Subscribe to:

Subscribe to :: TheGuruReview.net ::

LG Profits Rise

January 30, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

LG Display posted $1.245 billon in operating profit last year which is a 16.7 percent rise from a year earlier.

It is the largest increase in six years boosted by stronger demand for handset displays.

In a filing to the Korea Exchange, the LG affiliate said sales were down 2.1 percent.

Despite the drop in sales, its net profit jumped 119 percent on stronger margins.

This means that the company can pay its first dividend in four years.

Analysts were positive about the result and its outlook for the first quarter of this year.

LG supplies displays to Apple, HP, Dell, Sony and other top-tier Chinese TV makers.

The analyst said LG Display will benefit most among its chief Japanese and Taiwanese rivals as the Korean company is better in terms of output commitment, on-time delivery and better pricing.

LG Display, which is 37.9 percent owned by LG Electronics, said its moves to boost the sale of UHD displays for TVs to leading Chinese TV manufacturers also paid off.

Courtesy-Fud

Amazon Courting The Enterprise With New ‘WorkMail’ Service

January 30, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Amazon.com Inc ramped up its attempts to woo corporate clients by announcing an email and scheduling service that will compete with Microsoft Corp and Google Inc .

The service, dubbed WorkMail, will launch in the second quarter and has been developed by the company’s cloud computing unit, Amazon Web Services (AWS). It highlights Amazon’s efforts to convince deep-pocketed companies, called enterprises in tech parlance, to shift more of their work to AWS.

Launching an email and scheduling service is likely the first step toward a broader suite of Amazon tools to gain corporate clients, analysts said. For example, Google’s Gmail offers many other services beyond email and calendars including file-sharing and video conferencing.

AWS has spent the last couple of years trying to get corporate clients on board because big businesses spend more on data centers than startups, who were the initial focus of its business. But there are concerns that Amazon is spreading itself too thin, given its other sizeable investments in areas like Hollywood-style production and consumer devices.

“Email is a Trojan Horse into the enterprise,” Baird analyst Colin Sebastian said. He added that email is a $1 billion opportunity for Amazon given the popularity of AWS and Amazon’s willingness to sacrifice margins for volume.

If Amazon adds more services for companies, it could bring in about $10 billion more in extra revenue, Sebastian said.

 

 

Google Fiber Expanding South

January 29, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Google Fiber is expanding to the metro areas of Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham, N.C., reaching 18 cities in those areas.

The fiber optic cable service, with speeds of 1Gbps, is already active in the Kansas City area, as well as Provo, Utah, and Austin, Texas.

Google has been working with city leaders in the new areas for the past year, “and now the really hard work begins,” said Dennis Kish, vice president of Google Fiber in a blog posting.

He also said Google continues to explore bringing fiber to five other areas: Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose. Updates on those areas will come later this year.

Kish hailed findings by President Barack Obama and others that show fast Internet connections are vital to economic development. In cities such as Kansas City, Kans. and Kansas City, Mo., the construction of Google Fiber in residential areas started in 2012 and was opened to businesses by 2014. Google Fiber has also pushed AT&T to launch a number of competitive fiber projects.

“Fiber is on fire,” said Heather Burnett Gold, president of Fiber to the Home Council for the Americas, in reaction to Google’s announcement. “Communities must be planning/deploying gigabit infrastructure today in order to be part of the global economy tomorrow.”

City leaders in Raleigh welcomed the news as well.

“High-speed broadband can help cities enhance service deliver and civic engagement,” said Gail Roper, chief information and community relations officer for the City of Raleigh, in a statement.

 

DoS Bug Found In Android

January 29, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Mobile

Security researchers have discovered a bug in the Android WiFi Direct feature that could allow hackers to launch denial-of-service (DoS) attacks on Android devices.

WiFi Direct allows Android devices to connect to one another directly without needing a third-party device like a wireless router. The feature runs as standard in most Android smartphones today.

The guys at Core Security found the vulnerability, dubbed CVE-2014-0997, and said that a number of Android smartphones are vulnerable and can be affected by a DoS attack when scanning for WiFi Direct-capable devices.

An attacker could implement the DoS attack by sending a specially crafted 802.11 probe response frame “causing the Dalvik subsystem to reboot because of an Unhandle Exception on WiFiMonitor class”, said Core Security.

“On some Android devices processing a probe response frame with a WiFi-Direct (P2P) information element that contains a device name attribute with specific bytes generates a malformed supplicant event string that ends up throwing the IllegalArgumentException. As this exception is not handled the Android system restarts.”

