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Will The Need For A.I. Researchers Slow Down The Progress

December 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

A new report from Chinese tech giant Tencent said that there are only 300,000 “AI researchers and practitioners” worldwide, but the “market demand” is for millions of roles.

The report confirms what tech giants have been complaining about – apparently an AI engineer can demand a high salary for her or his skills. Those with a few years’ experience can expect base pay of between $300,000 and $500,000 while the very best can collect millions.

One independent AI lab said that there were only 10,000 individuals worldwide with the right skills to spearhead serious new AI projects.

Tencent’s new “2017 Global AI Talent White Paper” suggests the bottleneck here is education. It estimates that 200,000 of the 300,000 active researchers are already employed in various industries – not just tech – while the remaining 100,000 are still studying.

Attendance in machine learning and AI courses has rocketed in recent years, as has enrollment in online courses, but there is obviously a lag as individuals complete their education.

The report also speculates about the global competition to develop and deploy AI skilled. Experts in the US warning that America is falling behind rivals like China in the so-called global AI race.

The report itself identifies the US, China, Japan, and UK as key players, with Israel and Canada also warranting mentions. Canada, it says, has strong educational background (which has attracted many big companies to launch research labs there), while the UK is best on the “ethical and legal aspects” of AI, and Japan takes the lead in robotics.

The US is currently “far ahead” in terms of global talent, with more universities teaching machine learning and related subjects than any other nation, and more AI startups. The downside is that the US education system only teaches the rich (or the poor on sporting scholarships) who are not always the most intelligent nor the most numerous.

This means that eventually the US will eventually lose its lead to China.

Courtesy-Fud

Amazon’s Alexa For Business Eyes The Enterprise Market

December 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Much as smartphones did in the late 2000s,voice-activated A.I. assistants like Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant appear ready to migrate from homes into the workplace. That’s the the idea behind this month’s launch of Alexa for Business by Amazon’s cloud computing subsidiary, Amazon Web Services.

The virtual assistant, unveiled at the company’s Re:Invent conference, is aimed at automating and simplifying a variety of tedious office tasks. It allows users to check calendars, reorder supplies, set up meetings and kick off video conference calls using voice commands directed at its Echo devices.

Amazon is not the first to target its intelligent assistant for workplace uses. Cisco, for example, announced its Spark Assistant last month; it’s designed specifically to take some of the pain out of organizing video conferences.  Microsoft, meanwhile, has integrated Cortana with its Office 365 applications.

All of those moves serve to highlight the emergence of natural language processing and voice recognition and the potential for a new way of interacting with workplace software.

“Voice will very much have a big part to play in how we collaborate and work over the next 10  years,” said IDC research director Wayne Kurtzman. “The Alexa and Cisco announcements are both key indicators of that.”

There are already tens of thousands of Alexa skills available to consumer users that are now accessible with Alexa for Business; beyond that, Amazon expects companies will start to build their own skills for internal purposes.

Capital One, for example, has built a skill that enables IT staff to quickly check the status of corporate systems and receive updates on high-severity incidents.

Another user, WeWork, has placed Amazon Echo devices around offices at its headquarters as part of a pilot project. The WeWork set-up, touted by Amazon. allows employees to reserve meetings rooms, start meetings and file help-desk tickets.

A range of companies, including Salesforce, SAP SuccessFactors, Concur, Ring Central and ServiceNow are also integrating their applications with Alexa for Business. Users can also access corporate applications through their home devices, in effect giving them the ability to ask Alexa what important meetings are lined up on a given day, and make changes to personal work schedule.

All of those moves serve to highlight the emergence of natural language processing and voice recognition and the potential for a new way of interacting with workplace software.

“Voice will very much have a big part to play in how we collaborate and work over the next 10  years,” said IDC research director Wayne Kurtzman. “The Alexa and Cisco announcements are both key indicators of that.”

There are already tens of thousands of Alexa skills available to consumer users that are now accessible with Alexa for Business; beyond that, Amazon expects companies will start to build their own skills for internal purposes.

Capital One, for example, has built a skill that enables IT staff to quickly check the status of corporate systems and receive updates on high-severity incidents.

Another user, WeWork, has placed Amazon Echo devices around offices at its headquarters as part of a pilot project. The WeWork set-up, touted by Amazon. allows employees to reserve meetings rooms, start meetings and file help-desk tickets.

