional takeaway points from EA’s financials. The publisher said that the traditional DLC mode is becoming “less important” as it moves further into live services. We’ve already seen EA evolve its DLC model with Titanfall 2, which is giving away all of its DLC for free.

EA also revealed that its new EA Motive studio in Montreal has 100 staff, and the publisher expects that number will grow to 150.

Courtesy-GI-biz

China Hit Hard By ‘WannaCry’ Ransomware

May 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The WannaCry ransomware has infected tens of thousands of Windows PCs in China, where Windows XP runs one in five systems, according to local reports.

More than 23,000 IP addresses in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) show signs of infection, the country’s National Computer Network Emergency Response Technical Team/Coordination Center (CNCERT) told Xinhua, the state-run news agency, on Monday.

“Intranets in many industries and enterprises involving banking, education, electricity, energy, healthcare and transportation have been affected in different extents,” CNCERT said.

The Hong Kong-based Southern China Morning Post upped the ante in its report Monday, claiming that tens of thousands of businesses and organizations had been hit by the ransomware, which has been dubbed “WannaCry” by most security experts, “WannaCrypt” by a few outliers.

The China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), for example, took some 20,000 gas stations offline early Saturday, forcing customers to pay in cash as credit card purchases could not be processed. By mid-day Sunday, some 20% of the stations were still disconnected from the Internet, but efforts were continuing to restore payment options, the company said in a statement.

It shouldn’t have been a surprise that PCs in the PRC were hit hard by WannaCry: Although security experts have yet to identify the original infection vector, the ransomware spreads rapidly by exploiting Windows vulnerabilities in a baked-in file sharing protocol.

Microsoft patched the flaws in March when it issued MS17-010, one of its last-ever security bulletins. But because Microsoft only supports — patches, in other words — newer editions of its operating system, the 16-year-old Windows XP and the 5-year-old Windows 8 were not bolstered with the same fix.

China is at greater risk of attacks against unpatched Windows XP PCs than most countries because a larger percentage of the nation’s systems run the obsolete OS than the global average.

According to Baidu, the PRC’s largest search provider, 19% of all personal computers using its service last month were powered by Windows XP. That was almost double the share of Windows 10, but less than a third of the share of Windows 7.

Windows XP’s worldwide share was about 7% in April, said U.S. analytics vendor Net Applications earlier this month, about one-fourth the share of Windows 10 and a seventh the share of Windows 7.

Over the weekend, Microsoft issued security updates for Windows 8, Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP, which had had been banished from the patch list one, two and three years ago, respectively. “This decision was made based on an assessment of this situation, with the principle of protecting our customer ecosystem overall, firmly in mind,” Phillip Misner, a principal security group manager at the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRM), said in a post to a company blog.

Electronic Signature Service DocuSign Reports Hacking

May 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Electronic signature service DocuSign revealed that hackers had temporarily gained access to a database that houses customer emails, which the company linked to a surge in phishing emails sent to its users.

The company said the emails imitated the DocuSign brand to trick recipients into opening a Microsoft Word document containing malicious software.

DocuSign’s service is widely used by big bank and insurers for keeping track of financial transactions, with 12 of the top 15 U.S. financial services companies using the company’s software.

The privately held company, valued at about $3 billion, makes software to add legally compliant electronic signatures to documents.

DocuSign said only email addresses were accessed. Names, physical addresses, passwords, social security numbers or credit card data were not accessed, the company said on its website.

San Francisco-based DocuSign said earlier this month that it was tracking the malicious e-mail campaign.

DocuSign has about 200 million users and has been embraced as a quick and secure way to sign contracts and other official documents using a finger on a mobile device.

Will Google Dump Linux For Magenta

May 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Google’s new Fuchsia mobile OS is not based on Linux, unlike Android, but on a new microkernel called Magenta.

According to Ars Technica, Google will not not only be dumping the Linux kernel, but also the GPL.

The new OS will be licensed under a mix of BSD 3 clause, MIT, and Apache 2.0.

