Subscribe to:

Subscribe to :: TheGuruReview.net ::

Yahoo Out, Google In For Firefox Corporate Browser

November 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Alphabet Inc’s Google picked up a previous location as the default search engine on Mozilla Corp’s Firefox Internet browser in the United States and other regions as the browser maker stunned Verizon Communication Inc’s Yahoo by canceling their deal.

Google confirmed the move but declined, along with Mozilla, to disclose revenue-sharing terms of the multiyear agreement. Google’s growing spending to be the primary search provider on apps and devices such as Apple Inc’s iPhone has been a major investor concern.

 Google will be Firefox’s default search provider on desktop and mobile in the United States, Canada, Hong Kong and Taiwan, said Denelle Dixon, Mozilla’s chief business and legal officer.

The decision was “based on a number of factors including doing what’s best for our brand, our effort to provide quality web search and the broader content experience for our users,” Dixon said. “We believe there are opportunities to work with Oath and Verizon outside of search.”

Verizon said Mozilla terminating the Yahoo agreement caught it off guard.

“We are surprised that Mozilla has decided to take another path, and we are in discussions with them regarding the terms of our agreement,” said Charles Stewart, a spokesman for Verizon’s Oath unit, which oversees Yahoo.

The search provider switch came as Mozilla announced Firefox Quantum, a faster, new version of the browser that company says is “30 percent lighter” than Google Chrome in that it uses less computer memory.

For a decade until 2014, Google had been Firefox’s worldwide search provider. Google then remained the default in Europe while regional rivals such as Yahoo, Russia’s Yandex and China’s Baidu Inc replaced it elsewhere.

Former Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer won a five-year contract with Mozilla in 2014 when Firefox and Google’s Chrome browser were battling for users.

 Chrome’s U.S. market share has since doubled to about 60 percent, according to data from analytics provider StatCounter, with Mozilla, Apple Inc and Microsoft Corp browsers capturing the rest.

Yahoo paid Mozilla $375 million in 2015 and said that it would pay at least the same amount annually through 2019, according to regulatory filings.

Yahoo and Google aim to recoup placement fees by selling ads alongside search results and collecting valuable user data. Google said in October that contract changes drove a 54 percent increase in such fees to $2.4 billion in the third quarter.

 

Google AI Scores Grade School Level Intelligence Rating

October 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Google’s AlphaGo may have defeated Ke Jie to become the Go world champion but it’s no smarter than a kindergartner.

A recently published study showed Google’s artificial intelligence technology scored best out of 50 systems that Chinese researchers tested against an AI scale they created, although it’s still no smarter than a six-year-old, CNBC reportedMonday. At 47.28, it’s almost twice as smart as Apple’s virtual assistant, Siri.

AI systems have developed so quickly that it’s been able to act as an assistant, take an exam and even outperform us at strategy games. But the results downplay the concerns of “AI worriers” who have been uneasy about how fast it’s progressing.

To evaluate how smart an intelligent system is (or has become), its ability to “acquire, master, create and feedback knowledge” has to be tested, wrote the researchers. The IQ of 50 AI systems including Google’s AI, Siri, and Chinese search engine, Baidu, as well as three humans aged 18, 12 and six, were rated in 2014. When the authors took the scores of the AI systems again in 2016, they found that Google was the smartest in years and had improved the fastest (from 26.5 to 47.28), but it wasn’t enough to beat even a six year-old who came in with a score of 55.5.

The test also rated Google’s AlphaGo, the search giant’s AI system developed to play Go, against the authors’ intelligence grade model. AlphaGo was found to be in the third grade, which the authors say is two grades lower than that of humans.

Notable “AI worriers” include physicist Stephen Hawking and Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO, Elon Musk, who both won the 2015 Luddite Award and were branded AI “alarmists.” Hawking is a firm believer that AI could pose a real danger depending on who controls it, and argues that it could outsmart us and end humanity. Musk agrees there’s significant risk and asked for regulation in July, going as far as to suggest AI could start World War III. Alibaba founder and executive chairman, Jack Ma, thought companies could be helmed by AI systems in the next three decades.

Google’s Mobile App Gets New Look, Feel

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Google has announced a re-tooling of its search app on mobile phones to include a personalized feed of links about hobbies, travel, sports and other topics, a move that puts the search company into more direct competition with social networks such as Facebook.

Google, the world’s largest search engine and a unit of Alphabet Inc, said the changes would begin rolling out in the United States on Wednesday and other countries in the coming weeks.