A range of companies, including Salesforce, SAP SuccessFactors, Concur, Ring Central and ServiceNow are also integrating their applications with Alexa for Business. Users can also access corporate applications through their home devices, in effect giving them the ability to ask Alexa what important meetings are lined up on a given day, and make changes to personal work schedule.

Republic Wireless Building It’s Own Smart Speaker System

November 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Phone calls are still new features for both the Amazon Echo and Google Home smart speakers, both of which focused on music and house controls before adding calling.

Wireless carrier Republic Wireless announced plans to take the opposite approach, saying it will enter the space with a speaker that appears to be all about phone calls.

The Anywhere HQ is the company’s first hardware product. It’s an LTE-connected speaker that can be used to make calls, as well as issue commands.

Like “Alexa” on Echo and “OK Google” on Google Home, Anywhere HQ will require customers to use a start phrase — something like “OK Republic” — before it will make a call.

The speaker itself has volume and mute controls on top and a full number pad underneath.

Republic, a mobile virtual network operator that runs on Sprint, T-Mobile and Wi-Fi, said the speaker also has a built-in smart assistant and works with a customer’s phone number.

Anywhere HQ is part of Republic Wireless’ Labs program, where it’s being tested. Pricing and availability aren’t yet available, and the fine print on the announcement says that it can’t be sold until it obtains authorization from the Federal Communications Commission.

Republic Wireless didn’t immediately return a request for comment about further details.

Amazon Echo Users Lean Towards Apple, Study Says

October 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

What does your choice of smart speaker reveal about your other preferences?

If you choose a Google Home speaker, does that mean you drift Android-ward? And what if you bought an Amazon Echo?

Well, let me tell you. I have just been made smarter by a piece of research from securities intelligence consultancy Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.

It chatted with 300 Amazon Echo and Google Homeowners between July 11 and 27.

It concluded that those who own an Echo — which reminds me of the result of an ill-starred relationship between an air-purifier and a lipstick — have a penchant for Cupertino.

Of those surveyed, 55 percent of Echo users have an iPhone. The remainder have Android. Conversely, 75 percent of those who bought the oversized salt cellar known as Google Home are committed to Android phones.

Josh Lowitz, partner and co-founder of CIRP, insisted in a press release that the proportion of iPhone owners among Echo users was higher than the phone’s share of the US market. That stands at roughly 34 percent.

As for the proportion of Android users among Homeowners, that was merely consistent with Android’s share of the US phone market, he said. (Numbers vary as to how big Android’s share is. Some place it at around the 55 percent mark.)

Lowitz didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

When it comes to tablets, Echo owners also skew toward Apple, says the research. 49 percent have an iPad, while 25 percent own an Amazon Fire tablet.

Amazon, Google Take Feud Public

September 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

In a rare public feud between titans of technology, Amazon.com Inc said on Tuesday its Echo Show devices could no longer play videos from YouTube because the site’s parent, Google, stopped supporting the service.

The spat is the latest in Silicon Valley in which competitive tensions stood in the way of customers. Amazon and Google square off in many areas, from cloud computing and online search, to selling voice-controlled gadgets like the Echo Show.

In a statement, Amazon said, “As of this afternoon, Google has chosen to no longer make YouTube available on Echo Show, without explanation and without notification to customers. There is no technical reason for that decision, which is disappointing and hurts both of our customers.”

Google, owned by Alphabet Inc, said instead that the development was no surprise.

 “We’ve been in negotiations with Amazon for a long time, working towards an agreement that provides great experiences for customers on both platforms,” it said in a statement. “Amazon’s implementation of YouTube on the Echo Show violates our terms of service, creating a broken user experience. We hope to be able to reach an agreement and resolve these issues soon.”

The Echo Show had displayed YouTube videos without integral features, from video recommendations to channel subscriptions. Google has been in a similar dispute with Microsoft Corp in the past.

It was not clear how many customers were affected. Amazon only started selling the Echo Show in June, which comes with a touchscreen and responds by voice command.

Amazon’s suite of Echo devices, including the Echo and Echo Dot, have outsold the voice-controlled Google Home, according to research firm eMarketer. Amazon has ambitions to make it normal for people to control computers by voice – and to place orders for its online retail business by voice, too.