Part of the issue is that Google can’t be bothered keeping up with Linux releases. Google Pixel is still stuck on Linux Kernel 3.18, which was first released at the end of 2014.

Fuchsia’s interface and apps are written using Google’s Flutter SDK, a project that actually produces cross-platform code that runs on Android and iOS. Flutter apps are written in Dart, Google’s reboot of JavaScript which, on mobile, has a focus on high-performance, 120fps apps.

It also has a Vulkan-based graphics renderer called “Escher” that lists “Volumetric soft shadows” as one of its features, which seems custom-built to run Google’s shadow-heavy “Material Design” interface guidelines.

Ars put the Flutter SDK to test on an Android device look at the user interface. It found that the home screen is a giant vertically scrolling list. In the center is a profile picture, the date, a city name, and a battery icon.

Above there are ‘Story’ cards, which are basically Recent Apps, and below it is a scrolling list of suggestions, sort of like a Google Now placeholder.

If you leave the main screen and you’ll see a Fuchsia ‘home’ button pop up on the bottom of the screen, which is just a single white circle.

Courtesy-Fud

German Firm Developing Personal Database

May 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

German finance, auto and publishing firms about to form a European company to store personal data securely so customers can make purchases online from different outlets without punching in their details each time.

 The plan mirrors an initiative in the United States by Facebook, which created Facebook Connect to allow logging on to multiple sites with a single identity.

Allianz, Axel Springer, Daimler, Deutsche Bank, technology think-tank Core, and location services provider Here Technologies signed a declaration of intent to establish a platform for registration, e-identity and data services, the group of firms said on Monday.

“The idea behind the cooperation is to provide a competitive, European response to the platform economy’s main players,” the companies said.

The group of companies said the new venture “aims to guarantee the highest standards in data security and data protection.”

The European initiative was still several months away from being launched, but the group of companies is announcing their plans early in order to attract more partners.

When making purchases online, consumers using the new data store would provide a so-called master key to sellers of goods and services to unlock personal details needed for the transaction.

Christian Sewing, Deutsche Bank’s deputy CEO said that Europeans must at last fully play out our strengths in digitalisation 

“The time is ripe for a platform initiative of this kind. It will increase legal certainty for clients and boost the European digital economy’s growth,” he said.

Courtesy-Fud

Spread Of ‘WannaCry’ Ransomware Halted For Now

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Friday’s unprecedented ransomware attack may have temporarily halted spreading to new machines thanks to a “kill switch” that a security researcher has activated.

The ransomware, called Wana Decryptor or WannaCry, has been found infecting machines across the globe. It works by exploiting a Windows vulnerability that the U.S. National Security Agency may have used for spying.

The malware encrypts data on a PC and shows users a note demanding $300 in bitcoin to have their data decrypted. Images of the ransom note have been circulating on Twitter. Security experts have detected tens of thousands of attacks, apparently spreading over LANs and the internet like a computer worm.

However, the ransomware also contains a kill switch that may have backfired on its developers, according to security researchers.

Wana Decryptor infects systems through a malicious program that first tries to connect to an unregistered web domain. The kill switch appears to work like this: If the malicious program can’t connect to the domain, it’ll proceed with the infection. If the connection succeeds, the program will stop the attack.

A security researcher who goes by the name MalwareTech found that he could activate the kill switch by registering the web domain and posting a page on it.

MalwareTech’s original intention was to track the ransomware’s spread through the domain it was contacting. “It came to light that a side effect of us registering the domain stopped the spread of the infection,” he said in an email.

Security firm Malwarebytes and Cisco’s Talos security group reported the same findings and said new ransomware infections appear to have slowed since the kill switch was activated.

However, Malwarebytes researcher Jerome Segura said it’s too early to tell whether the kill switch will stop the Wana Decryptor attack for good. He warned that other versions of the same ransomware strain may be out there that have fixed the kill-switch problem or are configured to contact another web domain.

Unfortunately, computers already infected with Wana Decryptor will remain infected, he said.