The new offering is called “Google Feed,” a name that may conjure comparisons to Facebook’s “News Feed,” a feature on Facebook used to browse updates from friends, family and other sources.

Google said, however, that it was not trying to duplicate Facebook Inc, the world’s largest social network. Instead, the company said it wanted to create another place to see a stream of relevant search results.

“This feed is really about your interests … It’s not really about what your friends are interested in,” Ben Gomes, a Google vice president for engineering, said in a briefing with reporters.

Typical updates might include a link to a website with tips about an upcoming vacation spot, or a link to a page about cycling or another hobby, the company said.

Facebook and Google are jockeying for attention online and by extension, for advertising revenue based on those eyeballs. The two Silicon Valley companies are expected to take in some 50 percent of overall online ad spending in 2018, according to research firm eMarketer.

There were no immediate plans to include advertising in Google Feed, Gomes said.

Google Feed will suggest links based on a user’s Google search history as well as data from other Google services, such as YouTube, Gmail and Google Calendar, the company said.

In addition to putting Google Feed on mobile apps, the company is looking at attaching it to web browsers in some form, Shashi Thakur, a second Google vice president for engineering, said during the briefing.

Is Comcast Being Malicious

July 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A small Texas cable minnow is suing giant rival Comcast for allegedly sabotaging it out of business.

A lawsuit filed in Harris County District Court by Telecom Cable LLC claims that contractors working for Comcast had ‘destroyed’ his underground cabling over a six week period.

Anthony Luna, the owner of the now-defunct company, had just 230 homes in his network, and in common with most cable companies had been working with exclusivity to his region until Comcast decided to expand to the Weston Lakes region which he served.

In an attempt to prevent any issues with the cable laying, Luna claims he marked his underground lines in orange paint and “buried cable” markers. He also says he emailed Comcast a map of the system.

However, the suit claims that Comcast’s contractors, Aspen Utility Company, LLC and A&A Cable Contractors Inc ignored (or didn’t receive) the warnings, and ripped up his cable network in the process of planting the Comcast lines.

It is alleged that Mr Luna was offered a purchase of his telecoms system at below market value, and when he refused, Comcast began planting its own system and then went rogue.

Luna is seeking compensation for the destruction of his entire business. He relocated his family to New York and “the best paying job he could find” but is earning less than he made from the cable network.

The suit claims, “Telecom attempted to keep up with this campaign of destruction and used over 4000 feet of cable repairing what Defendants had destroyed, but there was no way to obtain replacement cable and re-install its entire system in time to keep its customer base. As Comcast well knows, cable television and Internet customers will not wait indefinitely for resumption of their service.”

It is believed that the vast majority of Luna’s customers switched to the newly installed Comcast service. Comcast, already widely seen as a villain in tech circles, is accused of counts of various types of negligence, including gross negligence, aiding and abetting and civil conspiracy. It is denying all charges and has confirmed that it intends to fight Mr Luna all the way.

At a time when cable companies are already the bad guys because of the expected abolishing of net neutrality in the coming weeks, stories of supposed corporate bullying of mom and pop businesses are not a welcome sign of the shape of things to come.

Courtesy-TheInq

EU Court Tackles ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ Again

May 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The “right to be forgotten” – or prohibiting certain web search results from appearing under searches for people’s names – will be debated at the European Union’s top court after Alphabet Inc’s Google refused requests from four individuals.

In May 2014, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) ruled that people could ask search engines, such as Google and Microsoft’s Bing, to remove inadequate or irrelevant information from web results appearing under searches for people’s names – dubbed the “right to be forgotten”.

Google has since received over 720,000 removal requests and accepted about 43 percent of them, according to its transparency report.

Four individuals who had asked Google to remove links to webpages about them appealed to the French data protection authority after the search engine company refused their request.

The French privacy regulator, the CNIL, agreed with Google’s decision, prompting the individuals to take their case to the French Conseil d’Etat, France’s supreme administrative court, which referred it to the Luxembourg-based ECJ.

The ECJ “now has to decide whether ‘sensitive personal data’ — such as the political allegiance of an individual, or a past criminal conviction reported in the press — should always outweigh the public interest”, Google’s senior privacy counsel Peter Fleischer wrote in a blogpost.

“Requiring automatic delisting from search engines, without any public interest balancing test, risks creating a dangerous loophole. Such a loophole would enable anyone to demand removal of links that should remain up in the public interest, simply by claiming they contain some element of sensitive personal data.”

