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Samsung Finally Launches Bixby Voice App For Galaxy S8

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Samsung has finally officially launched voice capabilities for its Bixby smart sidekick in the US, about three months after the artificial intelligence technology first became available on its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus phones. The company had delayed the launch and missed its own promised “later this spring” deadline, at least in the US.

Owners of its newest phones will be able to access Bixby Voice after downloading a software update, rolling out at 9 p.m. PT. South Korean users, who’ve had access to Bixby Voice in the Korean language since May 1, will also be able to now access the English language capabilities. The company didn’t say when Bixby Voice will be available in other countries.

Bixby is Samsung’s new digital voice assistant that debuted on its latest smartphones. It has its own dedicated button on the side of the device, letting you communicate with the artificial intelligence like you’d use a walkie-talkie. The only problem is the voice part of the assistantdidn’t actually work when the Galaxy S8 hit the market in April. What did work with Bixby was its “Vision, Home and Reminder” functions that identify objects in photos, help you track your day and remind you about upcoming events on your calendar.

Rather than launching voice capabilities right away, Samsung said it needed more time to get Bixby ready for mainstream consumers. It has been testing it out with over 100,000 Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus users in its early access preview program. Those participants generated more than 4 million commands and helped Samsung refine Bixby’s capabilities.

One benefit includes “increased comprehension on command variations.” You can, for instance, ask what the weather is like by saying “Show me today’s weather,” “What’s the weather like today?” or “What’s the forecast today?” Samsung says it has improved Bixby’s response times, increased hands-free operations and included a new “read aloud feature.” You can ask it to read the latest email you’ve received.

Samsung also has worked to make Bixby interact better with third-party apps. If you’re using Google Maps, you can use Bixby to change the location of your origin or destination.

Bixby is the latest entrant in the crowded field of digital assistants that already includes Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Google Assistant and Microsoft’s Cortana. Every tech heavyweight is investing in these assistants because they’re heralded as the future of how we’ll interact with our gadgets. The hope is to build a relationship with you now and ultimately get you to buy more of their products later.

Google’s Mobile App Gets New Look, Feel

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Google has announced a re-tooling of its search app on mobile phones to include a personalized feed of links about hobbies, travel, sports and other topics, a move that puts the search company into more direct competition with social networks such as Facebook.

Google, the world’s largest search engine and a unit of Alphabet Inc, said the changes would begin rolling out in the United States on Wednesday and other countries in the coming weeks.

The new offering is called “Google Feed,” a name that may conjure comparisons to Facebook’s “News Feed,” a feature on Facebook used to browse updates from friends, family and other sources.

Google said, however, that it was not trying to duplicate Facebook Inc, the world’s largest social network. Instead, the company said it wanted to create another place to see a stream of relevant search results.

“This feed is really about your interests … It’s not really about what your friends are interested in,” Ben Gomes, a Google vice president for engineering, said in a briefing with reporters.

Typical updates might include a link to a website with tips about an upcoming vacation spot, or a link to a page about cycling or another hobby, the company said.

Facebook and Google are jockeying for attention online and by extension, for advertising revenue based on those eyeballs. The two Silicon Valley companies are expected to take in some 50 percent of overall online ad spending in 2018, according to research firm eMarketer.

There were no immediate plans to include advertising in Google Feed, Gomes said.

Google Feed will suggest links based on a user’s Google search history as well as data from other Google services, such as YouTube, Gmail and Google Calendar, the company said.

In addition to putting Google Feed on mobile apps, the company is looking at attaching it to web browsers in some form, Shashi Thakur, a second Google vice president for engineering, said during the briefing.

Will WhatsApp Face Competition From Amazon

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Just when you thought the messaging app market couldn’t get any more crowded, along come the rumors that Amazon wants a piece of the action.

According to AFTV News, Amazon has begun surveying customers about the new messaging service to gauge which features are most important them.

Called Anytime, the rumored app will apparently be a one-stop-shop focused on voice and video calls, alongside a photo sharing feature with @mentions, as well as some highly-original real-time filters for photos and video with “special effects and masks.”

So yes, that will almost definitely mean more basic dog-eared AR seflies *eyeroll emoji*.

If the rumors are true, the service would also keep chats private and allows users to “encrypt important messages like bank account details”, allowing them to converse with businesses, make reservations, and – in true Amazon style – virtually shop until they drop.

