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Why Are Some ATMs Still Running Windows XP?

January 2, 2014 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

Cyber-criminals have been cutting holes into European cash machines in order to infect them with malware.

The holes were cut so that the hackers could plug in USB drives that installed their code onto the ATMs. Details of the attacks on an unnamed European bank’s cash dispensers were presented at the hacker-themed Chaos Computing Congress in Hamburg, Germany.

The thefts came to light in July after the lender involved noticed several its ATMs were being emptied. The bank discovered the criminals were vandalising the machines to use the infected USB sticks. Once the malware had been transferred, they patched the holes up. This allowed the same machines to be targeted several times without the hack being discovered.

The attackers could take the highest value banknotes in order to minimise the amount of time they were exposed. Interestingly the software required the thief to enter a second code in response to numbers shown on the ATM’s screen before they could release the money and the thief could only obtain the right code by phoning another gang member and telling them the numbers displayed. This stopped the criminals going alone.

Courtesy-Fud

 

ATM Malware Found In Mexico Has Potential To Spread Globally

October 29, 2013 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

A malicious software program identified in ATMs in Mexico has been improved and translated into English, which suggests it may be used elsewhere, according to security vendor Symantec.

Two versions of the malware, called Ploutus, have been discovered, both of which are engineered to empty a certain type of ATM, which Symantec has not identified.

In contrast to most malware, Ploutus is installed the old-fashioned way — by inserting a CD boot disk into the innards of an ATM machine running Microsoft Windows. The installation method suggests that cybercriminals are targeting standalone ATMs where access is easier.

The first version of Ploutus displays a graphical user interface after the thief enters a numerical sequence on an ATM’s keypad, although the malware can be controlled by a keyboard, wrote Daniel Regalado, a Symantec malware analyst, on Oct. 11.

Ploutus is programmed for a specific ATM model since it assumes there is a maximum of four cassettes per dispenser in the ATM. It then calculates the amount of money that should be dispensed based on the number of bills. If any of the cassettes have less than the maximum number of 40 bills, it releases whatever is left, repeating that process until the ATM is empty.

Kevin Haley, director of Symantec Security Response, said in an interview earlier this month that the attackers have deep knowledge of the software and hardware of the particular ATM model.

“They clearly know how this machine worked,” he said.

The source code of Ploutus “contains Spanish function names and poor English grammar that suggests the malware may have been coded by Spanish-speaking developers,” Regalado wrote.

In a new blog post, Regalado wrote that the attackers made Ploutus more robust and translated it into English, indicating the same ATM software can be exploited in countries other than Mexico.

The “B” variant of Ploutus has some differences. It only accepts commands through the keypad but will display a window showing the money available in the machine along with a transaction log as it dispenses cash. An attacker cannot enter a specific number of bills, so Ploutus withdraws money from the cassette with the most available bills, Regalado wrote.

Symantec advised those with ATMs to change the BIOS boot order to only boot from the hard disk and not CDs, DVDs or USB sticks. The BIOS should also be password protected so the boot options can’t be changed, Regalado wrote.

 

PayPal Unveils New In-Store Payment Product

September 16, 2011 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

PayPal has unveiled a mobile payment product for customers that doesn’t require near-field communication (NFC) technology inside smartphones.

The system relies instead on using smartphones and other mobile devices to scan product bar codes and to authorize payments through PayPal mobile accounts. Shoppers will also be able to use credit-card scanning terminals commonly seen in grocery stores: The user inputs a phone number and PIN on the terminal’s keypad instead of swiping a credit or debit card.

PayPal President Scott Thompson laid out the basics of the plan in a blog posted Wednesday. In the blog, he also took a swipe at competitors, including Google, MasterCard, Visa and others, who are working with NFC in smartphones for a mobile wallet.

“Let’s be clear about something — we’re not just shoving a credit card on a phone,” Thompson said in his blog.

PayPal is already a major global force in online payments, with 100 million customers. While PayPal’s new payment technologies don’t rely on NFC, they do propose making in-store payments possible from any device and support GPS-based offers, according to Thompson’s blog. PayPal will even allow for customers to set up payments on credit after they’ve checked out.

Dozens of merchants got a sneak peak of the technology Wednesday at an event PayPal sponsored. The event was covered by All Things D, which was not allowed to take photographs, but posted a story. In addition to the payment methods shown in the PayPal video, that story said PayPal will allow customers to continue using plastic cards, issued by PayPal, for payment.

In an interview posted on AllThingsD, Thompson said the PayPal approach doesn’t require merchants to install new terminals, nor does it require customers to buy a new smartphone.

