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Samsung Chips Help Profit Margins

October 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Samsung Electronics  is expected to forecast a record third-quarter profit on Friday thanks to the strong market for memory chips, and as mobile earnings make a killing as rival Apple drops the ball.

The world’s biggest maker of memory chips and mobile phones has been the chief beneficiary of the semiconductor market, as mobile devices and servers demand ever greater processing power.

Brisk sales of the latest Galaxy Note 8 smartphone, launched in mid-September, also are likely to further boost its performance, analysts said.

Doh Hyun-woo, analyst at Mirae Asset Daewoo Securities said: “Samsung’s valuation is still comparatively lower than global competitors and fourth-quarter earnings will improve across the board and keep improving in 2018.”

Samsung’s July-September operating profit is expected to rise to $12.51 billion, according to a Thomson Reuters survey of 19 analysts. That is nearly three times ta year earlier and slightly better than the previous quarter.

Strong global demand for DRAM chips will continue to outpace supply in 2018, while demand for NAND flash chips exceeded supply for six straight quarters as of last month, DRAMeXchange, a division of data provider TrendForce, said.

Samsung’s mobile division is seen posting operating profit of about 3 trillion won, compared to just 100 billion won in the third quarter of 2016. Pre-orders for the Note 8 hit the highest-ever for the Note series.

Lower liquid-crystal display (LCD) panel prices as well as one-off costs are expected to weigh on Samsung’s display business during the third quarter, analysts said.

However, the display business could improve in the fourth quarter on the back of sales of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) panels for new Apple smartphones. However there are signs that Apple might be forced to reduce orders for these as fewer people are interested in its current “popping” iPhone range.

Samsung will only provide estimates for July-September revenue and operating profit on Friday, and will disclose detailed results in late October.

Courtesy-Fud

Is ARM Looking For More Engineers

October 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

ARM has hired more than 1000 new staff members worldwide since it was taken over by Softbank last year, with a large proportion of these in the UK.

According to figures provided by Softbank’s UK Takeover Panel suggest the number of employees in ARM’s UK operation rose from 1,749 to 2,173, while in the rest of the world, its workforce increased from 2,220 to 2,845, bringing the total number of new staff to 1049.

Softbank wants to build ARM’s presence in the UK, fulfilling a commitment made when it lodged its takeover bid last year. At the time, Softbank said it would double the number of staff in both the UK and worldwide and although there’s still a fairly large recruitment campaign to go to hit that number.

Some of the employees now listed as ARM’s were transferred from SoftBank so it is not as great as it appears, however the outfit seems serious about hiring.

The company revealed it continues to operate the business from its UK headquarters in Cambridge and it has opened two new offices in the city.

“This progress on undertakings illustrates not only SoftBank’s ambition to develop ARM into one of the leading global technology companies, but also its commitment to UK jobs and research and development,” a spokesman said.

Courtesy-Fud

Will Samsung Become The Largest Chip Manufacturer This Year

July 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

The days of Intel being the world’s largest chip maker will be over in the second quarter as the mighty Intel has been felled by Samsung.

Nomura Securities said the South Korean consumer electronics maker will likely generate sales of $15.1 billion from semiconductors in the April through June period, higher than the $14.4 billion Intel is expected to have in the same time frame.

Nomura analyst CW Chung thinks Samsung will be the larger chipmaker with sales of $63.6 billion compared to Intel’s estimated $60.5 billion. One of the drivers of Samsung’s chip growth is the increasing prices of memory chips, which are found in everything from smartphones to servers.

“In the mobile era, demand for D-Ram [a type of memory chip] and SSDs [solid state drives] has surged, boosting their prices since last year amid tight supply,” said, an analyst at , in the report. “The memory chip market has grown bigger than the CPU market,” he said.

DRAM chip prices increased 25 percent in the first half of 2017, while NAND flash memory chip prices jumped 15 percent.

Chung thinks average selling prices will continue to increase in the third quarter. But it’s not just sales that are expected to surpass Intel. Nomura is forecasting Samsung will have more of a profit from its chips than Intel during the second quarter, to the tune of $6.6 billion compared to Intel’s $3.9 billion.