In laymen’s terms, the attacker could essentially reboot an Android device remotely, knocking it off the wireless connection.

Devices currently affected by the bug include the Nexus 5 and Nexus 4 running Android version 4.4.4, the LG D806 and the Samsung SM-T310 running Android 4.2.2, and the Motorola RAZR HD running Android 4.1.2.

Core Security said that other devices could also be affected. Android 5.0 Lollipop is not vulnerable to the exploit, so the firm suggests that Android users should update to the latest version where possible.

Courtesy-TheInq

AMD’s Summit Ridge Processor Details Leaked

January 29, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

AMD’s first 14nm processors are codenamed Summit Ridge and they are reportedly based on an all-new architecture dubbed Zen.

Information on the new architecture and the Summit Ridge design is still very sketchy. According to Sweclockers, the chips will feature up to eight CPU cores, support for DDR4 memory and TDPs of up to 95W.

Summit Ridge will use a new socket, designated FM3. This suggests we are looking at A-series APUs, but there is no word on graphics and the eight-core design points to proper FX-series CPUs – we simply do not know at this point. It is also possible that Summit Ridge is a Vishera FX replacement, but on an FM socket rather than an AM socket.

Of course, AMD Zen should end up in more products than one, namely in APUs and Opteron server parts. The new architecture has been described as a “high-performance” design and will be manufactured using the Samsung-GlobalFoundries 14nm node.

As for the launch date, don’t hold your breath – the new parts are expected to show up in the third quarter of 2016, roughly 18 months from now.

Courtesy-Fud

Yahoo To Spinoff Shares In Alibaba

January 29, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Yahoo Inc plans to spin off its 15 percent stake in China’s Alibaba Group Holding Ltd , caving to demands to hand over to shareholders its prized e-commerce investment valued at roughly $40 billion.

The move to spin off the Alibaba stake satisfies a persistent investor demand, but could also ratchet up pressure on Yahoo Chief Executive Marissa Mayer to make quicker progress in strengthening Yahoo’s struggling media and advertising business.

“It’s not going to be easy from now on,” said B. Riley and Co analyst Sameet Sinha. “She has to perform now. There’s nothing shielding her.”

Shareholders feel that Yahoo and its stake in Alibaba would be worth more separately, as long as the Alibaba shares are not subject to the standard 35 percent tax rate that would be incurred from selling the shares.

Yahoo is worth approximately $45 billion. That includes its Alibaba stake of nearly $40 billion, meaning the current Yahoo share price assigns little value to the core business. Some investors believe the email, website and other operations are worth between $7 billion and $8 billion.

Yahoo, which is trying to reverse a multi-year decline in revenue, has faced increasing investor pressure more than two years after Mayer took the reins to lead a comeback plan.

Yahoo said its board of directors has authorized a plan to spin off the stake, tax-free, into a newly formed independent registered investment company. The stock of the company will be distributed pro-rata to Yahoo shareholders and the transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2015, Yahoo said.

The new entity will include Yahoo’s 384 million shares in Alibaba as well as an unspecified “legacy, ancillary” Yahoo business, the company said.

 

 

 

 

Facebook Testing New Stripped Down Version Of Its Mobile App

January 28, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

Facebook is testing a scaled down version of its mobile app that requires far less data, which could boost usage of the social networking service among people with weaker Internet service or older phones.

Facebook “Lite” is available for devices running Android 2.2 and up. The size of the free app is 252 kilobytes, and it’s meant for 2G networks in areas with limited connectivity. Users can perform a bunch of basic functions like post status updates with photos, comment on people’s posts, message friends, have group conversations, and receive notifications. Posts from the news feed are meant to load quickly.

Early reviews on the Google Play store for the app have been positive, with many praising its low data and battery usage.

Facebook launched the app over the weekend in parts of Africa and Asia, said a report in TechCrunch. A Facebook spokeswoman declined to comment further.

The Lite app appears to be related to Facebook’s Internet.org project, which seeks to provide free access to Facebook and other basic Internet services in developing countries. The Internet.org app is already available in a handful of countries such as Zambia, Tanzania, Kenya and Colombia. In addition to Facebook, the app provides access to other services like the weather, Wikipedia, and health and educational information. Carriers can charge users for paid access to other services. In addition to Facebook, other founding partners of Internet.org include Ericsson, Nokia and Samsung.

With the Lite app, Facebook might be testing people’s responsiveness to a set of basic Facebook services without the ancillary ones. It may also help Facebook learn how it could further improve the functions of its Internet.org app.

Facebook tested a different stripped down version of its site in late 2009 and early 2010, although only for the desktop. It was shut down in April 2010.

