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BP, Shell Promote Blockchain For Energy Trading

November 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A consortium including energy giants BP and Royal Dutch Shell will develop a blockchain-based digital platform for energy commodities trading expected to start by end-2018, the group said on Monday.

Other members of the consortium include Norwegian oil firm Statoil, trading houses Gunvor, Koch Supply & Trading, and Mercuria, and banks ABN Amro, ING and Societe Generale.

Blockchain technology, which first emerged as the architecture underpinning cryptocurrency bitcoin, uses a shared database that updates itself in real-time and can process and settle transactions in minutes using computer algorithms, with no need for third-party verification.

Mercuria has been a vocal advocate of implementing blockchain technology to significantly cut costs in oil trading.

“Ideally, it would help to eliminate any confusion over ownership of a cargo and potentially help to make managing risk more exact if there are accurate timestamps to each part of the trade,” said Edward Bell, commodities analyst at Dubai-based lender Emirates NBD PJSC.

Similar efforts for an energy trading platform have failed to take off, Bell said, but added this latest bid with backing from BP and Shell and the banks, “may have more success than if it were an independent party trying to convince oil and gas companies to make use of it.”

The new venture is seeking regulatory approvals and would be run as an independent entity, the consortium said in a statement.

“The platform aims to reduce administrative operational risks and costs of physical energy trading, and improve the reliability and efficiency of back-end trading operations…,” the statement said.

BlackBerry Settles Patent Dispute With BLU Products

October 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

BlackBerry Ltd announced that it inked a new license agreement with BLU Products Inc, a Florida-based maker of low-end Android phones, that would end patent disputes between the two companies.

Canada’s BlackBerry filed lawsuits against BLU in 2016, as part of the handset-maker-turned-software-company’s move to make cash off a bunch of technology patents it had collected in its heyday.

Thursday’s agreement will include on-going payments from BLU to BlackBerry, the companies said, but did not give further details.

The settlement will allow Blackberry “to focus on further licensing opportunities in the mobile communications market,” said Jerald Gnuschke, senior director of Intellectual Property Licensing at BlackBerry.

BlackBerry, which holds about 40,000 worldwide patents and applications, has been long been focusing on software sales and licensing after its once-popular phones lost out to Apple and others in the smartphone industry.

Do Brother Printers Pose A Security Risk Online

October 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A security researcher has found nearly 700 Brother printers left exposed online, allowing access to the password reset function to anyone who knows what to look for.

Ankit Anubhav, Principal Researcher at NewSky Security said the printers offer full access to their administration panel over the Internet.

According to Bleeping Computer https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/hundreds-of-printers-expose-backend-panels-and-password-reset-functions-online/ a wide range of Brother printer models, such as DCP-9020CDW, MFC-9340CDW, MFC-L2700DW, or MFC-J2510 have the issue.

The cause of all these exposures is Brother’s choice of shipping the printers with no admin password. Most organizations most likely connected the printers to their networks without realizing the admin panel was present and wide open to connections.

These printers are now easy discoverable via IoT search engines like Shodan or Censys.

Organisations running Brother printers should verify if the printer exposes the administration panel by default online, and/or set a custom password to prevent unauthorised access to the device.

Courtesy-Fud

Apple, Accenture Team Up For Better Business Apps

August 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Technology giant Apple Inc and professional services firm Accenture PLC announced that they will team up to help businesses build better applications for iOS, the operating system that powers Apple’s iPhone and iPad.

Accenture helps large companies write new software and adopt new technology. The company will create special teams dedicated to helping its customers, which include banks and retailers, write iOS apps. Apple employees, including software engineers and user-interface designers, will work alongside Accenture engineers on the teams.

The first joint team will be located in San Francisco, Gene Reznik, senior managing director of technology and ecosystem at Accenture told Reuters. The companies did not say how many combined Apple-Accenture teams will eventually exist.

 But the engineering teams will focus on apps that are used by front-line workers and consumers, such as apps that run on iPads for the lobbies of retail banks, where a teller and a customer might both interact with the app.

“If you look at something like retail banking, you can imagine really redesigning the apps and coming up with a unique perspective on how agents can interact with their customers,” Reznik said.