A Conseil de’Etat statement said the requests from the individuals concerned a video that “explicitly revealed the nature of the relationship that an applicant was deemed to have entertained with a person holding a public office”; a press article on the suicide of a member of the Church of Scientology mentioning that one of the applicants was the public relations manager of that church; several articles related to criminal proceedings of an applicant; and articles about the conviction of another applicant for having sexually abused minors.

The French court said a number of “serious issues” had arisen with regard to the interpretation of European law in the case before it.

“Such issues are in relation with the obligations applying to the operator of a search engine with regard to web pages that contain sensitive data, when collecting and processing such information is illegal or very narrowly framed by legislation, on the grounds of its content relating to sexual orientations, political, religious or philosophical opinions, criminal offences, convictions or safety measures,” the court said.

The CNIl declined comment at this point of the court procedure.

The case number is C-136/17. A date for the hearing has not been set.

“We will be advocating strongly for the public interest balancing test to apply to all types of delisting requests—including those containing sensitive personal data,” Fleischer said.

Will Comcast Streaming Service Be A Success?

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A  report from Reuters shows that Comcast is gearing up to relaunch its IPTV streaming service under a new name that will be available to all Comcast internet subscribers across the US.

The company originally launched a streaming TV service in a few select cities in July 2015 under the name Stream that allowed Xfinity customers to pay $15 a month on top of their internet bill to watch shows from a dozen networks on tablets, laptops and smartphones. The relaunched TV streaming service will be called Xfinity Instant TV and will start at the same monthly price for major channels including ABC, NBC, ESPN and others, but could go up to $40 per month based on additional channel packages.

The initial rollout will be somewhat limited to a collection of cities within five states, including Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Hampshire. In addition, Comcast plans to make the rollout only available to households already paying for its own internet service. Some reports have argued that this requirement is grounds for violating basic net neutrality principles, as the service would be getting preferred treatment compared to other internet traffic. Back in 2015 under the Stream name, a Comcast representative commented that the service is delivered over the company’s “managed network,” which essentially means that it will not count towards a Comcast subscriber’s monthly Internet data caps.

Comcast has rebutted this claim by stating that its streaming TV service is not an internet service, but is “functionally equivalent” to a streaming TV service. The requirement of having an existing Xfinity home broadband connection underscores any arguments of a violation of net neutrality, as the service is passed from a broadband modem and is delivered to phones, tablets and PCs. Although the service would not count against a customer’s data caps, it would still favor the company’s own streaming service over anything else.

Recently, the incoming FCC administration has dropped inquiries related to services that allow customers to stream music and video without counting toward a data plan limit, also known as “zero-rating”. Some notable names involved in this scheme include AT&T’s Sponsored Data and Data Perks programs, Verizon’s FreeBee Data 360 program, and Comcast’s Stream TV service. Net neutrality advocates have stated that such programs harm competition by “unfairly marginalizing” other competing services. Though in the case of Comcast, it is only allowing current subscribers access to IPTV streaming service at home and only with service originating from a connected broadband modem.

Comcast’s Xfinity Instant TV service has not yet been announced, though it is likely going to be rolled out into more markets across the US by the end of 2017. Under the company’s zero-rating policy using home broadband modems, it is not difficult to envision a broader internet landscape in the US characterized by a theoretical lack of net neutrality that still bends in favor of one terrestrial ISP option over another.

Courtesy-Fud

Intel Goes To The Cloud With Alibaba

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Alibaba Cloud (Aliyun), has announced a pilot program with Chipzilla for a cloud-based FPGA (field programmable gate array) acceleration service with the goal of enabling customers to have virtual access to powerful compute resources in the cloud to help them manage business, scientific and enterprise data application workloads more effectively.

By using Intel Arria 10 FPGAs, Intel Xeon processor-based servers and software development tools for application acceleration as a ready-to-go preconfigured infrastructure, Alibaba Cloud offers systems designers cloud-based workload acceleration as an alternative to investing in on-premises FPGA infrastructure.

The service delivers on-demand scalability of workload acceleration with FPGAs while reducing upfront investment risks and accelerating delivery of new infrastructure services.

Senior director, Alibaba Cloud the appropriately named Jin Li said that Alibaba Cloud offers customers access to a number of services in the cloud, and adding an FPGA-based acceleration offering means they can access it without the cost or requirement of building out their own infrastructure.

“This service greatly adds to our value as a leading provider of highly scalable cloud computing and data management services that provide businesses with flexible, reliable connectivity,” Jin said.

One of the key benefits of FPGAs is that they are programmable and can be customized to accelerate and scale for varying workloads, such as machine learning, data encryption and media transcode.