Friday’s ransomware attack first spread through a massive email phishing campaign. At least some of those emails appeared to be messages from a bank about a money transfer, according to Cisco’s Talos group.

Victims who opened the attachment in the email were served with the ransomware, which takes over the computer, security researchers said.

The Wana Decryptor itself is no different from other typical ransomware strains. Once it infects the PC, it’ll encrypt all the files on the machine, and then demand the victim pay a ransom to free them.

But unlike other ransomware, Wana Decryptor has been built to spread quickly. It does so by incorporating a hacking tool that security researchers suspect came from the NSA and was leaked online last month.

Has AACS 2.0 Encryption Been Cracked

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Smurfs have made a mockery of the AACS 2.0 encryption used to protect UHD Blu-ray disks.

A cracked copy of a UHD Blu-ray disc surfaced on the HD-focused BitTorrent tracker UltraHDclub. The torrent in question is a copy of the Smurfs 2 film and is tagged “The Smurfs 2 (2013) 2160p UHD Blu-ray HEVC Atmos 7.1-THRONE”.

This suggests that AACS 2.0 may have been “cracked” although there are no further technical details provided at this point.

UltraHDclub is proud of the release, though, and boasts of having the “First Ultra HD Blu-ray Disc in the NET!”

It will take a while to download the 53.30 GB disk and there are few seeders which means it will take a while. But after you do… you have a bloody Smurf movie!

Torrent Freak said that while the audio seems to match, the Maximum Content Light Level and Maximum Frame-Average Light Level listed in the media info appear to be different, and the colours in the screenshots are off too.

But this is not the first time that we have heard a rumour that the AACS 2.0 has been broken.

If the encryption has indeed been broken it will be bad news for AACS, the decryption licensing outfit that controls it. The company, founded by a group of movie studios and technology partners including Warner Bros, Disney, Microsoft and Intel, has put a lot of effort into making the technology secure.

Courtesy-Fud

Microsoft Ending Support For First Version Of Windows 10

May 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Microsoft has published the very last security update for the debut version of Windows 10.

Windows 10 1507 — Microsoft tags feature upgrades with a yymm label — will received its last security patches on May 9. The retirement date had been quietly announced last month when it appeared on several support documents.

“The time has now come to end servicing for version 1507,” one of those documents stated.

The company’s selection of May 9, as well as answers several officials gave last week during an online Q&A, signal that it will retire Windows 10’s versions on Patch Tuesdays, just as it has ended support for other OS editions on those 12 days throughout the year.

Stopping support for Windows 10 editions is as important to Microsoft’s “Windows-as-a-service” model as is its cadence of shipping two feature upgrades annually. The company has pledged to support an individual edition, such as 1507, for just 18 months, not the 10 years it provided for previous Windows editions.

The cut-off guaranteed Microsoft would not be burdened by a requirement to maintain an increasing number of versions, letting it instead focus on just two iterations of Windows 10 at a time.

In the end, Microsoft supported Windows 10 1507 for 21 months rather than the pledged 18.

Using the 18-month lifecycle, Windows 10’s second edition, version 1511 — released Nov. 12, 2015 — should also fall from support this month. But because of other arcane rules Microsoft follows, 1511 will be supported at least through October, according to Nathan Mercer, a senior product marketing manager, in a reply during last week’s Q&A.

That would provide 1511 with two years of support.

Microsoft hasn’t set end-of-support dates for Windows 10 1607 or 1703, the upgrades released in August 2016 and April 2017. Under the 18-month guideline, 1607 should head to retirement in January 2018 and 1703 shuffle off in September 2018. However, it’s likely that Microsoft will extend 1607’s date of demise, as it did to 1507 and 1511, to separate it from the latter.

Windows 10 1507 LTSB — the “Long-term Servicing Branch” version of the original release — will continue to receive security updates, Microsoft has said. The LTSB track is available only to customers running Windows 10 Enterprise.

Although Windows 10 1507 will continue to operate without restrictions after May 9th, without future bug fixes, the operating system “could become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses,” Microsoft warned. To continue to receive updates, users must upgrade to 1511 or later.

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