Reznik said another focus will be so-called augmented reality, in which digital objects float over real objects on a screen. That technology could be useful to service technicians in the field, for example by pointing an iPhone or iPad at an engine and highlighting a faulty part that needs repair.

For Apple, the partnership is part of a continued push to win over business clients and try to knock Microsoft Corp from its long-held throne as the default operating system in the corporate world. To that end, Apple has established partnerships with International Business Machines Corp, Cisco Systems Inc, Deloitte and SAP SE aimed at moving more business applications over to iOS devices and making them easier to use in corporate settings.

“All those features really help it be a better overall productivity machine,” Susan Prescott, vice president of application product marketing at Apple, told Reuters. “It’s becoming more realistic for more workers to use iOS as their primary device.”

VMWare, Google Partner Up Over Chrome Devices For The Enterprise

August 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

VMware’s AirWatch subsidiary has teamed up with Google to enable unified end-point management (UEM) of all Chrome OS devices in an enterprise.

Through VMware Workspace ONE’s cloud portal, IT admins will be able to manage Chrome devices in their company alongside all other endpoints from a single console.

Among other things, IT managers will be able to perform a number of tasks including on-boarding employees; provisioning, auditing and tracking hardware; device wiping; and securing access to personalized enterprise app catalogs.

With new enterprise-ready capabilities from Chrome Enterprise License, companies will also be able to control device policies using a customizable assignment of groups based on geography, device platform, department, and employee role. The goal is to simplify policy enforcement across an enterprise, VMware said.

“The consumerization of the enterprise has left IT managing multiple operating systems on a variety of devices – some provided by the business and others brought in by employees,” said Sumit Dhawan, general manager of End-User Computing at VMware. “As Chrome OS continues to gain momentum, our customers are eager to manage these devices consistently along with all other endpoints, including mobile devices.”

Through Workspace ONE, VMware AirWatch users will also be able to securely manage the lifecycle of Chromebooks, Dhawan added.

In March, VMware’s AirWatch announced a partnership aimed at accelerating the adoption of Chromebooks by enhancing existing application accessibility of the devices through VMware Workspace ONE. That collaboration enabled one-click secure authentication and management of apps – cloud, web and virtual – for organizations deploying Chromebooks.

While it’s an industry first in terms of the Google partnership, VMware’s move to enable UEM highlights a larger trend as the enterprise mobility management (EMM) software market quickly consolidates. As a result, tools for provisioning, configuring and securing mobile devices are being subsumed into larger product suites.

Is Google Glass Making A Comeback

July 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

It appears the death of Google Glass has been somewhat exaggerated, as the accompanying MyGlass app has received its first update in three years.

For the first time since September 2014, you can suck up some bug fixes to your ridiculous goggles, recently seen adorning the newly opened “Museum of Failure” in Sweden.

But not only that! There’s a new set of firmware too!

We’re not entirely sure who is still wearing the early wearable devices which despite a huge fanfare, never really got to the high street, but if you do, it’s good to know that you four-figure investment hasn’t gone the way of Google Reader.

So what’s new? Well, the biggest news is Bluetooth. Yes, actually ruddy Bluetooth support. Because it had a Bluetooth chip all along that was never activated.

This actually is quite a big deal. It means that you can now hook up Human Interface Devices (HID) such as keyboards and mice and do a bit more than the “tap and slide” controls you had before.

But who is still working on the project? Surely Google isn’t paying for the continuing development of a project that hasn’t even had a working web presence for two years?

Perhaps it’s the 20 percenters, using their free time at Google to tinker with the former favourite. Or perhaps the successor for Google Glass, oft suggested but never realised is closer than we thought.

We were told that a Google Glass 2 with enterprise credentials was on the way in 2015, powered by an Intel chipset, but nothing emerged.

It’s not like the device didn’t find fans. Virgin Atlantic used it at check in to allow staff to keep better eye contact with customers.

But before there was a drone epidemic and alleged Russian hacking of elections, everyone was frantic about what would happen when we all walked around with head-up displays.

Turns out nobody did, and nobody has. Battery life was a big problem and turning on Bluetooth will do little to improve that. But someone, somewhere clearly thinks there’s life in the old dog yet. What it all means remains to be seen.