While Thompson didn’t rule out NFC, he did say, “We are not embracing technology,” adding that working with NFC on a specific phone with a certain network and banks might only service “50 people out of 350 million people in the U.S.”

PayPal said in February it would start pilot programs of mobile payments within a year, but hasn’t given more details on timing. It faces a number of competitors.

Google Removes Malicious Code

March 7, 2011 by Michael  
Filed under Mobile

Over the weekend Android’s parent Google finally removed a bunch of malicious applications from the Android Market and will use the kill switch in Android to remove the code from users smartphones we heard.

 

Unfortunately, 260,000 smartphones users had already downloaded the application to their Android phones.Unfortunately with an OS version earlier than version 2.2.2 were vulnerable to the malicious applications.   There were Fifty-eight malicious applications that were discovered and removed.  smartphonePeople who are using an Android 

Google  made the statement that they had to use the built-in kill switch to remotely remove the apps from users’ devices and push an Android security update to affected users to fix the damage done by the malicious applications. The search engine giant said they will be sending out an email explaining what happened.

TWe heard that he developer accounts responsible for the malicious application were suspended.

The pirated versions of legitimate applications on the Android Market were infected by a Trojan called DroidDream, which uses a root exploit dubbed “rageagainstthecage”.

The malware captured user’s private and product information from the smartphone and had the ability to download more mailicious code.

Google Pulls Apps From Android Market

March 2, 2011 by Michael  
Filed under Mobile

Google has steps to rid the Android Market place of several applications that were found to be ridden with malware.

Apparently the openness of the Android platform appears to be the culprit, since the applications were not screened and not following Googles protocol policies. We hear that the applications were developed by several individuals and unfortunately contained the  DroidDream malware, which supposedly steals personal data.

 On a good note, Google is investigating the matter and will hoepfully take more action.  I wonder if the people at Apple and Microsoft are laughing at the openness of Android?  We know that unfortunately, this is only the beginning.

Link to Malware Apps.

Soundminer Malware Steals Android Phones User Data

January 20, 2011 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

Researchers have developed a low-profile Trojan horse program for Google’s Android mobile OS that lifts data in a way that will more than likely go undetected by either a user or antivirus software.

The malware, called Soundminer, monitors phone calls and records when a person, for example, says their credit card number or enters one on the phone’s keypad, according to the study.

Using various analysis techniques, Soundminer trims the extraneous recorded information down to the most essential, such as the credit card number itself, and sends just that small bit of information back to the attacker over the network, the researchers said.

The study was done by Roman Schlegel of City University of Hong Kong and Kehuan Zhang, Xiaoyong Zhou, Mehool Intwala, Apu Kapadia, XiaoFeng Wang of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.

“We implemented Soundminer on an Android phone and evaluated our technique using realistic phone conversation data,” they wrote. “Our study shows that an individual’s credit card number can be reliably identified and stealthily disclosed. Therefore, the threat of such an attack is real.”

Soundminer is deliberately developed to ask for as few permissions as possible to avoid suspicion. For example, Soundminer may be allowed access to the phone’s microphone, but further access to transmit data, intercept outgoing phone calls and access contact lists might look suspicious.

So in another version of the attack, the researchers paired Soundminer with a separate Trojan, called Deliverer, which is responsible for sending the information collected by Soundminer.

Since Android could prevent that communication between applications, the researchers investigated a stealthy way for Soundminer to communicate with Deliverer. They found what they term are several “covert channels,” where changes in a feature are communicated with other interested applications, such as vibration settings.

Soundminer could code its sensitive data in a form that looks like a vibration setting but is actually the sensitive data, where Deliverer could decode it and then further transmit the info out to a remote server. That covert vibration settings channel only has 87 bits of bandwidth, but that is enough to send a credit card number, which is just 54 bits, they wrote.

Soundminer was coded to do the voice and number recognition on the phone itself, which averts the need to send large chunks of data through the network for analysis, which might again trigger an alert from security software.

If it is installed on a device, users are likely to approve of the settings that Soundminer is allowed to use, such as the phone’s microphone. Since Soundminer doesn’t directly need network access due to its use of a covert side channel to send its information, it is unlikely to raise suspicion.

Two antivirus programs for Android, VirusGuard from SMobile Systems and Droid Security’s AntiVirus, both failed to identify Soundminer as malware even when it was recording and uploading data, according to the researchers.

In an e-mail statement, Google representatives did not directly address Soundminer but stated that Android is designed to minimize the impact of “poorly programmed or malicious applications if they appear on a device.”