“Based on the images I’ve been provided, Anytime by Amazon seems to be an all-in-one feature rich service that could even rival social networks,” the AFTV report stated. “[It] will also provide tasks that can be done in groups, like playing games, listening to music, and ordering food.”

There’s no word on how long the app will take to get into the phone-wielding hands of the masses, but a customer said the survey implied it was “a ready product”.

Are you surprised that Amazon is making a move on the messaging app market? We’re certainly not. The firm is desperate to get in on any kind of action these days in its plan to take over the world and be the go-to for everything.

Don’t be shocked when the company launches its own dating service, where we would expect you could get a dinner date with Alexa as part of a Black Friday deal.

Courtesy-GI.biz

Pricing For AMD’s Ryzen 1300X Leaked

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

According to a Reddit post, upcoming Ryzen 3 SKUs, the Ryzen 3 1300X and the Ryzen 3 1200, will be hitting the market at US $129 and US $109 (exc. VAT), respectively.

While AMD has revealed a lot of details regarding its two upcoming quad-core Ryzen 3 SKUs yesterday, including the clocks and the launch date, we are still missing a couple of key details, including the TDP, amount of cache and the price.

In case you missed it yesterday, both Ryzen 3 SKUs are quad-core parts without SMT (Simultaneous Multi Threading) support, so they will stick to “just” four threads. The Ryzen 1300X works at 3.5GHz base and 3.7GHz Turbo clocks, while the Ryzen 3 1200 works at 3.1GHz base and 3.5GHz Turbo clocks. As rumored earlier, the Ryzen 3 lineup should retain the 2MB/8MB cache (L2/L3) as the Ryzen 5 series and should have the same 65W TDP, although these details are left to be confirmed.

Luckily, a Reddit user has managed to get unconfirmed details regarding the price of these two SKUs, suggesting that they should launch at US $129 for the Ryzen 3 1300X and US $109 for the Ryzen 3 1200, excluding VAT. While the price of the Ryzen 3 1300X sounds about right, and similar to what we heard before, we have our doubts regarding the Ryzen 3 1200 price, which we suspect would be closer to the US $100 mark.

In any case, we’ll know for sure in about two weeks when these parts are scheduled to hit retail/e-tail shelves. It will be quite interesting to see these Ryzen 3 SKUs compared to some Intel Core i3 Kaby Lake dual-core parts as we are quite sure that these will give Intel a hard time in that part of the market, offering significantly higher performance for much less money.

Courtesy-Fud

Is Virtual Reality To Expensive For The Masses

July 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Gaming

The current generation of virtual reality is not dead, but it’s not exactly full of life, either. What once was a pulsating buzz has faded into the background of an industry, not because there are newer, shinier toys to play with, but simply because for all the newness and shine of VR, there has been little evidence that a significant audience exists for the experiences we can deliver at this time.

Earlier this week, Oculus instituted a temporary $200 price cut of the Rift, dropping the headset and its Touch controllers to a $400 bundle that comes packed with seven free games (including Lucky’s Tale, Medium, Toybox, and Robo Recall) and an Xbox One controller for good measure. That’s in addition to the $200 price cut Oculus rolled out in March for the headset and Touch combo, meaning the company has slashed the price by 50% in just four months.

On its own, this could actually be an encouraging sign, but taken in context of the rest of the news coming out of the VR sector, it’s more concerning than convincing. For one, Oculus looks to be bringing up the rear among the three major high-end VR options on the market, despite being a first mover and having the significant financial backing of Facebook. Through the first half of this year, tracking firm Superdata put the Rift’s installed base at just 383,000 units, compared to HTC Vive’s 667,000 units and PlayStation VR’s 1.8 million.

Even ignoring its relative sales position, Oculus is already in a tough spot in the enthusiast VR fight, technologically a step behind the more expensive Vive, but still more expensive (when considering the cost of a VR-capable PC) and less mass market than the PSVR. That’s a difficult problem for marketing anything, doubly so when what you’re selling is an experience that by its nature needs to be experienced to be fully understood, triply so when you’re drastically scaling back the number of demo units in retail locations where interested customers could get their first taste of VR.

I also question Oculus’ decision to shutter its in-house Story Studio, which was set up with Pixar veterans to show how VR could shift the medium of film as much as it could games. The studio’s Henry won an Emmy in 2016. Its follow-up, Dear Angelica, premiered at Sundance earlier this year to rave reviews and has been submitted for Emmy consideration at this year’s awards, which are still a few months away. In short, Story Studio was exactly the sort of investment in a potentially disruptive medium you would expect a company with long-term ambitions to keep. Instead, they cut it loose, with head of content Jason Rubin essentially saying it was time for external filmmakers to pick up the narrative VR ball (albeit with some $50 million in funding from Oculus).