“It’s a bit of a blow to Amazon,” said analyst Jan Dawson of Jackdaw Research. “YouTube is one of the big video services that they had in addition to their own. For that to disappear means a big chunk of the possible video content you could watch on Echo Show is now gone.”

The Verge, a technology news website, earlier reported the news.

Will China Become The Leader In A.I.

September 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

The CEO of China-based Horizon Robotics, Yu Kai, claims that China could become very important in the development of AI chips.

While it has been late to arrive in the PC processor world, that era is about to come to an end with the death of Moore’s law. Instead computers will obtain speed from AI chips and China is better equipped to develop these Yu claims.

Talking to the assembled throngs at the Artificial Intelligence Summit (CAIS) 2017, Yu said his company has set up an AI research and development center in Nanjing, focusing on developing embedded AI solutions for smart driving, smart living and smart cities.

Since the China government released a plan to promote new-generation AI development in early July 2017, all related sectors in the country have been gearing up for the development of AI technologies and applications, Yu said.

Yu said Moore’s Law was entering a new stage, featuring a gradual swift of logical computing to smart computing, with dedicated AI processors needed to handle smart computing and constituting a new business field which China firms can tap into.

China was also benefiting from the movement of computing from the center to the edge. Computing in the PC era was done locally, then massive computing was channeled through browsers and done in the cloud, and now cloud computing is moving slowly to terminal computing along with the Internet progressing to mobile network and then to Internet of Everything (IoE).

In the AI era, massive computing needs mainly come from the terminal side, but cloud computing could hardly satisfy the requirements for real-time and low latency computing as well as better user experience by the terminal side, Yu said.

The next thing which will happen is that edge computing technology will facilitate much faster, higher-volume AI computing. China boasts a great opportunity for developing embedded AI processors and algorithms, which can be applied to grant intelligence to terminal sensors and lenses used in self-driving cars and smart cities.

He said that Horizon Robotics was developing an embedded AI processor that features an extremely low power consumption of only 2W and is two to three times faster than its best counterpart available now in computing performance, yet at a cost of only one twentieth, according to Yu.

Courtesy-Fud

Amazon Is Developing It’s Own ‘Smart Glasses’

September 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Amazon.com Inc is busy developing its first wearable device – a pair of ‘smart glasses’, the Financial Times reported earlier this week.

The device, designed like a regular pair of spectacles, will allow Amazon’s digital assistant Alexa to be summoned anytime at all places, the report said, citing people familiar with the plans.

There would be a bone-conduction audio system in the device to allow the wearer to hear Alexa without inserting headphones into his or her ears, according to the report.

Amazon was not immediately available to comment on the report outside regular business hours.

Earlier this year, Alphabet Inc re-introduced its own wearable glass headset, Google Glass, after discontinuing its production last year.

Will A.I. Replace Teachers

September 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

There are probably schools where any machines, including PCs and laptops, are regularly stolen because the kids have gone all Lord of the Flies. Things are probably not like that at Wellington College, which is where the prediction has come from.

In a report in The Independent, Sir Anthony Sheldon waxed lyrical about the potential and possibilities of artificial intelligence (AI) and automated teachers.

“School teachers will lose their traditional role and effectively become little more than classroom assistants” reports the paper.

“They will remain on hand to set up equipment, help children when necessary and maintain discipline.”

This sounds a bit like current teaching, where a television, overhead projector or computer can be wheeled into a classroom and turned on and left to teach.

Sheldon is convinced about this and is excited about the possibility of every kid getting the kind of education that money pays for.

“It certainly will change human life as we know it. It will open up the possibility of an Eton or Wellington education for all. Everyone can have the very best teacher and it’s completely personalised; the software you’re working with will be with you throughout your education journey. It can move at the speed of the learner,” he said.

“This is beyond anything that we’ve seen in the industrial revolution or since with any other new technology. These are adaptive machines that adapt to individuals. They will listen to the voices of the learners, read their faces and study them in the way gifted teachers study their students.

“We’re looking at screens which are listening to the voice of the student and reading the face of the student. Reading and comprehending.”