Dan McNamara, corporate vice president and general manager, Intel Programmable Solutions Group said that Intel FPGAs were enabling new business models such as Alibaba’s approach of using FPGAs to accelerate diverse workloads via cloud services.

“In addition, Intel offers customers scalable solutions for accelerated computing with its data center leadership in Intel Xeon processors, FPGAs, optimized tools and software, and a global partner ecosystem across the spectrum of deployment models.”

Courtesy-Fud

Apple Joins Wireless Power Consortium

February 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Apple has joined the consortium responsible for the Qi wireless charging system, heating up rumors that owners of future  iPhones could live tangle-free.

Last week, a financial analyst claimed Apple will release three new iPhones with wireless charging capabilities this year, reviving an on-again, off-again rumor about the next-generation iPhone’s capabilities.

The appearance of Apple’s name on the membership list of the Wireless Power Consortium, Qi’s creator, over the last week adds credence to that rumor. Its name was not on the list cached by Google’s search engine last Tuesday.

“After several years of increasing rumor, Apple’s membership with the Wireless Power Consortium points strongly to the expectation that the next iPhone will include wireless charging technology,” said Vicky Yussuff, an analyst at market watcher IHS Technology.

Don’t expect too much, though: That’s pretty much what IHS analysts said about the last iPhone, too.

In fact, Apple’s membership of the WPC may have nothing to do with phones. The magnetic charging adapter supplied with the Apple Watch will charge Qi devices (although the Watch itself is programmed not to work with just any Qi charger, only those supplied or approved by Apple) so membership may just be a delayed recognition of that usage.

Nine in 10 consumers want wireless charging on their next phone, according to Yussuff. The technology is now so widely adopted that it’s no longer something Apple can ignore, she added.

IHS expects around 350 million wireless-chargeable devices to ship this year, in a market largely driven by Samsung Electronics, which has included the capability in its top-of-the-range phones since the launch of the Galaxy S6 in 2015. Samsung also sells wireless charging covers for the older S4 and S5.

 

Mozilla’s Promises To Rejuvenate Firefox With Project Quantum

November 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

firefox-10-150x150Mozilla last week named its next-generation browser engine project and said it would implement the new technology in Firefox next year.

Dubbed Quantum, the new engine will include several components from Servo, the browser rendering engine that Mozilla has sponsored, and been working on, since 2013. Written with Rust, Servo was envisioned as a replacement for Firefox’s long-standing Gecko engine. Both Servo and Rust originated at Mozilla’s research group.

“Project Quantum is about developing a next-generation engine that will meet the demands of tomorrow’s web by taking full advantage of all the processing power in your modern devices,” said David Bryant, the head of Firefox engineering, in a piece published Thursday on Medium.

Mozilla plans to start with the existing Gecko engine, said Bryant, but replace the pieces that will most benefit from offloading chores to the graphics processor unit (GPU) or from splitting tasks among the multiple cores found in the bulk of today’s CPUs (central processing units). From Bryant’s description, Mozilla will start slowly, replacing a few Gecko components with ones from Servo at the start, then adapt and adopt others as Quantum progresses.

“Quantum is an ambitious project, but users won’t have to wait long to start seeing improvements roll out,” claimed Bryant. “We’re going to ship major improvements next year, and we’ll iterate from there.”

Bryant promised a very different Firefox, one that would be noticeably quicker to render pages and run web apps. “Pages will load faster, and scrolling will be silky smooth. Animations and interactive apps will respond instantly, and be able to handle more intensive content while holding consistent frame rates,” he wrote.

Mozilla has been working both sides of the browser street in its Firefox modernization: The rendering engine and the user interface/user experience (UI/UX). While Quantum is the former, a different project labeled Tofino unveiled in April was to come up with a next-generation UI/UX. The open-source developer hasn’t shared any Tofino updates since mid-July.

The Quantum-powered Firefox will eventually be released in versions for Windows, macOS, Linux and Android. iOS remains out of bounds because Apple requires that all rivals use the engine of its Safari browser.

Google’s Safe Browsing To Provide Compromised Websites More Information

September 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

google-safe-browsing-logo-150x150Google is now providing more information to webmasters whose online properties are temporarily tagged as unsafe by its Safe Browsing technology as a way to help them fix the identified problems faster.

Google Safe Browsing is a technology used by Google’s search engine, the Google Chrome browser, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, and Android to steer users away from websites that host malicious or deceptive content.