There’s a bit of a theme there. Just a couple months before closing Story Studio, Rubin pointed out for GamesIndustry.biz at GDC that Facebook–and by extension, Oculus–isn’t a content creation company.

“Facebook’s not a media company,” Rubin said. “So there may be a day where Facebook says we’re going to head towards our core competency… That’s why I don’t have internal teams. I have exactly one group of three people besides Story Studios because that didn’t exist outside.”

Facebook didn’t pay $2 billion for Oculus in 2014 because it wanted to make games. It wanted VR to be a popular thing it could leverage for its social network. If HTC Vive or Sony or Microsoft can make VR work better than Oculus, that still gets VR where the social network wants it to be. That’s not ideal for Facebook, but after the Rift’s slow start, the hundreds of millions it already owes in court judgments, the hundreds of millions more it might be made to pay in the future, and seeing the face of the VR revolution leave under a cloud of controversy, one could understand if the company’s commitment to VR began to waver.

Speaking of the competition, I’m not terribly optimistic with what they’re bringing to the table. Sony’s PSVR is leading the pack, but I’m still skeptical whether the company’s interest in the hardware will be any longer lasting than its support for Vita, or Wonderbook, or PlayStation TV, or Move, or EyeToy, or stereoscopic 3D. Sony’s E3 conference featured some promising games in Polyarc’s Moss, two titles from Until Dawn developer Supermassive, and Skyrim VR, but little that stands out as a system-seller the way that Resident Evil 7, or even the prospect of last year’s Batman and Star Wars VR experiences might have. When asked at E3 about whether that lineup would boost PSVR adoption, Sony’s Jim Ryan was unsure.

“I think we are still really just learning about VR,” Ryan said. “When hopefully we meet in a year’s time, I will be able to give you a better answer to this question. It still won’t be a perfect answer, but I’ll know more.”

That’s not exactly an overwhelming vote of confidence from PlayStation’s chief marketer. I’m not sure I want to bet the future health of VR on Sony’s continued support for a market that is (for now, at least) peripheral to its core business.

The situation with HTC and the Vive underscores another issue when trying to establish an emerging field like VR. Vive launched at the cutting edge, but since then has rolled out object tracker peripherals and a wireless adaptor, respectively giving developers more options and addressing a key complaint around high-end VR. In both cases, they would be better served as being part of the core hardware package rather than optional add-ons for what is already the most expensive option on the market. For the next generation of VR, perhaps they’ll be standard.

But who will invest in the next generation of enthusiast VR–on either the consumer side or the manufacturer side–if this generation disappoints? How long does a VR generation need to be before someone who spent $800 on a Vive (not to mention the cost of a VR-capable PC) feels they got their money’s worth and would re-up for a successor? How many great games does it need to have? How many generations does an HTC or Facebook need to take a bath on before the business turns around and justifies the continued investment?

Then there’s Microsoft, which will enter the fray this holiday season with its “mixed reality” VR headsets for Windows that are cheaper and require less of a set up than Oculus or Vive, but appear to make compromises on the technical side to get there. It’s telling that even with Microsoft launching the high-end, VR-capable Xbox One X this year, it is foregoing any sort of console VR push and relying on higher resolutions and better frame rates for Xbox One games as the sales pitch for a One X. Phil Spencer told us at E3 that VR was still years away from the mainstream for gamers, suggesting the company was waiting to launch its console VR until it had a proper wireless solution ready.

At this point, it seems more likely to me that the current enthusiast VR market is an expensive R&D exercise that won’t produce successful systems, but will lay the groundwork for the actual mass market VR, which will instead evolve both in audience and use-cases from the mobile VR world. (We call it mobile VR, but I don’t think I’m alone in having never once seen someone using a mobile VR headset on the subway, in the security line at the airport, or in the waiting room at a dentist.)

A number of the VR developers I’ve spoken to have mentioned wires, price, system-selling software, and installed base as key issues VR needs to tackle to become truly mainstream. As Google Daydream and the Oculus-powered Gear VR have shown, the first two are all but solved problems in mobile VR thanks to the use of existing smartphones. As for the other two, when your system is only $100 or so, the definition of a system-seller changes dramatically, which then has plenty of beneficial implications for the installed base. (Promotions like Samsung giving away Gear VR with new Galaxy phone purchases don’t hurt, either.)