Courtesy-Fud

With The Pitfalls Samsung Still Very Profitable

April 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Samsung is better than Apple at making money. Sure, it might not have margins as good as the fruity cargo cult, it might not make as much cash, but it appears to be unstoppable.

How many companies can have the majority of the press against them, produce a phone which caught fire, has its Vice Chairman and several executives locked up for corruption, and still make a pile of dosh which eclipses the sun?

Samsung Electronics is reporting record earnings thanks mostly to its chip division and the quarters ahead could be even better if its newest smartphone, Galaxy S8, is a success.

Samsung is seeing a boom in memory chips and a sudden spike in demand from smartphones and servers.

Shares of Samsung, Asia’s biggest company by market capitalization and the world’s largest memory chip maker is near record highs after gaining nearly 17 percent so far this year, on top of the 43 percent surge in 2016.

Now Wall Street is expecting Samsung’s January-March operating profit to have risen 41 percent from a year earlier to $8.44 billion. This is Samsungs’ highest profit since the third quarter of 2013.

The Galaxy S8 is out from April 21 so the most analysts are predicting even greater profits in the second quarter.

Analysts expect tight supply conditions for memory chips to continue this year, particularly in NAND flash chips used for long-term data storage, keeping Samsung’s margins padded. That leaves the mobile division as the key earnings variable, they said.

It is starting to look like the Note 7 fiasco only delayed Samsung’s march to dominance and the S8 will help Samsung regain its lead over Apple.

If you think all this is par for the course, imagine that if the press hated Apple, Tim Cook was locked up for cutting an illegal deal over a golf course with President Trump and the iPhone 7 caught fire,  It is unlikely that Apple would recover, let alone make record profits. 

Courtesy-Fud

Samsung Preparing 7nm Processor For 2018 Debut

March 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Despite having its CEO behind bars, Samsung will be ready for volume production of its 7nm process node in 2018.

Samsung Electronics demonstrated its foundry technology roadmap at the China Semiconductor Technology International Conference (CSTIC) held in Shanghai on March 12.

Samsung  VP of Technology at Ho-Kyu Kang said that all chipmakers will have a few headaches when trying to move to sub-10nm process technology, and will have a hell of a time improving yield rates for the node.

He said that gate-all-around field-effect transistors (GAA FET) technology will be the approach to overcome the issue.

Samsung will adopt the GAA FET structure to develop its 7nm and 5nm process nodes, said Kang.

Samsung will also use extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography once it achieves a breakthrough in the technology, Kang added.

Samsung’s 7nm process have been earmarked for high-end chip applications such as GPUs, artificial intelligence (AI), servers and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

Kang said that 5nm should be ready for volume production in 2020, Kang unveiled.

Meanwhile Samsung has launched its FD-SOI process technology to provide a low-cost alternative to FinFET technologies, and introduced a 28nm FD-SOI node designed specifically for IoT devices, he added.

Courtesy-Fud

ZapGo Offers Safer Alternative To Lithium-ion Batteries

March 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

New non-flammable, quick-charging batteries unveiled by private startup ZapGo Ltd. could begin showing up in popular smartphones in the next two years.

ZapGo’s carbon-ion batteries promise to be a safe replacement for the billions of lithium-ion batteries already used in smartphones, electric scooters, vehicles and industrial devices. Lithium-ion batteries in several products, including the Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphone, have been banned on many airline flights because they can overheat, catch fire and explode.

ZapGo, based in Oxford UK, showed off its Zap&Go Carbon-Ion cell at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.

The company has been successfully testing the battery technology to power autonomous shuttles used to transport passengers at Heathrow Airport, said ZapGo CEO Stephen Voller in an interview on Wednesday.

In addition, ZapGo showed at CES smaller versions of its batteries used to power an 18-volt handheld drill, a Razor E300 scooter and a cordless cleaner.

Voller said the first iterations of its carbon-ion battery cells will be ready to be used in the iPhone 10 or the Samsung Galaxy S10, expected in about two years. He said various smartphone makers he would not name have shown interest in using carbon-ion instead of lithium-ion, primarily for safety reasons.