On the back-end, Google uses robots to scan the web and build a list of websites that host malware, harmful downloads, or deceptive ads and pages. Software developers can then plug into an API to integrate this list into their own applications.

The problem is that many websites hosting malware or bad ads don’t do so intentionally but were hacked by attackers. The owners of those websites can ask Google to rescan their properties and have them removed from the Safe Browsing blacklist once the security problems have been corrected.

Unfortunately, the review process is not always straightforward, because some website owners might not completely understand the issues affecting their websites and often fail to completely clean the malicious content.

To help reduce the number of such cases, Google has now updated the information available in its Search Console service to provide clearer explanations about six types of security issues that could be detected on a website, the Google Safe Browsing Team said in a blog post Tuesday.

“These explanations give webmasters more context and detail about what Safe Browsing found,” the team said, “We also offer tailored recommendations for each type of issue, including sample URLs that webmasters can check to identify the source of the issue, as well as specific remediation actions webmasters can take to resolve the issue.”

Webmasters are encouraged to proactively register their websites in the Search Console even if those websites have never been affected by a security issue. This will save them time when something does happen because Google will send notifications through the service as soon as Safe Browsing detects a problem

Google estimates that more than a billion users are protected by its Safe Browsing technology, and more than 60 million of them encounter Safe Browsing warnings on a weekly basis.

Google’s Transparency Reports Uptick In Governments Requesting User Data

July 21, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Government requests worldwide for user data related to search engine traffic on Google surged by 29% from 2014 to 2015, according to the search site’s most recent Transparency Report.

Google reports on the government requests every six months. In the second half of 2015, it said it received more than 40,000 requests for data related to more than 81,000 user accounts; That compares to the first half of the year when Google received about 35,000 requests related to about 69,000 accounts.

In the second half of 2014, Google received 31,140 requests from U.S. entities for user information related to more than 50,000 accounts.

“Usage of our services [has] increased every year, and so have the user data request numbers,” Google said.

By far, the U.S. leads the world in government requests for data: it submitted 27,157 requests related to 12,523 user accounts in the second half of last year. The next highest country was Ireland with 12,114 requests, followed by Germany with 11,562 reqeusts.

Google agreed to hand over “some” user data for 64% of the requests worldwide, but it handed over data for U.S. government requests 79% of the time.

Several search engines and social media sites voluntarily offer annual or semi-annual transparency reports related to state and federal law enforcement information requests about user data.

Google has been publishing its semi-annual Transparency Report since 2011; the latest statistics show that requests for user data is at an all-time high.

In 2014, Apple, Microsoft, and Google were among 10 top tech companies that signed  a letter backing passage of the USA Freedom Act, which would curtail bulk collection of Internet metadata by government agencies.

Passed in June 2015, the USA Freedom Act now requires transparency when the government demands user information from technology companies. Nevertheless, the Electronic Frontier Foundation said there still needs to be more transparency when it comes to government-mandated back doors, as well as what deleted data is kept around in case government agents seek it in the future.

 

 

 

Mozilla Establishes Fund To Audit Open-source Code

June 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

A new Mozilla fund, named Secure Open Source, will provide security audits of open-source code, following the discovery of critical security bugs like Heartbleed and Shellshock in key pieces of the software.

Mozilla has set up a $500,000 initial fund that will be used for paying professional security firms to audit project code. The foundation will also work with the people maintaining the project to support and implement fixes and manage disclosures, while also paying for the verification of the remediation to ensure that identified bugs have been fixed.

The initial fund will cover audits of  some widely-used open source libraries and programs.

The move is a recognition of the growing use of open-source software for critical applications and services by  businesses, government and educational institutions. “From Google and Microsoft to the United Nations, open source code is now tightly woven into the fabric of the software that powers the world. Indeed, much of the Internet – including the network infrastructure that supports it – runs using open source technologies,” wrote Chris Riley, Mozilla’s head of public policy.

Mozilla is hoping that the companies and governments that use open source will join it and provide additional funding for the project.

In a trial of the SOS program on three pieces of open-source software, Mozilla said it found and fixed 43 bugs, including a critical vulnerability and two issues in connection with a widely-used image file format. “These initial results confirm our investment hypothesis, and we’re excited to learn more as we open for applications,” Riley wrote.

The SOS fund “fills a critical gap in cybersecurity by creating incentives to find the bugs in open source and letting people fix them,” said James A. Lewis, senior vice president and director of the Strategic Technologies Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in a statement.