All mobile VR really needs are better interfaces and more powerful phones. The Gear VR motion controller is a good first step for the former, and the latter is improving all the time. If VR is really going to go mass market, doesn’t it make more sense for it to grow not from the high-end early adopter market who would have dropped $600 on a PS3, but from the masses who made a compelling novelty like the $250 Wii a phenomenon?

Courtesy-GI.biz

Is Intel Worried About AMD’s Epyc Processor

July 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Intel is clearly feeling a little insecure about AMD’s new Epyc Server processor range based on the RyZen technology.

Intel’s press office retreated to the company safe and pulled out its favorite pink handbag and emerged swinging.

It did a direct comparison between the two, and in one slide, it mentioned that the Epyc processor was ‘inconsistent’, and called it ‘glued together’.

Intel noted that it required a lot of optimisations to get it to work effectively, comparing it to the rocky start AMD had with Ryzen on the desktop. That is pretty much fighting talk, and it has gone down rather badly.

TechPowerUp noted that even though Epyc did contain four dies, it offered some advantages as well, like better yields. On top of that, they noted: “So AMD’s server platform will require optimisations as well because Ryzen did, for incomparably different workloads? History does inform the future, but not to the extent that Intel is putting it here to, certainly. Putting things in the same perspective, is Intel saying that their Xeon ecosystem sees gaming-specific optimizations?”

Intel still has a healthy lead on AMD in the server space. However, since the launch of Ryzen, Intel has seen a significant drop in support in the desktop market.

Trash talking is usually a sign that there is not much difference between products and it never really works – other than to amuse.

AMD announced its line of Epyc processors last month. The range consists of chips between eight and 32 cores, all of which support eight channels of DDR4-2666 memory. Pricing was announced to start from $400.

Courtesy-Fud

Lloyd’s Of London Sounds The Alarm On Impacts Of Cyber Attacks

July 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A major, global cyber attack could lead to an average of $53 billion of economic losses, a figure on par with a catastrophic natural disaster such as U.S. Superstorm Sandy in 2012, Lloyd’s of London said in a report on Monday.

The report, co-written with risk-modeling firm Cyence, examined potential economic losses from the hypothetical hacking of a cloud service provider and cyber attacks on computer operating systems run by businesses worldwide.

Insurers are struggling to estimate their potential exposure to cyber-related losses amid mounting cyber risks and interest in cyber insurance. A lack of historical data on which insurers can base assumptions is a key challenge.

“Because cyber is virtual, it is such a difficult task to understand how it will accumulate in a big event,” Lloyd’s of London Chief Executive Inga Beale told Reuters.

Economic costs in the hypothetical cloud provider attack dwarf the $8 billion global cost of the “WannaCry” ransomware attack in May, which spread to more than 100 countries, according to Cyence.

Economic costs typically include business interruptions and computer repairs.

The Lloyd’s report follows a U.S. government warning to industrial firms about a hacking campaign targeting the nuclear and energy sectors.

In June, an attack of a virus dubbed “NotPetya” spread from infections in Ukraine to businesses around the globe. It encrypted data on infected machines, rendering them inoperable and disrupted activity at ports, law firms and factories.

“NotPetya” caused $850 million in economic costs, Cyence said.

In the hypothetical cloud service attack in the Lloyd’s-Cyence scenario, hackers inserted malicious code into a cloud provider’s software that was designed to trigger system crashes among users a year later.

By then, the malware would have spread among the provider’s customers, from financial services companies to hotels, causing all to lose income and incur other expenses.

Average economic losses caused by such a disruption could range from $4.6 billion to $53 billion for large to extreme events. But actual losses could be as high as $121 billion, the report said.

As much as $45 billion of that sum may not be covered by cyber policies due to companies underinsuring, the report said.

Average losses for a scenario involving a hacking of operating systems ranged from $9.7 billion to $28.7 billion.

Lloyd’s has a 20 percent to 25 percent share of the $2.5 billion cyber insurance market, Beale said in June.

Apple Pay Tempts Chinese Consumers With Huge Discounts

July 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

China’s mobile payments market is worth almost $6 trillion, and Apple wants to elbow its way in.