“There’s no fire risk at all” with carbon-ion, Voller said. “There’s nothing flammable. Our mantra is [we’re] safer and faster-charging because the batteries are not lithium-based and have nothing inside that will burn.”

Lithium-ion batteries rely on an organic electrolyte that easily catches fire when there’s an electrical short of some kind, he explained. ZapGo instead uses nano-carbon materials, including graphene, as well an ionic electrolyte in its cells.

Is LG Preparing To Battle Samsung?

March 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Samsung and LG are going pretty much head to head as they launch their flagship phones at roughly the same time

LG is going to introduce G6 in Barcelona, Spain on the 26 February and start selling on the 10 March. Presale for G6 will take place from the 2-9 March. Samsung is going to introduce the Galaxy S8 in New York on the 29 March and launch it on 21 April. Presale for Galaxy S8 has not been figured out yet.

LG gets 42 days march on Samsung and this is the first time when LG has beaten Samsung to the punch. It will be about 50 days earlier if  the presale schedule is included. However, they are more or less releasing at the same time, which means that a war is expected in a way not seen before.

Initially Samsung was going to launch the Galaxy S8 globally on the 21 April and domestically a week earlier. Its original plan was to have presale on the week of the 6th April and launch the Galaxy S8 in South Korea on the 14 April. To have stable supplies, it has modified its plan by having Galaxy S8 launch globally and domestically on the same day.

So it looks like both companies are competing against each other before they officially launch their premium smartphones.

Courtesy-Fud

Samsung Still Facing Challenges Recovering Galaxy Note 7 Phones

December 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

galaxy-note-7-recall-150x150Samsung’s recall of Galaxy Note7 smartphones because of exploding batteries remains a challenging task, and some users, for example, in Canada, are still not exchanging their devices for a refund or a different phone.

The South Korean company has decided to cut these phones from the network, adopting similar measures to those taken last month in New Zealand and earlier this month in Australia.

The company said Wednesday that starting Dec. 12, functional limitations on Note7 phones, including curbs on the battery charge, and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth disablement will be introduced in Canada.

From Dec. 15, customers still using the Note7 will no longer be able to connect to any Canadian mobile network service to make calls, use data or send text messages. Samsung said it had been able to secure nearly 90 percent of the Note7 devices that were brought into the Canadian market.

When Samsung announced in September a recall of the Note7 in tandem with Health Canada, a Canadian federal government department, it was said that about 22,000 of the recalled smartphones were sold in the country.

Samsung announced a global recall of the Note7 in early September after it found a “battery cell issue.” The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission on Sept. 15 announced a recall in the U.S. of about 1 million Note7 phones as it found that the lithium-ion batteries in the devices could overheat and catch fire. By Oct. 13, the CPSC expanded the recall to include replacement Note7 phones that Samsung had supplied to customers under the first recall as they too were found to have the battery problem.

The company also stopped production of the phones. It has yet to explain in detail what caused the batteries to explode. A recent report suggested that the phone design could compress the battery even during normal operation.

Samsung said on Dec. 1 that it was working with local carriers to disconnect from Dec. 15 Note7 phones that were still being used by customers in Australia. Note7 owners in the country responded well to the recall, but a small number of affected devices are still with them, the company said. Customers in New Zealand were to be disconnected from Nov. 18.

The Note7 recall has been both a public relations and financial debacle for Samsung. The company has reported that the third quarter revenue of its IT and Mobile Communications division was down 15 percent from the same period last year to 22.5 trillion Korean won (US$19.8 billion) while operating profit fell 95 percent to 100 billion won, as a result of the discontinuation of the Galaxy Note7.

Will Apple Benefit By Leaps And Bounds Off The Note 7 Disaster?

October 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0note7Samsung is going to lose a few customers over its Note 7 fiasco, but not as many as the Apple fanboys have speculated.

The Tame Apple Press has been claiming that almost all the Galaxy Note 7 customers would defect to Apple’s iPhone 7, but a new survey suggests that less than 12 percent  of them are thinking like this, and that number is shrinking by the day.

Branding Brand conducted a second survey of 1,000 Samsung smartphone owners from October 11-12 to compare consumer confidence to its earlier study, conducted on September 23.