The SOS is part of a larger program, called Mozilla Open Source Support, launched by Mozilla in October last year to support open source and free software development. MOSS has an annual budget of about $3 million.

To qualify for SOS funding, the software must be open source or free software, with the appropriate licenses and approvals, and must be actively maintained. Some of the other factors that will be considered are whether a project is already corporate backed, how commonly is the software used, whether it is network-facing or regularly processes untrusted data, and its importance to the continued functioning of the Internet or the Web.

 

 

 

 

The FTC Focusing On Google’s Search Engine Dominance Again

May 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission officials are asking questions again about the possibility that Alphabet Inc’s Google has abused its dominance in the Internet search market, Politico reported, citing sources familiar with the discussions.

The FTC’s senior antitrust officials have discussed the matter in recent months with representatives of a major U.S. company, which objects to Google’s practices, Politico reported.

The inquiry appears to be in the early, information-gathering stage, the news website reported.

The regulators ended their earlier investigation in January 2013, saying that the company had not manipulated its Web search results to hurt rivals.

Google declined to comment. The FTC could not be immediately reached for comment.

 

 

EU Seeks Greater Transparency In Web Search Results

April 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The European Union’s digital chief wants search engines such as Alphabet Inc’s Google and Microsoft’s Bing to be more transparent about paid ads in web search results but ruled out a separate law for web platforms.

European Commission Vice-President Andrus Ansip, who is overseeing a wide-ranging inquiry into how web platforms conduct their business, said on Friday the EU executive would not take a horizontal approach to regulating online services.

“We will take a problem-driven approach,” Ansip said. “It’s practically impossible to regulate all the platforms with one really good single solution.”

That will come as a relief to the web industry, dominated mainly by big U.S. tech firms such as Facebook, Google and Amazon, who lobbied hard against new rules for online platforms and what they saw as an anti-American protectionist backlash.

“We praise the Commission for understanding that a horizontal measure for all platforms is practically impossible,” said Jakob Kucharczyk, director of the Computer & Communications Industry Association which represents the likes of Facebook, Google and Amazon.

“While a lot of online platforms enable economic growth, their business models differ widely.”

However Ansip said he was worried about how transparent some search engines are when displaying ads in search results.

The Commission is also looking into the transparency of paid-for reviews as well as the conditions of use of services such as Google Maps, Apple Inc’s IoS mobile operating system and Google’s Android.

“Maybe it’s not too much to ask for more transparency talking about search engines,” Ansip said.

The EU executive is looking into making rules on taking down illegal content clearer and more effective without making hosting websites such as YouTube directly liable.

“Now musicians ask, please, take it down and keep it down,” Ansip said. “We want to make those rules more clear.”

But the Commission will not change a provision where websites such as Amazon, eBay and Google’s YouTube are not held liable for illegal content that is uploaded on to their systems. They do, however, have a responsibility to take it down once they are notified of it.

The Commission will publish a communication detailing its plans on web platforms in June.

 

 

Adobe Releases A Slew Of Patches For Its Software

October 20, 2015 by  
Filed under Computing

Adobe has released a huge swathe of patches to keep its software from turning on users and turning them over.

Adobe is often at the end of a security criticism stick, and its Flash Player gets beaten across the knuckles repeatedly. You can’t say that the firm does not work to fix these problems. Just check out this bundle of bandages.

The security fixes come with an introduction by the US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US CERT), which carries weight like lead and has seconded the Adobe push with the suggestion, or insistence, that people get their patching priorities in order.

“Adobe has released security updates to address multiple vulnerabilities in Reader, Acrobat and Flash Player. Exploitation of some of these vulnerabilities may allow a remote attacker to take control of an affected system,” said the advisory.

“Users and administrators are encouraged to review Adobe Security Bulletins APSB15-24 and APSB15-25 and apply the necessary updates.”

Security expert Graham Cluley has also gone in on the urgent update angle, saying that all 69 patches are critical and thus need applying to all systems immediately.

Particularly in need of attention, in case you missed it, is fly in the soup software Flash. Adobe Flash problems are like leaves in the wind: they keep floating around and they could hit you in the face.

Flash is losing any welcome it once had, and it is no wonder why as it is bashed like a piñata.

“As this current patching cycle illustrates, researchers continue to find vulnerabilities in Flash by the dozen,” Cluley added.

“I would therefore urge you to implement these updates ASAP before an attacker begins exploiting the vulnerabilities in the wild. It might also be worth enabling Click-to-Play for Flash, or disabling Flash altogether.”

Courtesy-TheInq

 

Next Page »