To entice more Chinese to start using Apple Pay, the iPhone maker is offering up to 50 percent discounts off purchases at participating vendors, many of them Western brands. It’s also rewarding users up to 50 times the usual points for designated credit cards, according to Apple’s official Chinese website. The promotion period will run from July 18 to 24.

China is a tough market to break into for Apple Pay, because the Chinese are more familiar with local mobile payment services such as WeChat Pay and Alipay. The two services have a combined market share of 92 percent, and people are so dependent on them that the companies have expanded overseas specifically to cater to Chinese travelers.

Promotions are offered by Apple Pay, but they are subject to varying terms and conditions set out by merchants. While Burger King and Costa Coffee have capped 50 percent discounts at 15 yuan (or $2.22), for example, 7-Eleven set its cap at 10 yuan (approximately $1.48). Starbucks, on the other hand, will take 15 yuan off purchases amounting to 60 yuan (or $8.86) or more.

A Re-organized AT&T To Run Wireless, Media Properties Separately

July 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

AT&T Inc plans to operate its wireless and DirecTV satellite television businesses separately from Time Warner Inc’s media assets following its $85.4 billion acquisition of the entertainment group.

Buying Time Warner gives AT&T control of cable TV channels HBO and CNN, film studio Warner Bros and other coveted media assets. AT&T’s post-merger plans were earlier reported by Bloomberg News.

The deal, announced in October, is seen as a bold move by the telecommunications giant to acquire content to stream over its network. AT&T hopes the programming will give it a competitive edge in a saturated wireless market. The deal also brings a wealth of user data for more targeted advertising.

The reorganization will leave AT&T executives in charge of the combined company. John Stankey, who currently leads DirecTV and other entertainment businesses, will head up the media division and John Donovan, AT&T’s chief strategy officer who oversees technology and operations, will run the wireless business, the source said.

AT&T Chief Executive Officer Randall Stephenson will remain chairman and CEO of the combined company after the deal closes, an AT&T spokesman said.

In an emailed statement, AT&T spokesman Fletcher Cook said no decisions on an organizational structure have been finalized and that Stephenson and Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes were still working on them. Time Warner did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Bob Quinn, AT&T senior executive vice president of external and legislative affairs, told reporters this week that the company expects to close the merger by the end of the year. “We are just working through the process,” Quinn said, noting it also needs approvals from some international agencies and the

Only 3 Out Of The Top 500 Online Merchants Accept Bitcoins

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

 

If you’ve somehow amassed cache of bitcoins and want to do some online shopping, the bad news is you probably won’t be buying much.

This year, the cryptocurrency is only accepted by three out of the top 500 online merchants, reports Bloomberg. That’s down from five from last year, making using Bitcoin to buy things from merchants a lot tougher.

The lack of merchants is puzzling, given the gains from bitcoins recently — one bitcoin is worth more than an ounce of gold — and may be a sign that the cryptocurrency is better off as an asset than currency.

The Bloomberg report also mentioned that transaction fees could be an issue why the crytocurrency is not widely accepted. With fees climbing, smaller transactions aren’t worth it compared to using other payment methods.

 

iPhone 8 May Come With Scaled Down Features

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

The upcoming iPhone 8 may not debut with a complete set of features that Apple has planned. Problems with the iPhone’s rumored wireless charging and facial recognition software could cause Apple to disable these features when the phone arrives in stores, according to Fast Company.

June was allegedly a tough month for Apple’s iPhone team, according to the report. With Apple’s usual iPhone reveal likely falling sometime in September, the team is reportedly ironing out the wrinkles in time for the phone’s launch. One of Fast Company’s sources reported “a sense of panic in the air.”

The iPhone 8 (which is what we’re calling the phone for now) is said to receive a major redesign that will debut features never before seen on an iPhone. Apple’s inability to ready these features for launch could lead to impatience if buyers experience a serious delay. Samsung’s slow release of the Bixby Voice app on the Galaxy S8 is a clear example.

This wouldn’t be the first time that Apple delayed a feature release, either. Last year’s iPhone 7 Plus‘s Portrait Mode wasn’t enabled until after the phone went on sale. Fast Company reported that if Apple can’t get its new technology working smoothly in time, it may similarly ship the iPhone 8 with the right hardware built-in and activate it later on when the software is ready.

There have been persistent rumors that Apple might delay the iPhone 8 sale date due to issues with the fingerprint sensor.

 

Will The EU Fine Canon

July 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

EU regulators said they might fine Canon up to 10 percent of annual revenue for jumping the gun in its acquisition of Toshiba Medical unit.

