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Did Kaspersky Hack NSA Staff

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Kaspersky has denied it played a role in hacking into the personal computer of a US National Security Agency (NSA) worker.

Kaspersky Lab has published a report detailing an internal investigation it launched examining allegations that its software was used to compromise an NSA employee’s home computer.

In early October, a report published in the Wall Street Journal claimed that the firm’s software was used to download confidential data from an American agent’s home computer.

However, later reports circulated accusing the firm of deliberately taking files from the PC. Following the incident, Kaspersky conducted a full investigation to gain additional evidence of the incident and explore how it happened.

Researchers at the company confirmed that Russian cybercrooks installed software on an NSA contractor’s computer to access and steal sensitive data.

The user, according to the company, was able to download and install pirated software on the machine. The researchers identified a compromised Microsoft Office ISO file, as well as an illegal Microsoft Office 2013 activation tool.

They were able to install the pirate copy of Office 2013 after disabling the Kaspersky security product. If the latter had been left on the PC, it would have identified the illegal activator tool.

This illegal tool was infected with malware, and this was left on the PC while the Kaspersky software was inactive. The malware meant other third-parties could access the user’s machine, causing major security concerns.

However, when the company’s antivirus software was re-enabled, it detected the software with the verdict Backdoor.Win32.Mokes.hvl and stopped it from contacting a dodgy command and control software.

This backdoor approach was first identified in October 2014, but it’s still being used by cybercriminals looking to steal important data. Kaspersky researchers said the antivirus software detected other variants of the Equation APT malware too.

Various variants of the malware, including a 7zip archive, was sent to the Kaspersky Virus Lab for analysis. Researchers found that it contained a number of source codes and classified documents.

At the request of the firm’s CEO, these files were removed from its servers.

“The reason Kaspersky Lab deleted those files and will delete similar ones in the future is two-fold: first, it needs only malware binaries to improve protection and, secondly, it has concerns regarding the handling of potentially classified material,” the firm wrote.   

“Because of this incident, a new policy was created for all malware analysts: they are now required to delete any potentially classified material that has been accidentally collected during anti-malware research.”

“To further support the objectivity of the internal investigation we ran it using multiple analysts including those of non-Russian origin and working outside of Russia to avoid even potential accusations of influence.”

Speaking about other findings, the firm said: “One of the major early discoveries of the investigation was that the PC in question was infected with the Mokes backdoor – a malware allowing malicious users remote access to a computer.

“As part of the investigation, Kaspersky Lab researchers took a deeper look at this backdoor and other non-Equation threat-related telemetry sent from the computer.

Courtesy-TheInq

Qualcomm Rejects Broadcom’s Takeover Bid

November 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Mobile chipmaker Qualcomm Inc officially rejected rival Broadcom Ltd’s $103-billion takeover bid, saying the offer undervalued the company and would face regulatory hurdles.

Shares of Qualcomm were up 1.8 percent at $65.74 in early afternoon trading, while those of Broadcom were down 0.4 percent at $263.95.

Broadcom said it would seek to engage with Qualcomm’s board and management, adding that it had received positive feedback from key customers and stockholders.

 “We continue to believe our proposal represents the most attractive, value-enhancing alternative available to Qualcomm stockholders and we are encouraged by their reaction,” the company said.

Both companies count Apple among their top customers. Analysts have said a deal between the two would help Qualcomm settle its legal battle with the iPhone maker as Broadcom has a closer relationship with Apple.

Analysts said Broadcom can now raise its bid, go for a proxy fight or launch a hostile exchange offer.

“Qualcomm’s ‘thanks, but no thanks’ response to the unsolicited bid by Broadcom isn’t surprising and we would be surprised if at this point, Broadcom didn’t move forward with a proxy fight,” Loop Capital analyst Betsy Van Hees told Reuters.

US Government Agencies Start To Give Kaspersky The Boot

November 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

US federal government agencies have met the first three deadlines of the September directive calling for the removal of Kaspersky Lab security products from all government systems and networks. 

In September, the US government ordered the removal of all Kaspersky software from federal agencies due to fears of influence from Russian president Vladimir Putin. Agencies were given 90 days to do this.

Following this directive, an official working at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has confirmed that the “vast majority” agencies have removed all Kaspersky software.

Michael Duffy, who leads cybersecurity and communications at the DHS, explained that fewer than half of their agencies were using Kaspersky’s anti-virus software.

He didn’t give a specific percentage about how many agencies have actually met the DHS deadline or how many have been using Kaspersky software but said they’re moving in the right direction.

Kaspersky has faced a lot of pressure from the US government over the past few months amid claims the Kremlin is using its software to conduct cyber espionage.

Of course, Kaspersky has flatly denied these claims, but that hasn’t stopped US officials from making new ones. Duffy spoke to reporters at the 27 October meeting of the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board.

He said the agency won’t comment on any individual cases, but each agency was given an ample timeframe to remove the software. This task is lengthy due to the complex nature of Kaspersky’s products.