 

 

Dropbox Acquires Startup Pixelapse

January 28, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Dropbox, never one to shy away from an acquisition, has purchased startup Pixelapse, which provides a GitHub-like version control service for “tens of thousands” of visual designers. Terms of the deal have not been disclosed.

“Our new development efforts will be focused on bringing the same kinds of collaboration and workflow experiences that you’re used to in Pixelapse over to the core Dropbox product,” said the company’s traditional “hey we’ve been acquired” blog post about the deal.

The way Pixelapse works is simple and familiar to anyone who’s used a version control service like GitHub before: Visual design project files get stored in a dedicated folder. Make a change to a project asset, and those changes get synced to the cloud, where they’re viewable from a cloud interface. There’s even an activity feed to see who worked on what within a team.

If you or anybody else (the client you’ve shared the project with, the boss in charge of the project, or just the rest of the project team) wants, they can go back and view the entire history, comparing revisions and rolling back changes if necessary. You can even show off the history of a project to the public with an embeddable code widget.

If that sounds a lot like Dropbox’s existing version control, just tailored to a very specific vertical — namely, designers — collect your prize at the door. From Dropbox’s perspective, this is a shrewd move that enhances the platform’s appeal with a project management feature that developers love but designers could never access. The startup’s origins stem from co-founder Min Ming Lo’s time as a design intern at Google, where nobody had any idea what assets belonged to whom or how to give feedback.

For existing users, never fear. Pixelapse promises on its website that the service is safe for at least another year and that it’s still accepting sign-ups, which is a good omen given that so many similar deals of this type see immediate service shutdown.

 

 

Adobe Patches Flash Player Again

January 28, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

It’s patch week again for Adobe Flash Player, and this time the update is designed to fix a critical security bug in the much-maligned browser’s multimedia plug-in.

Flash Player has been updated to version 16.0.0.296 to solve the vulnerability previously identified in the APSA15-01 Security Bulletin. The bulletin now contains information about the new version.

Flash Player 16.0.0.296 was released with auto-update enabled on 24 January, two days earlier than the expected distribution date.

The standalone release was released on 26 January, as Adobe anticipated in the original bulletin, and users or sysadmins can download the full exe/msi installer straight from the official site.

Flash Player 16.0.0.296 is now available for Internet Explorer and the plug-in based browsers on Windows and Mac systems.

A new version (11.2.202.440) is available for Linux operating systems and Oracle Solaris on the same page that provides the Windows/Mac versions.

Adobe is also said to be working with the company’s “distribution partners” to make the update available for those browsers that embed the Flash plug-in, namely Internet Explorer 10 and 11 and Google Chrome.

Flash Player 16.0.0.296 is meant to end the exploitation of a zero-day vulnerability classified as CVE-2015-0311, for which a working exploit was already circulating in the wild.

Successful attacks via drive-by downloads were confirmed against machines running Internet Explorer and Firefox on Windows 8.1 and below.

The bug “could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system”, Adobe warned in the original security bulletin.

Installing the updated version of the Flash Player plug-in is recommended.

The new Flash Player release contains no new features apart from fixing the CVE-2015-0311 bug.

Courtesy-TheInq

New Internet Browser Vivaldi Launches

January 28, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Well known software developer Jon von Tetzchner has launched a new internet browser, offering an interface for high-volume users who “have problems fitting all their open tabs on one screen”, he said in a Reuters interview.

Known as Vivaldi and available on desktop computers from Tuesday, the browser’s initial launch covers the Windows, Mac and Linux platforms.

“A mobile phone and a tablet version are in the pipeline. We are working on it, but they won’t be out until they’re ready,” said von Tetzchner, who owns 90 percent of the company’s shares and has paid for the development.

“At some point it will need to fund it self and to reach that point we will need a few million users. I have no doubt that we will reach that number quite easily,” he added.

With features like personalized notes, bookmarks with small screen shots and speed dials with options for multiple groups and folders, Vivaldi hopes to attract high-volume users.

Despite tough competition from the likes of Google’s Chrome, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Apple’s Safari, Mozilla Corp’s Firefox and Opera Software’s browser, von Tetzchner believes there is still room for more.

“We welcome everyone, but this is first of all a browser for people who expect and need more,” he said. “There is without a doubt a demand for this type of browser even though I don’t expect it to take more than a few percent of the total market.”

Vivaldi has signed a few affiliation deals ahead of the launch and is in talks with several potential partners for functionalities like search and online shopping.