Courtesy-TheInq

Samsung Releases Bixby In 200 More Countries

August 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

As with new movie releases and smart home electronics, Australia, the UK and other countries seem to be behind in getting new technology offerings packing the US market.

One of the latest is the Bixby voice feature in the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus phones, Bixby being the assistant software similar to Siri or Google Assistant — which itself just arrived in Australia with the Google Home this July.

To install Bixby on your S8 or S8 Plus, press the dedicated Bixby voice key or swipe to Bixby Home and follow the update prompts. There are more than 200 countries now able to do that, including Australia, the UK, Canada, South Africa and more.

Then you’re ready to say, “Hi, Bixby” and begin familiarizing yourself with the features and commands that have been available to South Korean and US users since late July. You can start working on that here.

Qualcomm Goes Deep Learning

August 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Mobile chip maker Qualcomm wants to enable deep learning-based software development on all kinds of devices, and has created the Neural Processing Engine (NPE) for its Snapdragon-series mobile processors.

 The NPE software development kit is now available to all via the Qualcomm Developer Network, which marks the first public release of the SDK, and opens up a lot of potential for AI computing on a range of devices, including mobile phones, in-car platforms and more.

The purpose of the framework is to make possible UX implementations like style transfers and filters (basically what Snapchat and Facebook do with their mobile app cameras) with more accurate applications on user photos, as well as other functions better handled by deep learning algorithms, like scene detection, facial recognition, object tracking and avoidance, as well as natural language processing.

This will mean that anything you’d normally route to powerful cloud servers for advanced processing is done locally on device instead.

Courtesy-Fud

Apple To Unveil Expanded Features For Siri

June 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Apple Inc is expected to unveil plans this week to make its Siri voice assistant work with a larger variety of apps, as the technology company looks to counter the runaway success of Amazon.com Inc’s competing Alexa service.

But the Cupertino, California company is likely to stick to its tested method of focusing on a small amount of features and trying to perfect them, rather than casting as wide a net as possible, according to engineers and artificial intelligence industry insiders.

Currently, Apple’s Siri works with only six types of app: ride-hailing and sharing; messaging and calling; photo search; payments; fitness; and auto infotainment systems. At the company’s annual developer conference next week, it is expected to add to those categories.

Some industry-watchers have also predicted Apple will announce hardware similar to Amazon’s Echo device for the home, which has been a hot-seller recently. Apple declined comment.

But even if Siri doubles its areas of expertise, it will be a far cry from the 12,000 or so tasks that Amazon.com’s Alexa can handle.

The difference illustrates a strategic divide between the two tech rivals. Apple is betting that customers will not use voice commands without an experience similar to speaking with a human, and so it is limiting what Siri can do in order to make sure it works well.

Amazon puts no such restrictions on Alexa, wagering that the voice assistant with the most “skills,” its term for apps on its Echo assistant devices, will gain a loyal following, even if it sometimes makes mistakes and takes more effort to use.

The clash of approaches is coming to a head as virtual assistants that respond to voice commands become a priority for the leading tech companies, which want to find new ways of engaging customers and make more money from shopping and online services.

 

Amazon Launches Bookstore In New York City

May 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Amazon’s will open its newest Amazon Books location, the company’s first in New York, Thursday in the Shops at Columbus Circle, across from Central Park.

“We talk about this as a physical extension of Amazon.com,” said Jennifer Cast, Amazon Books’ vice president, as she showed a few reporters around the store Tuesday. “So you’ll see that we incorporate features that customers love from Amazon.com in various places.”

The 4,000-square-foot space is part of the expanding portfolio of store concepts that Amazon is developing in hopes of cracking into physical retail, with each idea offering its own Amazonian twists. There’s the cashier-less convenience store called Amazon Go; the AmazonFresh Pickup twist on the grocery story, in which you order online and then fetch from the store; and college “bookstores” that don’t store any books.

Amazon is likely hoping to build up its retail presence so it can keep up its massive growth, especially because more than 90 percent of US retail sales still happen in stores. But all this work is coming at a particularly grim time for the broader world of physical retail. At least 10 traditional retailers have filed for bankruptcy protection so far in 2017, and others have announced store closures and layoffs. A major culprit of all this upheaval is Amazon, which convinced more people to shop online. So it’s not without irony that the e-commerce pioneer is now pushing into brick-and-mortar.