There are many other systems that are based on Kaspersky anti-virus and its application programming interface, cautioned Duffy.

While US government agencies work to banish the software, some traces of it will still be left behind, a former DHS official told FCW.

John Norton, who worked at the agency when George W. Bush set it up, said: “Probably the best example is anybody who has a home computer and has tried to remove some kind of app they didn’t want anymore. It’s still in there in some form. It’s difficult to clean that up.”

Responding to the directive in September, a spokesperson for Kaspersky said: “Given that Kaspersky Lab doesn’t have inappropriate ties with any government, the company is disappointed with the decision by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

“No credible evidence has been presented publicly by anyone or any organization as the accusations are based on false allegations and inaccurate assumptions, including claims about the impact of Russian regulations and policies on the company.

“Kaspersky Lab has always acknowledged that it provides appropriate products and services to governments around the world to protect those organizations from cyberthreats, but it does not have unethical ties or affiliations with any government, including Russia.”

Courtesy-TheInq

Can Kaspersky’s Western Business Be Saved

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Eugene Kaspersky, the co-founder of Kaspersky Lab, which is at the center of US government security claims, has revealed further details about plans to have its software examined and audited in an independent code review.

However, the former deputy director of the US National Security Agency (NSA), Rick Ledgett, claims that this is not enough.

Kaspersky Lab said on Monday that it will ask independent parties to review its products in a process starting in the new year. The initiative is part a bid to distance itself from allegations that it allows the Russian government to use its popular anti-virus software to conduct cyber espionage.

The company is planning to provide software regulation and review bodies with the source code of current and future products, working with “the broader information-security community and other stakeholders”, Kaspersky said in a statement.

In addition, the company will also give outside organizations access to other aspects of its business, including software development. These reviews will begin in the first quarter of next year.

It said the aim of this is to “verify the integrity” of its solutions and processes. The company’s products are used on around 400 million computers worldwide.

Kaspersky is calling this a “global transparency initiative”, although it hasn’t yet named the outside reviewers that it will employ. Instead, it said that it is working with parties that sport “strong credentials in software security and assurance testing for cyber-security products”.

Distancing itself from Russia, the company will open specialist centers throughout Asia, Europe and United States. Here, customers, governments and other organizations will be able to access the results of the reviews.

And it’ll expand its independent security research program, paying specialists as much as $100,000 if they find security vulnerabilities in its products.

However, writing today, Ledgett claimed that the initiative won’t address the core problem.

“On the face of it this sounds like a good move, but in reality it doesn’t address the alleged activity,” Ledgett claimed.

He continued: “When you download any anti-virus software and click on the very long end-user license agreement, somewhere in there you agree to give that software access to all the files on your computer and all the files that will be sent to and from your computer…

“This all makes perfect sense for legitimate anti-virus companies, but it’s also a potential gold mine if misused. Instead of looking for signatures of malware, the software can be instructed to look for things like ‘secret’ or ‘confidential’ or ‘proprietary’ – literally anything the vendor desires. Any files of interest can be pulled back to headquarters under the pretext of analyzing potential malware.”

He concluded: “Eugene Kaspersky’s proposal to have experts analyze Kaspersky anti-virus code is irrelevant in this case, because the code is doing exactly what it has been designed to do, but in a way that is inconsistent with what customers expect and are paying for. It’s not the code itself, it’s the use of the code…

“If Eugene Kaspersky really wanted to assuage the fears of customers and potential customers, he would instead have all communications between the company’s servers and the 400 million or so installations on client machines go through an independent monitoring center.

“That way evaluators could see what commands and software updates were going from Kaspersky headquarters to those clients and what was being sent back in response.”

Just last month, the use of Kaspersky products was banned throughout US government agencies amid fears that the company has been working with the Kremlin.

Despite this, the company has denied any involvement with the Russian government, adding that it doesn’t work with any governments in order to engage in espionage.

Co-founder Eugene Kaspersky said: “Internet balkanization benefits no one except cybercriminals. Reduced cooperation among countries helps the bad guys in their operations, and public-private partnerships don’t work like they should.

“We need to re-establish trust in relationships between companies, governments and citizens. That’s why we’re launching this Global Transparency Initiative: we want to show how we’re completely open and transparent.

He added that the company is ethical in its practices. “We’ve nothing to hide. And I believe that with these actions we’ll be able to overcome mistrust and support our commitment to protecting people in any country on our planet.” 

Courtesy-TheInq

Does Kaspersky Have Ties To The Russian Government

August 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

The Untouchables are briefing private sector companies on intelligence claiming to show that the Moscow-based cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab is an unacceptable threat to national security.

Apparently the FBI’s goal is to have US firms push Kaspersky out of their systems as soon as possible or refrain from using them in new products or other efforts, the current and former officials say.