Courtesy-TheInq

Facebook Teach Chatbots To Negotiate

June 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Chatbots are being taught how to drive a hard bargain in a new AI experiment carried out by Facebook’s Labs.

According to New Scientist, the research could lead to more effective personal assistants able to negotiate on our behalf, sorting out calendar clashes and the like.

French website Julie Desk is already offering this kind of AI diary management, but now Facebook has jumped on the bandwagon, looking at perhaps getting you a good deal on your next holiday, according to Mike Lewis from the social network’s boffin division.

The team trained bots on a database of over 5,000 text conversations between people playing a game where they had to divvy up an inventory of “things”. Each “thing” was assigned a value, with the values unique to each player and each item. So, for example, a ball might be worth four to one player, but only two to another.

The object of the game, as in most games, is to score the most points, by acquiring the most objects with the highest personal value.

After learning, the bots were further trained with more matches, some against each other, some against humans. Working in natural language often led to a crappy deal. Working in totally selfish terms often led to a great deal, but often one made in utter gobbledegook.

The trick, therefore, was to find a way of combining techniques to produce something that would allow the bots to communicate with humans in a real world scenario. The result was a good (but not brilliant) negotiator who can work with humans on their terms.

Beyond doing work for you, a bot might be able to give you useful tips when doing a deal that perhaps you don’t want to hand over. Say you’re negotiating a house price, it could be able to tell you how much of your hand to play and what not to say.

Oliver Lemon at Heriot-Watt University explained that the use of natural language was essential as a user would need to be able to go back to a deal and work out why it did what it did – in other words, justification is important when you’re a bot.

Late last year we reported on UCLA students who had created a Judge Rinderbot.

Courtesy-TheInq

Google Sells Robotics Business Units To SoftBank

June 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

SoftBank Group Corp announced that it has agreed to acquire two firms that build walking robots from Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc, adding to the Japanese company’s growing artificial intelligence portfolio.

SoftBank said it would buy Boston Dynamics and Tokyo-based Schaft, which design and manufacture robots that simulate human movement, but did not disclose the terms of the transactions.

Shares of the company rose as much as 7.9 percent after the deal was announced, hitting a 17-year high.

“Smart robotics are going to be a key driver of the next stage of the information revolution, and Marc (Raibert) and his team at Boston Dynamics are the clear technology leaders in advanced dynamic robots,” SoftBank Group Chairman Masayoshi Son said in a statement on Friday.

Raibert is CEO and founder of Boston Dynamics.

SoftBank has embarked on an aggressive acquisition campaign to boost its research and development capabilities. The group is backing the $93 billion Vision Fund, the world’s largest private equity fund that seeks to invest in technologies expected to grow significantly in the near future, such as robotics and artificial intelligence.

Son, Japan’s richest man, describes the fund as essential for setting up SoftBank for a data “gold rush” which he expects to happen as the global economy becomes increasingly digitized.

Boston Dynamics and Schaft could eventually be vested with the Vision Fund, a person familiar with the deal told Reuters

Schaft, a University of Tokyo spinoff, develops bipedal robots designed to negotiate uneven terrain.

“Robotics as a field has great potential, and we’re happy to see Boston Dynamics and Schaft join the SoftBank team to continue contributing to the next generation of robotics,” an Alphabet spokesperson said.

Boston Dynamics has produced a number of robots that mimic human and animal movement, including Atlas, a humanoid model that co-ordinates motion and balance using its arms and legs and can pick itself up off the ground when knocked over.

It is best known for building robots that look as if they belong in science-fiction movies and are often co-developed or funded by the U.S. military. Its military projects would mean the acquisition is likely to be subject to regulatory approval from Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

The company was acquired by Google in 2013 during a robotics shopping spree led by Android creator Andy Rubin, but the team struggled to find its place within the tech giant after Rubin’s departure, former Boston Dynamics employees said.

“They’re advancing the state of the art in independent robotics. They are probably the leader in the U.S.,” said Arnis Mangolds, a robotics expert who has worked with Boston Dynamics.