“We have made several deals and have started a dialogue with others. But because some of these are potential competitors, we’ve wanted to go live with the browser first.”

Named after the 18th century composer Antonio Vivaldi, the name carries an inescapable reference to von Tetzchner’s previous role as co-founder and long-time head of browser and mobile phone technology firm Opera Software.

 

Gas Stations Vulnerable To Cyberattacks

January 27, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

Over 5,000 devices used by gas stations in the U.S. to monitor their fuel tank levels can be hacked from the Internet by malicious attackers.

These devices, known as automated tank gauges (ATGs), are also used to trigger alarms in case of problems with the tanks, such as fuel spills.

“An attacker with access to the serial port interface of an ATG may be able to shut down the station by spoofing the reported fuel level, generating false alarms, and locking the monitoring service out of the system,” said HD Moore, the chief research officer at security firm Rapid7, in a blog post. “Tank gauge malfunctions are considered a serious issue due to the regulatory and safety issues that may apply.”

Earlier this month, Moore ran a scan to detect ATGs that are connected to the Internet through serial port servers that map ATG serial interfaces to the Internet-accessible TCP port 10001. This is a common set-up used by ATG owners to monitor the devices remotely.

“Approximately 5,800 ATGs were found to be exposed to the Internet without a password,” Moore said. “Over 5,300 of these ATGs are located in the United States, which works out to about 3 percent of the approximately 150,000 fueling stations in the country.”

Rapid7 decided to run the scan after being alerted of the problem by Jack Chadowitz, the founder of Kachoolie, a division of BostonBase that provides secure tank gauge access services.

Chadowitz had already developed an online service where ATG owners, particularly those using “a Gilbarco/Veeder Root TCP/IP card or a TCP/IP to serial converter such as those commonly available from Digi or Lantronix,” can check if they are at risk.

Some systems provide the capability to protect serial interfaces with a password, but this functionality is not commonly enabled, according to Moore.

 

 

Researchers At Georgia Tech Develop An Auto Detect Keyboard

January 27, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have emerged from their smoke filled labs with an intelligent keyboard which cleans itself and can identify users by the pattern and style of their fingertips and keystrokes.

Dubbed the “human-machine interfacing” device, the keyboard was reported in the American Chemical Society’s academic journal “Nano.”

If it works it could provide a foolproof way to prevent unauthorized users from gaining direct access to computers and stop the return key being clogged with navel fluff.

Enabled by a system of “contact electrification,” the keyboard senses typing patterns, the level of pressure applied to keys and speed – and it is accurate enough to distinguish one individual user from another.

The keyboard harnesses energy generated from all that typing to either power itself or another small device.  This means that you have to keep working or your keyboard will not work, so after a holiday both you and your keyboard might be sluggish.

“Conventional security measures such as personal identification numbers, tokens, or passwords can provide only limited protection, since they themselves are subject to illegitimate activities,” the research team wrote.

“Based on contact electrification, which is ubiquitous but under-explored, between human fingers and keys, the intelligent keyboard (IKB) converts typing motions on the keyboard into locally electric signals that can be harnessed for either touch-sensing or energy-harvesting purposes. Most significantly, the IKB allows a direct identification of personality in data input using the dynamic electronic signals generated when striking keys,” the article stated.

The scientists anticipate their device can be potentially applied “not only to self-powered electronics but also to artificial intelligence, cyber security, and computer or network access control.”

Courtesy-Fud

Hacker Forum Working To On Evolving Malware

January 27, 2015 by Michael  
Filed under Computing

Notorious malware kjw0rm and Sir DoOoM have been uncovered in a hacker forum as evolved versions, developed with advanced functionality, according to researchers at Trend Micro.

A threat response engineer at Trend Micro, Michael Marcos, said that he uncovered the malware while examining the Arabic language on a bogus “computer enthusiast site”, called dev-point.com forum.

“One of the notable topics in the forum talked about new malware ‘kjw0rm’ and a worm named ‘Sir DoOom’, which both came about after the release of the Njw0rm malware source code in the same forum,” he explained.

The Njw0rm’s source code was leaked in May 2013. The evolved kjw0rm is currently available in two versions, both of which have advanced infiltration and infection mechanisms.

The first Kjw0rm V2.0 appeared initially on the forum in January 2014, while the updated 0.5X version and new Sir DoOoM malware followed in December.

The V2.0 malware is the most basic of the three and reportedly hides itself in bogus files within infected systems.

“The propagation method of this malware targets all folders in the root directory of the removable drive,” read the advisory.

V0.5X follows a developed version of the same tactic, and Sir DoOoM adds an anti-virtual machine capability.