“We know that customers like to touch and feel and be in a store, particularly for books. We’ve heard for the past decade that customers want to be able to experiment with our devices and ask questions and try them,” Cast said when asked about Amazon’s new move into physical stores, “and so it just makes sense for us to do this.”

She declined to say whether the stores are profitable but said that the intention is to make money from them, not just to build these spaces as elaborate Amazon billboards.

The Columbus Circle location is Amazon’s seventh bookstore, coming about a year and a half after the first Amazon Books opened in the company’s hometown of Seattle. A total of 13 Amazon Books locations will be open by year’s end, including another Manhattan location on 34th Street, the company said. In comparison, there are about 630 Barnes & Noble bookstores.

Amazon Books’ unique features include a lack of price tags on the shelves. Instead, customers can use the Amazon shopping app on their phones to scan nearby bar codes to find prices, reviews and other information. The company also relies on its wealth of shopping data to create different sections, such as Page Turners, which are books Kindle readers finish in three days or less. There are also only about 3,000 titles in the store, so the only books that make the cut are those that get at least a four-star customer rating or are anticipated new releases.

There’s also a section in the front showing off a bunch of Amazon’s own gadgets, including Fire tablets, Echo smart speakers and Fire TV game controllers.

Amazon is still experimenting with its stores, trying out a bunch of ideas to see what sticks. It should be an uphill battle for the company to outdo incumbents like Macy’s and Target and Barnes & Noble, which have been at this game for a much longer time. But if it finds the right mix of tech and retail, that could spell even more trouble for traditional stores.

Amazon Unveils Echo Show, To Go On Sale In June

May 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Amazon.com Inc has unveiled Echo Show, a touchscreen device that will allow users to make video calls and watch clips from CNN, the latest in the company’s series of popular Echo voice-controlled speakers.

The device, which will go on sale in June for about $230, will feature Alexa, Amazon’s voice-controlled aide, that can be used to play music, order an Uber or turn on the house lights.

Echo Show will allow video conferencing between users having an Echo device or the Alexa app. It is the first to support the feature, which is absent in similar devices offered by rivals such as Alphabet Inc’s unit Google.

“Putting a semi-permanent ambient device in the home that can make and receive video calls is an interesting evolution which should prove compelling,” said Jackdaw Research analyst Jan Dawson.

The launch of the Echo Show is Amazon’s latest effort to make Alexa a key part of its customers’ lives and dominate the nascent voice-powered computing market.

“What we’re seeing is Amazon using its smart original foray into and early dominance of this space as a beachhead to spread into lots of other areas,” Dawson said.

A study by research firm eMarketer showed that Amazon Echo and Echo Dot devices will claim a 70.6 percent share of the U.S. market this year, well ahead of Google Home’s 23.8 percent share.

Amazon unveiled a voice-controlled camera, the Echo Look, last month alongside an app that recommends outfits for users.

The launch comes a day after Microsoft Corp said it was developing a voice-activated speaker in collaboration with Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s unit Harman Kardon.

Will Acer See Growth From Gaming PCs?

March 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

According to a recent report from top executives at Acer, the company expects to experience double-digit growth this year in the gaming PC and low-cost Chromebook markets, with most of the growth being generated from Chromebooks in particular.

The company currently offers the Chromebook CB5 series based on Intel Celeron dual-core chips and 2GB of RAM for $249, the Chromebook 14 series based on Intel Celeron quad-core chips and 4GB of RAM for $259, and the Chromebook CB3 series based on Intel Celeron dual-core chips and 2GB of RAM for $169. Other alternatives include the 11.6-inch Flip Convertible Chromebook based on Intel Celeron dual-core chips ant 4GB of RAM for $249.

Chromebook demand coming from Australia

This category of thin-client, Linux-based laptops is expected to give the company a boost as it takes on competition from ASUS, HP, Dell, Lenovo and others, though it currently manages to hold the most Chromebook product design wins for the year so far.

In particular, Acer says there is an increased demand for Chromebooks from Australia – a sign that the applications for Chromebooks have been expanding, and more markets are starting to show demand for the devices. According to company CEO Jason Chen, the North American market for these thin-client devices is at 30 to 35 percent, while in Europe and Australia it is around 50 percent.