“But the problem is it’s not ready for prime time, and very few people have a tolerance for that.”

Satellite Radio Sirius Company Seeks Investment In Pandora

June 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Sirius XM Holdings Inc, the U.S. satellite radio company controlled by John Malone’s Liberty Media Corp, is seeking to invest in internet music provider Pandora Media Inc, people familiar with the matter said.

Sirius XM is negotiating a private investment in public equity (PIPE) after talks about Sirius XM acquiring Pandora in its entirety ended unsuccessfully over price disagreements, the sources said on Wednesday.

If the negotiations between Sirius XM and Pandora come to fruition, the deal would come after private equity firm KKR & Co LP agreed last month to invest $150 million in Pandora.

KKR’s agreement gave Pandora a 30-day-period to look for an alternative deal. This period expires on Thursday, and so Sirius XM was racing late on Wednesday to beat that deadline and clinch its own investment in Pandora, the sources said.

The terms of Sirius XM’s proposed PIPE investment could not be learned, and sources cautioned that the latest negotiations between Sirius XM and Pandora could still fall apart. Liberty Media may also object to any deal, the sources added.

The sources asked not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential. Pandora declined to comment, while Sirius XM and Liberty Media did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Any partnership between Sirius XM and Pandora would be a boon to both companies, given that they target a common audience. Pandora is seeking to become more popular with drivers, many of whom subscribe to Sirius XM, while Sirius XM is looking to expand its internet and mobile presence.

A PIPE deal involves the sale of a company’s shares in a private offering, as opposed to a public secondary offering.

Will Canonical IPO Be A Success?

May 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Linux outfit Canonical appears to have been making rather a lot of changes lately and its founder Mark Shuttleworth said that it is because the company is gearing up for an IPO.

Canonical was doing well with Ubuntu and cloud and container-related technologies, such as Juju, LXD, and Metal-as-a-Service (MaaS).

In addition, its OpenStack and Kubernetes software stacks, according to Shuttleworth, are growing by leaps and bounds on both the public and private cloud.

He said that in the last year, Ubuntu cloud growth had been 70 percent on the private cloud and 90 percent on the public cloud.

“Ubuntu has been gaining more customers on the big five public clouds.”

Canonical’s attempt to make Unity the universal interface for desktops, tablets, and smartphones had failed and while Shuttleworth was personally invested in this project it was not viable when you had an IPO looming.

Other steps are likely as the company works out what steps we need to take towards an IPO.

That means focusing on Canonical’s most profitable lines.

“Ubuntu will never die because it is the default platform on cloud computing. Juju, MaaS, and OpenStack are nearly unstoppable. We need to work out more of our IoT path. At the same time, we had to cut out those parts that could not meet an investors’ needs. The immediate work is get all parts of the company profitable,” Shuttleworth said.

Courtesy-Fud

Research Reveals Nearly A Third Of Virtual Servers Sit Idle

May 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Newly revealed research has discovered that 25% of all physical servers — and 30% of all virtual servers — are idle. These are systems that have no activity in the last six months.

The problem with comatose, or zombie, physical servers is well known. Past studies have routinely put the number of undead enterprise physical servers in the 20% to 30% range. But this latest research looked at virtual servers as well, and they may represent a significant cost to IT departments.

That’s because users may be paying licensing fees on their virtual servers, as well as on the software they support, said the researchers.

Comatose servers, both virtual and physical, may also represent “an unappreciated security risk” because they aren’t patched and maintained, according to the research paper by Jonathan Koomey, a research fellow at Stanford University, and Jon Taylor, a partner at the Anthesis Group, a consulting firm.

Koomey and Taylor looked at 16,000 servers in about 10 data centers using data collected by TSO Logic, an energy efficiency software vendor. This study is an update of the earlier one, which found that 30% of all physical servers were comatose. The decrease to 25% in these results may be a result of the larger sample size.

The cost of running comatose systems varies depending on age and whether it has been fully depreciated or whether all the invested value in the physical server has been realized, said Taylor in an interview. “The easiest argument to make is the waste in energy it’s consuming,” said he said.

With regard to virtual servers, “it was shocking how equally large it was,” he said, noting the costs for virtual server licensing and licenses for any software still running on the server. “I think they are draining a lot of operational cost.”