It seems that only 40 percent of Note7 users have had enough of Samsung and want to go somewhere else. Given what has happened, this is a rather small figure and of that 40 percent, less than a third are moving to something Applish. This figure is down from an earlier survey which was conducted after the first recall.

As expected most Samsung users  will go with another Android phone (up to 62 percent from 57 percent) and eight percent thought they would buy a Google Pixel. Given that is not really out yet we are not even sure why this option was in the survey. The Pixel is another Android device that means that Apple is going to get only 12 percent of the total Samsung users. More than 88 per cent of Note 7 users will either stay wilt Samsung or Android.

Chris Mason, co-founder and CEO of Branding Brand said:

“As we’ve watched the Galaxy Note7 recall and discontinuation play out, even more people say they will switch their smartphone brand. Consumers want to be confident in their personal safety and will choose a new smartphone accordingly. Only a week after Google’s smartphone launch, many already have their sights set on the Pixel.”

Courtesy-Fud

Samsung Offers Financial Incentive For Return Of Galaxy Note 7 Phones

October 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

galaxy-note-7-recall-150x150Samsung Electronics has begun offering financial incentives for U.S. and South Korea customers who turn in their Note 7s for other products or refund them, as the tech giant scrambles to shore up its reputation in the wake of a damaging safety crisis.

The consumer electronics company is also expanding a U.S. recall of the fire-prone model to a total 1.9 million Note 7 phones, which includes the 1 million Galaxy Note 7s it recalled on Sept. 15.

The South Korean giant is in damage-control mode as rivals like Apple Inc and LG Electronics try to steal market share from the global smartphone leader after it was forced to scrap its latest high-end device.

Samsung is boosting its marketing and promotional efforts around other Galaxy-series smartphones to cushion the blow from the demise of the premium Note 7, which it finally abandoned this week after failing to resolve overheating problems which caused some of the phones to ignite.

Samsung said on Thursday it is offering up to $100 in bill credit to consumers who exchange their Note 7s for any Samsung smartphone in the U.S.

U.S. customers who exchange their Note 7s for a refund or other branded smartphone will receive $25 in bill credit.

“We appreciate the patience of our consumers, carriers and retail partners for carrying the burden during these challenging times,” said Tim Baxter, president and chief operating officer, Samsung Electronics America.

“We are committed to doing everything we can to make this right.”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Thursday the Note 7’s “battery can overheat and catch fire, posing serious fire and burn hazard to consumers.”

It added that Samsung has received 96 reports of batteries in Note 7 phones overheating in the U.S., including 23 new reports since the Sept. 15 recall announcement.

In the U.S., Samsung began sending fireproof boxes and protective gloves to customers returning potentially explosive Note 7s, drawing humorous barbs from social media commentators.

The company has commenced offering similar financial incentives in its home market of South Korea, which it says would compensate consumers for their “big inconvenience.”

After days of heavy losses, Samsung’s shares ended 1.4 percent higher on Thursday while the broader market fell 0.9 percent.

On Wednesday, the firm slashed its quarterly profit estimate by $2.3 billion to reflect the impact of the Note 7 withdrawal, giving some investors hope that the financial cost of the debacle had been largely accounted for.

“We are confident the 3Q 16 re-statement puts to bed the direct financial impact of the Note 7 recall and termination,” UBS said in a report.

“In the near-term, we believe investors will re-focus on shareholders returns ahead of full 3Q results Oct 27th.”

Mobile Carriers Abandoning Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7

October 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

galaxy-note-7-recall-150x150AT&T and T-Mobile have began halting exchanges of Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphones that were shipped to solve an issue of overheating batteries in the previous version, following reports that the new phones have also been involved in incidents of overheating and explosions.

 Samsung has said it is investigating the issue and will share findings as soon as possible. The South Korean company has temporarily halted production of the Note7 smartphones in the wake of the new crisis, according to reports. Samsung did not immediately comment.

“Based on recent reports, we’re no longer exchanging new Note7s at this time, pending further investigation of these reported incidents,” AT&T spokesman Fletcher Cook wrote in an emailed statement Sunday.

“We still encourage customers with a recalled Note7 to visit an AT&T location to exchange that device for another Samsung smartphone or other smartphone of their choice,” he added.

