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Apple Website Ripe For Hacking

June 29, 2011 by Michael  
Filed under Around The Net

According to the Ethical Hacking group YGN, Apple’s website for developers is virtually wide open and gives the opportunity for hackers to introduce malware such asphishing attacks to gain access to subscriber’s vital personal information.

One group known as Networkworld identified three holes on Apple’s website that arbitrary URL redirects, cross-site scripting and HTTP response splitting. That said, these holes could allow hackers to arbitrarily redirect to other websites and make phishing attacks against developers login credentials more successful.

Although the redirect can cause users to visit a malicious site, the original link would appear to come from developer.apple.com. YGN said that it alerted Apple to the problem in late April, and that the company quickly acknowledged getting the report. However Apple has not taken the opportunity to fix the holes.

We will be waiting for YGN to release its discovery in a few days if Apple does not get its act together.

 

Hacker Writes Trojan Horse For Apple’s Mac

February 28, 2011 by mphillips  
Filed under Computing

As Apple’s popularity continues to increase, so too does the malicious interest of hackers in their famed products. Researchers at Sophos say they’ve uncovered a new Trojan horse program written for the Mac.

It’s called the BlackHole RAT (the RAT part is for “remote access Trojan”) and it’s pretty easy to find online in hacking forums, according to Chet Wisniewski a researcher with antivirus vendor Sophos. There’s even a YouTube video demo of the program that details what its capable of doing.

Sophos hasn’t seen the Trojan used in any online attacks -it’s more a bare-bones, proof-of-concept beta program right now – but the software is pretty easy to use, and if a criminal could find a way to get a Mac user to install it, or write attack code that would silently install it on the Mac, it would give him remote control of the hacked machine.

BlackHole is a variant of a Windows Trojan called darkComet, but it appears to have been written by a different developer. The darkComet source code is easily found, so it looks like BlackHole’s author simply took that code and tweaked it so it would run on the Mac, Wisniewski said.

BlackHole is a variant of a Windows Trojan called darkComet, but it appears to have been written by a different developer. The darkComet source code is freely available, so it looks like BlackHole’s author simply took that code and re-tooled it so it would run on the Mac, Wisniewski said.