The problem may be one of motivation: IT managers aren’t necessarily measured on well they control costs.

“The most important measure of an IT shop is typically availability,” said Leon Kappelman, a professor of information systems at the College of Business at the University of North Texas.

Kappelman, who had no involvement with the study, said it’s important to understand the context behind why a server is idle. He knows of users who keep servers sitting for months because they are used for backup, especially when needed to meet seasonable demands.

“They are addressing a real problem,” said Kappelman, of the study. “There is waste in IT and there has always have been.”

European Union Anticipates More E-commerce Anti-trust Violation Investigations

May 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

The European Union plans to initiate more antitrust investigations into e-commerce companies after a two-year inquiry uncovered practices that restrict competition, the European Commission said on Wednesday.

In its report following the initial inquiry, the European Commission said there was an increased use of contractual restrictions to control product distribution, which could be in breach of EU antitrust rules.

“Certain practices by companies in e-commerce markets may restrict competition by unduly limiting how products are distributed throughout the EU,” Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement.

The e-commerce sector inquiry is part of the European Commission’s campaign to overhaul the bloc’s digital market in a bid to boost growth and catch up with the United States and Asia.

“The insight gained from the sector inquiry will enable the Commission to target EU antitrust enforcement in European e-commerce markets, which will include opening further antitrust investigations,” the Commission said.

The EU executive also found that manufacturers increasingly use selective distribution systems where products can only be sold by pre-authorized sellers, giving them more control over distribution and price.

The report showed that almost 60 percent of digital content providers have agreed with the copyright holders for music, films and TV shows, for example, to geoblock, namely restricting consumers’ access to products and services based on where they are located.

Some licensing practices may also make it more difficult for new online business models and services to emerge, the Commission said.

EU antitrust scrutiny of the pharmaceutical, energy and financial services industries over the past decade prompted investigations into companies in all three sectors.

Renewable Energy Now The Cheapest Source For New Electric Power

April 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

While investments in renewable energy fell last year, a big drop in unsubsidized costs for new wind and solar power installations indicated that they remain popular energy alternatives.

Last year, the average “levelized cost” or total cost of generating power from solar worldwide dropped 17% percent, onshore wind costs dropped 18% and offshore wind turbine power costs fell 28%, according to a new report from the United Nations and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF).

“Well, after the dramatic cost reductions of the past few years, unsubsidized wind and solar can provide the lowest cost new electrical power in an increasing number of countries, even in the developing world — sometimes by a factor of two,” Michael Liebreich, chairman of the Advisory Board at BNEF, said in the report.

The average capital cost for solar power projects of new construction in 2016 was 13% lower than in 2015, while for onshore wind the drop was 11.5% and for offshore wind, 10%.

“It’s a whole new world: even though investment is down, annual installations are still up; instead of having to subsidize renewables, now authorities may have to subsidize natural gas plants to help them provide grid reliability,” Liebreich said.

Last year, more gigawatts of solar power were added (75GW) than of any other technology for the first time. Trailing behind solar, in order of net gigawatts installed, were wind, coal, gas, large hydroelectric, nuclear and biomass.

Renewable energy accounted for 55% of new worldwide power last year, or a total of 138.5 gigawatts (GW). That compares with 127.5GW of new renewable energy in 2015; and renewable power installed in 2016 was done so at a cost 23% lower than 2015, the report showed.

Since 2010, the dollars committed per year to new renewable energy worldwide — excluding hydroelectric — have increased roughly five-fold, and have since oscillated between $234 billion and $312 billion, the report said.

“A major reason why installations increased, even though dollars invested fell, was a sharp reduction in capital costs for solar photovoltaics, onshore and offshore wind,” the report said.

At the same time, because of the drop in prices, last year, the overall investment in renewable energy plummeted 23% to $241.6 billion from the record established in 2015; it was the lowest total investment since 2013.

Investment in new renewables capacity was roughly double that in fossil fuel generation in 2016, for the fifth successive year. The proportion of global electricity coming from renewable sources rose from 10.3% in 2015 to 11.3% in 2016, and prevented the emission of an estimated 1.7 gigatons of CO2.