T-Mobile also said Sunday it is temporarily suspending all sales of the new Note7 and exchanges for replacement Note7 devices. “Customers can still bring their recalled Note7 or the new replacement Note7, along with accessories they purchased from T-Mobile, to a T-Mobile store for a full refund and choose from any device in T-Mobile’s inventory,” the mobile operator said in a statement on Sunday.

Under an official program announced last month by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), about 1 million Note7 smartphones sold in the U.S. by Samsung before Sept. 15 were recalled following concerns about faulty lithium-ion batteries in the devices, which could overheat and even explode.

As part of the agreement with CPSC, customers could return the phones to Samsung for a refund, or exchange it for a new Note7 device, in which the battery issues had been resolved. The company also announced an exchange of the Note7 with Samsung’s Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 edge devices, and replacement of any Note7 specific accessories, with a refund of the price difference between devices.

The number of reports of replacement Note7 devices that have overheated or exploded has gone up to seven, and included a Note7 that caught fire on a Southwest Airlines flight, Ars Technica reported Sunday.

Is A 200,000 Core PC In The Making?

August 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

Future Processor

Future Processor

Princeton University researchers have developed a 25-core open source processor that can be scaled to create a monster 200,000-core PC stuffed with 8,000 64-bit chips. The chip is called Piton after the metal spikes driven by rock climbers into mountain sides, and was presented at the Hot Chips symposium on high-performance computing in Cupertino this week.

“With Piton, we really sat down and rethought computer architecture to build a chip specifically for data centres and the cloud,” said David Wentzlaff, a Princeton assistant professor of electrical engineering and associated faculty in the Department of Computer Science.

“The chip we’ve made is among the largest ever built in academia and it shows how servers could run far more efficiently and cheaply.”

The current version of the Piton chip measures 6mmx6mm. It has more than 460 million transistors, each as small as 32nm, the bulk of which are contained in 25 cores.

Companies and academic institutions have produced chips with many dozens of cores in recent years, but the readily scalable architecture of Piton can enable thousands of cores on a single chip with half a billion cores in the data centre, said Wentzlaff, adding that more cores ought to mean more processing power.

“What we have with Piton is really a prototype for future commercial server systems that could take advantage of a tremendous number of cores to speed up processing,” he said.

At the same time, he suggested, the design could also cut power consumption and therefore heat dissipation.

The programs being run in a typical data centre used by hundreds of thousands or even millions of users rely on similar operations at the microprocessor level. The Piton chip’s cores can recognise these instances and execute identical instructions consecutively so that they flow one after another.

This can increase energy efficiency by about 20 per cent compared with a standard core, according to the researchers.

A second innovation is called a memory-traffic shaper that mediates between the demands of different applications accessing memory on the chip. The researchers claimed that this can yield an 18 per cent improvement in performance compared with conventional means of memory allocation.

Piton also assigns areas of the on-chip cache memory to specific cores, while the cores themselves can be reserved or assigned to particular applications.

Generously, rather than creating a startup to exploit the various innovations, Wentzlaff confirmed that the designs will be published under an open source licence.

“We’re very pleased with all that we’ve achieved with Piton in an academic setting, where there are far fewer resources than at large commercial chipmakers. We’re also happy to give out our design to the world as open source, which has long been commonplace for software, but is almost never done for hardware,” he said.

The architecture has been designed to be easily scalable, enabling it to handle the large-scale repetitive processing tasks increasingly demanded of servers running in cloud data centres.

Courtesy-TheInq

Is Samsung Readying A 10nm SoC

August 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

Of course, it is that time of the year. Apple, Qualcomm, MediaTek and now Samsung will have 10nm SoCs ready for  phones in early 2017. Of course Samsung wants to use its own 10nm SoC in the Galaxy S8 that is expected in late February 2017, but probably with a mix of 10nm Snapdragon too.

Samsung’s next generation Exynos’ name is very uninspired. You don’t call your much better chip just the Exynos 8895, but that might not be the final name.