The EU Commission said Canon breached rules by using a so-called “warehousing” two-step transaction structure involving an interim buyer to buy the company prior to obtaining relevant approvals.

Ten percent of Canon’s annual revenue would be roughly equivalent to $2.9 billion.

The $6 billion deal, completed late last year, raised eyebrows at the time due to the unorthodox method which allowed Toshiba, which was struggling for cash after an accounting scandal, to book proceeds in time for the financial year-end in March.

Rival bidder Fujifilm slammed the deal as a “mockery of the law”.

Canon said in a statement that it would respond appropriately, but declined further comment before regulators make their final decision.

Last month, EU antitrust regulators hit Google with a record 2.4-billion-euro fine for favouring its own shopping service so it is proving a lucrative month.

Courtesy-Fud

Is Intel Abandoning The IoT Arena

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

For ages Intel has been banging on about the Internet of Things and how it will be the saviour of the chip business.

It seemed that Intel, having been too late to take advantage of the mobile boom, wanted to be in place when the Internet of the Things arrived.

However, Intel of late, appears to be withdrawing some of its enthusiasm. It is discontinuing its Galileo, Joule, and Edison lineups of development boards. The chip maker quietly made the announcement and now appears to be letting 130 people go from its IoT teams.

Intel plans to lay off 97 people at its corporate headquarters in Santa Clara and up to 40 more in Ireland as the chipmaker makes cuts to its Internet of Things group.

Intel’s IoT group provided $721 million in revenue in the first quarter of the year, up nearly 11 percent from the prior year. But IoT accounted for less than five percent of Intel’s sales.

Curiously, Intel hasn’t yet scrapped Curie, its platform for wearable devices. But given that the wearable market is at a standstill, it might not be long before Intel exits this market segment too.

But it is looking like Intel is falling back to its default PC/Server chips and has no plan to do anything else.

Courtesy-Fud

TripAdvisor Teams Up With Deliveroo On Food Ordering Service

July 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

TripAdvisor Inc had decided to team up with Deliveroo to incorporate the delivery firm’s food ordering service into the travel site’s listings across 12 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, both companies said on Tuesday.

Consumers can use TripAdvisor smartphone or computer apps to order food from more than 20,000 restaurant partners of Deliveroo in some 140 cities from Britain to Germany to Italy, the United Arab Emirates and Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore.

U.S-based TripAdvisor combines listings for 7 million hotels, flights, attractions and restaurants with more than 500 million user reviews in 49 countries.

TripAdvisor had 390 million average monthly visitors across its network as of December, according to web audience measurement firm Comscore.

Deliveroo is a privately held London-based start-up which has raised $475 million in five venture capital rounds. It competes in the premium food delivery market with rivals such as Foodora, a unit of Berlin-based Delivery Hero.

Terms of the partnership were not disclosed.

 

Wrixo Offers Wristband With Info For Emergency Situations

July 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

There’s a new low-tech wristband that is capable of sharing your medical information when you unable to.

Unlike smart wearables with built in CPUs, antennas and displays, Wrixo is a simple waterproof wristband that can use a preprinted QR code or built-in NFC chip to access important patient health information — including medical history, prescriptions, and allergies — that you’ve previously stored in an online cloud.

Users can also upload other relevant information like their blood type, insurance and even past records like X-rays, MRIs or lab reports. According to Wrixo, the technology is HIPPA-compliant, although we still have some questions about privacy and security, which are especially sensitive topics for media information.

The product — starting at $19 — uses its QR code to allow doctors to access the information by scanning. Or, the embedded Near Field Communication wireless chip allows emergency responders with NFC-enabled phones to tap the wristband for information. Wrixo’s cloud-storage service for medical information and records comes in both free and premium ($6 per month) tiers.

A tag turns the device into a necklace or keychain. For people with service dogs, there’s a clip to attach it to the dog’s collar or vest.

The wristbands are now available for preorder on the Wrixo website, and Idol Memory has launched an Indiegogo campaign that will give a percentage of the wristband proceeds to Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.

Right now, there’s no telling how effectively these wristbands will perform under high-intensity emergency situations, but the company is confident the device will do its job successfully.

“It could truly be the difference between life and death,” said George Shih, founder of Wrixo, in a press release. “It is crucial that emergency and medical personnel have immediate access to patient records and information so they can administer the proper treatment in a matter of seconds.”

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