Smart energy hardware such as smart meters, energy storage sources and associated IoT technologies also saw record investments last year. Asset finance for smart meters and energy storage, plus equity raised for specialist companies in energy efficiency, storage and electric vehicles, totalled a record $41.6 billion last year. That was up 29%.

In the U.S., utilities and private energy companies are increasingly investing in smart grid technology, including microgrids.

Mozilla To End Firefox’s Aurora Preview Track

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Mozilla has announced it will discontinue one of Firefox’s preview tracks that have allowed users to test early versions of the browser before wider deployment.

Companies running Firefox, and testing the browser using the “Aurora” track, will be automatically migrated to the “Beta” channel today.

“It became clear that Aurora was not meeting our expectations as a first stabilization channel,” wrote Dave Camp, director of engineering for Firefox; Sylvestre Ledru, the browser’s release manager; and Ali Spivak, head of developer marketing, in a post to a Mozilla blog.

Mozilla has offered multiple versions of each Firefox edition since 2011, when it began offering four builds — Nightly, Aurora, Beta and Release — each of which was supposed to be more stable than the previous.

“We have more modern processes underlying our [release] train model, and believe we can deliver feature-rich, stable products without the additional 6-8-week Aurora phase,” said Camp, Ledru and Spivak.

In that “train” approach, Mozilla added a new feature to the least stable version, Developer, then when the feature was ready, moved it to the next track, Aurora. As development progressed, the feature would shift to Beta and then finally to Release.

But Mozilla acknowledged that the system had sometimes failed. “The release cycle time has required that we subvert the model regularly over the years by uplifting new features to meet market requirements,” the company admitted in an accompanying FAQ, referring to times when it has had to skip one of the tracks or shorten the time a feature spent on one.

Firefox users on the Aurora channel were to be moved to Beta today, according to the FAQ. Aurora will not be updated after tomorrow, when Firefox 53 is to ship in final, or Release, form.

With Aurora’s disappearance, Mozilla will rely on Beta for the first widespread distribution of each edition of Firefox. To make up for Aurora’s absence, each beta will be rolled out in stages, just as Release has long been, with the idea that if major problems crop up, they do so early on and thus affect only a subset of customers before the spigot is turned off.

Aurora’s elimination will not increase the frequency of Release builds issued or decrease the time between each Release version; the latter will continue to range from six to nine weeks. Nor will the already-slated dates for future versions of Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release) change. That edition, designed for enterprises and other large organizations, remains stable for approximately a year. Much like Windows 10’s LTSB (Long-term Servicing Branch), ESR receives only security updates.

Ditching Aurora, however, will let Mozilla move a new feature from inception to final about six to eight weeks faster than before.

Trello Updated To Integrate With BitBucket, Jira, HipChat And Confluence

March 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Trello will be linked into the entire Atlassian ecosystem with a series of integrations announced this week. The new “power-ups” for the project management software connect it with BitBucket, Jira, HipChat and Confluence, to help customers get their work done more efficiently.

Using Trello is intended to help users keep their projects organized. The service lets people lay out virtual cards in columns on a workspace known as a board. Doing so can help with things like tracking the status of software bugs or tracking contracts through different stages of completion.

Each of the connections announced Wednesday is supposed to help with the process of using Trello. Confluence users can now tie cards to new pages in Atlassian’s content management system, Jira users can connect issues from the bug tracker with cards and BitBucket users can better organize their code.

The integrations come two months after Atlassian announced that it would be acquiring Trello. They show a glimpse of a future where the project management software is increasingly tied into the other products that Atlassian owns.

Customers were asking for the integrations as soon as Atlassian’s acquisition of Trello was announced, according to Hamid Palo, the director of product and partnerships at Trello. Overall, the goal behind them is to minimize how much users have to switch between different services, in order to save time.

The acquisition and power-ups don’t mean that competing services will be boxed out of connecting with the work tracking software, Palo said.

“We’re going to continue making Trello awesome, we’re going to integrate with all of the tools that people use with Trello, and that is not going to change,” he said.

All of the integrations announced on Wednesday are available immediately, for no extra cost.

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