The company also expects shipments of its gaming PCs to increase this year thanks to more stability in component prices over the past few months. In 2016, several market factors combined to have a significant impact on the global supply chain for NAND flash components, small and medium-sized color TFT panels, and premium panels using wide-angle IPS technology.

In other news, the number two executive at Acer’s EMEA regional department, Marco Wang-Adresen, is expected to leave the company after six years, in order to take the same spot at Lenovo at the beginning of next month.

Acer gaming PC products enter US military bases

In addition to the company’s existing online and retail channels, its gaming PC products have also begun to enter retail channels at US military bases worldwide. Over the past decade, the US Army has adopted a variety of games to simulate training environments in an effort to reduce infrastructure costs, lower time on a limited number of ranges, and shoot less ammunition. In 2015, the Army spent more than $27 million on virtual training devices, and the idea is that Acer and others can sell gaming PCs to perform training operations inside tighter timing restraints.

Since last summer, the company has been pushing its non-PC product lines aggressively as well, including its StarVR panoramic virtual reality headset featuring two 5.5-inch displays and a 210-degree field of view. The company also has a partnership with IMAX to establish fifteen VR experience centers worldwide, including two initial centers in Los Angeles and Manchester, UK.

While non-PC product lines account for a smaller portion of the company’s overall sales, it expects to make other devices such as its Windows Mixed Reality headset a priority when the first developer units ship later this month. The company will have several areas of growth to work with this year aside from Chromebooks and gaming PCs, so we can expect stock prices to change as component supplies pick up once again and more units begin shipping worldwide.

Courtesy-Fud

Intel Shows Off Optane SSD

March 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Over the weekend, Intel pushed ahead with the release of its first consumer and enterprise SSD based on 3D XPoint technology, with latency rates roughly one hundred times lower than NAND flash alternatives that have dominated the market since 2007.

The first Optane-branded storage device is called the Optane SSD DC P4800X, which the company says is designed to be used either as high-performance storage or as a caching device in data centers. The card features a capacity of 375GB, with latency of under 10 microseconds (10µs), along with 550,000 random 4K reads, 500,000 random 4K writes, and an overall endurance rating of 12.3 petabytes written (PBW).

3D XPoint memory is about 100 times lower latency than NAND flash, sits right under DRAM (faster), but really puts some pressure on the data center market in terms of access times and endurance ratings. Intel claims that the low latency and high endurance can yield between eight and 40 times faster responses under large workloads, especially for database applications, while consistently outperforming NAND-based technologies.

Originally, the company’s plan was to release 16GB and 32GB Optane storage products under the Intel Optane Memory 8000p series. These units were capable of reaching up to 300,000 random 4K reads and 120,000 random 4K writes, and up to 1,600MB/s sequential reads and 500MB/s sequential writes. The release date for these smaller configurations is currently unknown but are still scheduled for release sometime later this year.

The first noticeable benefit to using Optane as a storage product for enterprise users is the option to significantly upgrade the overall capacity of onboard RAM. For instance, Intel’s dual-socket Xeon systems can support up to 3TB of DRAM but are able to accommodate an additional 24TB of Optane storage. Quad-socket systems, on the other hand, can accommodate 12TB of DRAM and an additional 48TB of Optane storage.

Not cheap – $1,520 at launch, compatible with Kaby Lake

The Intel Optane P4800X 375GB PCI-E add-in card will initially be a very application-specific product for “creative professionals” and enterprise users who need low-latency caching at every point in their systems – from onboard CPU cache, to storage, to DRAM. The other usage model will be for enterprise users who need substantially more memory available to their systems, even at a slightly higher latency cost. The company will initially release the 375GB PCI-E model at $1,520 with limited availability, followed by 375GB and 750GB U.2 models in Q2, and a 1.5TB PCI-E add-in card in the second half of the year.

We expect these modules to be compatible with current Z270 chipsets along with upcoming X299 chipsets due in fall.

Optane DIMMs come next year

This year, Intel is sticking to Optane products in the PCI-Express form factor, but next year plans to make the technology more flexible to performance and enterprise users in the form of individual Optane DIMMs. Pricing and spec options on such modules has yet to be discussed, though the technology available in both formats is expected to significantly boost applications that require large amounts of raw memory consumption.

Courtesy-Fud

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