The Korean giant went from Exynos 7420 for Galaxy S5 and first 14nm for Android followed a year after with Exynos 8890 still 14nm but witha  custom Exynos M1 “Mongoose” plus Cortex-A53eight core combination.

The new SoC is rumored to come with a 4GHz clock. The same leak suggests that the Snapdragon 830 can reach 3.6 GHz which would be quite an increase from the 2.15Ghz that the company gets with the Snapdragon 820. Samsung’s Exynos 8890 stops at 2.6GHz with one or two cores running while it drops to 2.3 GHz when three of four cores from the main cluster run. Calls us sceptics for this 4GHz number as it sounds like quite a leap from the previous generation.

Let us remind ourselves that the clock speed is quite irrelevant as it doesn’t mean anything, and is almost as irrelevant as an Antutu score. It tells you the maximal clock of a SoC but you really want to know the performance per watt or how much TFlops you can expect in the best case. A clock speed without knowing the architecture is insufficient to make any analysis. We’ve seen in the past that 4GHz processors were slower than 2.5GHz processors.

The fact that Samsung continued to use Snapdragon 820 for its latest greatest Galaxy Note 7 means that the company still needs Qualcomm and we don’t think this is going to change anytime soon. Qualcomm traditionally has a better quality modem tailored well for USA, China, Japan and even the complex Europe or the rest of the world.

Courtesy-Fud

 

Is Arm Really A Good Fit For Softbank?

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

Softbank, the naysayers were mostly on ARM’s side. But it seems that Softbank is having trouble selling the idea to its own shareholders.

Shares in Japan’s Softbank have fallen 10 per cent after it agreed a controversial $30 billion deal to buy UK chip designer ARM.

Part of the reason that shareholders greeted the idea with horror was that it would dump a pile of debt on the company, but the other reason was the value of the company was expected to plummet after Brexit causes the UK economy to collapse.

It was for this reason that the UK Chancellor Philip Hammond welcomed the deal saying that despite the vote to leave the EU, Britain “has lost none of its allure to international investors”. Of course sending profits overseas is just the sort of thing that is good for the British economy under Hammond’s new glorious economic plan.

Common sense, as expressed by ARM co-founder Hermann Hauser, said it represented a “sad day” for the UK’s technology sector. ARM was a golden child which emerged from the days when the UK used to actually make computers.

Analysts had been hoping that Softbank, which has raised nearly 19 billion in cash through sales of some of its assets, was going to use some of that cash to reduce its debt or reward shareholders.

Instead it has secured a $10 billion bridge loan to finance part of its ARM purchase.

SoftBank has pledged to preserve ARM’s existing management team, maintain its headquarters in Cambridge, at least double the number of employees in the UK over the next five years and increase its overseas workforce.

Courtesy-Fud

 

ARM Shows Off 10nm Chip

May 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

ARM’s collaboration with TSMC has finally born some fruit with the tapeout of a 10nm test chip to show off the company’s readiness for the new manufacturing process.

The new test chip contains ARM’s yet-to-be-announced “Artemis” CPU core which is named after a goddess who will turn you into deer and tear you apart with wild dogs if you ever see her. [The NDA must have been pretty tough on this chip.ed]

In fact things have been ticking along on this project for ages. ARM discloses that tapeout actually took place back in December last year and is expecting silicon to come back from the foundry in the following weeks.

ARM actually implemented a full four-core Artemis cluster on the test chip which should show vendors what is possible for their production designs. The test chip has a current generation Mali GPU implementation with 1 shader core to show vendors what they will get when they use ARM’s POP IP in conjunction with its GPU IP. There is also a range of other IP blocks and I/O interfaces that are used to validation of the new manufacturing process.

TSMC’s 10FF manufacturing process is supposed to increase density with scaling’s of up to 2.1x compared to the previous 16nm manufacturing node. It also brings about 11-12 per cent higher performance at each process’ respective nominal voltage, or a 30 per cent reduction in power.

ARM siad that comparing a current Cortex A72 design on 16FF+ and an Artemis core on 10FF on the new CPU and process can halve the dynamic power consumption. Currently clock frequencies on the new design are still behind the older more mature process and IP, but ARM expects this to improve as it optimizes its POP and the process stabilizes.

Courtesy-Fud

 

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