“[V0.5X] obfuscated some portions of the malware code. The malware author utilises an obfuscator tool that converts characters to hex values, adds filler functions, and performs computations that make analysis more difficult and time-consuming,” explained Marcos.

“[Sir DoOoM] also has an anti-virtual machine routine. It first searches for a list of the installed programs in the affected computer.

“If this variant found itself in a computer where a virtual machine program is installed, it will uninstall and terminate itself from the affected system. This prevents analysts testing to determine malware behaviour.”

Trend Micro senior engineer Bharat Mistry told V3 that the variants are dangerous as they add several advanced functions.

“Previous versions were there mainly for password stealing from browsers. As the malware has evolved, after the initial infections it now has the ability to download and execute Visual Basic code [VBS],” he said.

“VBS is a powerful coding language and can be used to interact directly with the operating system on the infected device.

“Also it now has the ability to recognise if it is being used in a security testing environment known as a sandbox by looking for the presence of a virtual machine.

“Finally the replication has also advanced with the use of hidden files on removable storage devices such as USB sticks.”

He added that the new powers could be used to mount a variety of attacks.

“The malware can be used to perform a number of different functions, including download, installation and execution of additional files or tools to potentially gain administrator or privilege credentials,” he said.

“Once this is gained hackers then have the ability to move laterally in the organisation and start looking for crown jewels or simply advertise that a point of presence has been created in a organisation that could then be ‘rented’ out to perform attacks, such as DDoS.”

Kjw0rm and Sir DoOoM’s appearance follows the discovery of several evolved attack tools. These include the defence-dodging Skeleton Key malware and the advanced Cryptowall 3.0 ransomware.

Courtesy-Theinq

Cablevision To Launch Wi-Fi Phone Service

January 27, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Mobile

Cablevision System Corp said that it would launch in February a wireless Internet phone service to give customers an alternative to more expensive data plans from cellular companies such as AT&T and Verizon.

The “Freewheel” phone service, which runs on any WiFi connection, is an attempt by Cablevision to retain and potentially add subscribers at a time when cable companies are losing out to lower-priced, bundled TV and Internet services from telecom firms.

Cablevision said the phone service was the first of its kind to be launched by a cable company and aims to tap users seeking to download unlimited amounts of data on their mobile phones using WiFi, which is less expensive than a cellular connection.

Such services could pose a challenge to traditional telecom carriers. Currently, carrier Republic Wireless and Massachusetts-based startup Scratch Wireless offer users similar services that use WiFi to control data costs.

“There has been a dramatic shift in how consumers use their mobile devices: today, it’s all about data, and WiFi is now preferred and clearly superior to cellular,” Kristin Dolan, chief operating officer of Cablevision, said in the statement.

Cablevision, controlled by New York’s Dolan family, has been investing in its “Optimum” WiFi network since 2007, setting up over 1.1 million WiFi hotspots or access points in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Cablevision’s WiFi phone service will be offered at $29.95 per month and $9.95 per month for subscribers of its “Optimum Online” service. It will be available exclusively on the Motorola Moto G smartphone that users will have to purchase, the company said.

The $180 Android phone will be sold to “Freewheel” users without a contract at a discounted price of $99.95, it added.

 

 

 

China Further Restricts Internet, Blocks VPN Access

January 26, 2015 by mphillips  
Filed under Around The Net

China is further tightening its grip on access to the Internet by blocking services that allow users to get around government censorship.

Several foreign-based operators of virtual private network (VPN) services said Friday that access to their services in China had been disrupted as a result of the crackdown and users are facing a harder time getting to some foreign websites.

Virtual private networks work by establishing an encrypted pipe between a computer or smartphone and a server in a foreign country. All communications are sent inside the pipe, effectively shielding Internet traffic from government filters that determine whether a site can be accessed. VPNs are used by Chinese citizens to get to external news sources and by resident foreigners and businesses for day-to-day communications.

StrongVPN, a commercial provider that operates a network of servers around the world, said users in China had recently begun experiencing connection problems to some of its sites. Comments alongside a company blog post indicate the list of sites affected is changing and sites that might work one day are failing the following day.

Another VPN provider, Golden Frog, told customers they might have more success connecting to services in Hong Kong or The Netherlands than those in the United States or Australia.

The Chinese government appears to be using two techniques to disrupt service, said Andrew Staples, a spokesman for Golden Frog. One, deep packet inspection, examines the data in Internet packets to try to determine if it’s a VPN connection. The other, IP blocking, shuts off traffic destined for the Internet addresses used by VPN servers.