The FBI’s counterintelligence section has been giving briefings since beginning of the year on a priority basis, prioritising companies in the energy sector and those that use industrial control (ICS) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

The FBI has focused on this sector following the cyber attacks on the Ukraine power grid which were believed to be a test run by Russian spooks. However the move also comes as Russia is engaged in its own push to stamp American tech giants like Microsoft out of that country’s systems. Rather than being security issues, it is also possible that it is a form of tit-for-tat trade war.

However  Businessweek claims to have seen emails which “show that Kaspersky Lab has maintained a much closer working relationship with Russia’s main intelligence agency, the FSB, than it has publicly admitted”.

Kaspersky Lab says that the company does not have “inappropriate” ties with any government, adding that “the company does regularly work with governments and law enforcement agencies around the world with the sole purpose of fighting cybercrime”.

Courtesy-Fud

Western Digital To Raise Bid Offer For Toshiba’s Chip Business

June 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Western Digital Corp will increase its offer for Toshiba Corp’s prized semiconductor unit to $18 billion or more, a person familiar with the matter said, in a last-ditch effort to clinch a deal both companies consider vital.

The U.S. chipmaker is part of a consortium led by a Japanese government-backed fund. The group will present the new offer of 2 trillion yen or more by Thursday, when the struggling Japanese conglomerate is due to choose a preferred bidder for its Toshiba Memory Corp unit, the world’s second-largest producer of NAND memory chips, the person told Reuters on Saturday.

Toshiba has been favoring a rival bid from U.S. chipmaker Broadcom Ltd, which has partnered with U.S. private equity firm Silver Lake to offer 2.2 trillion yen, people familiar with the matter have told Reuters.

A spokesman for Western Digital had no comment. Toshiba could not immediately be reached for comment.

Toshiba had set a 2 trillion yen threshold for the sale as it rushes to find a buyer to cover billions of dollars in cost overruns at its now-bankrupt U.S. nuclear business Westinghouse Electric Corp.

The offer by Western Digital, a long-time partner of the laptops-to-nuclear conglomerate’s lucrative chips division, comes as uncertainty about the make-up of the groups bidding for Toshiba’s crown jewel has increased.

Western Digital has been seen by some sources as crucial to successful deal, as it jointly operates a key flash-memory chip plant with Toshiba in western Japan.

Delphi Automotive To Offer On-Demand Self-driving Shuttle Service

June 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Delphi Automotive PLC plans on joining forces with Paris-based Transdev Group, a public transport service controlled by the French government, to develop an automated on-demand shuttle service in Europe, according to announcements made by both companies.

It is the latest in a growing web of global alliances aimed at putting self-driving vehicles on the road over the next four years.

In a joint statement, Delphi and Transdev will test driverless vehicles in Normandy and outside Paris, in advance of building a commercial service that could be deployed in other markets.

The Delphi-Transdev partnership will provide “a clear path to commercializing automated mobility on demand,” said Glen De Vos, Delphi’s chief technology officer, in a media briefing.

Delphi is contributing a self-driving system that it has been developing with Israeli mapping and vision expert Mobileye NV, which is being acquired by U.S. chipmaker Intel Corp.

Transdev will provide dispatch, routing and remote control-command services, the companies’ statement said.

Delphi has been building its expertise and capability in self-driving vehicles through partnerships, investments and acquisitions.

Several of its affiliates will participate in the project with Transdev, including Ottomatika (vehicle control software), Control-Tec (real-time data analytics) and Movimento (over-the-air software updates).

In May, German automaker BMW AG announced that Delphi will join a self-driving partnership that includes Intel and Mobileye.

Transdev is a mobility services provider that is controlled by Caisse des Depots, an investment arm of the French government. Veolia Environnement SA, the French waste management company, holds a 30-percent stake.

Transdev operates public and private transport services in 19 countries.

Earlier this year, it formed a research partnership with Renault SA and Nissan Motor Co to develop a driverless system for public transport and on-demand use.

IBM & Samsung Developing ‘Nanosheets’ To Shrink Processors, Expand Performance

June 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

If you’re disappointed that your smartwatch isn’t that smart or your mobile phone lacks sufficient power, IBM and Samsung have some good news for you.

The allies have announced a technology they call nanosheets that should help shrink chip electronics by another notch, a move that’s necessary to squeeze more computing power into a smaller processor. Compared with today’s chips, they expect a 40 percent performance boost at the same level of power consumption or, alternatively, the same performance but using only a quarter the power.

The development is important, as chipmakers for decades have driven progress in the technology industry, with miniaturization that enabled first personal computers and then powerful phones. But it’s been hard to maintain the rate of progress, charted by Moore’s Law, that for years meant a steady doubling every two years of the number of tiny switches called transistors that would fit on a chip. Even chipmaking powerhouse Intel, whose co-founder Gordon Moore came up with Moore’s Law, has slowed down its cadence.

Today’s chips are built with transistors whose dimensions measure 10 nanometers, which means about 1,000 fit end-to-end across the diameter of a human hair. The next generation will shrink that dimension to 7nm, and the IBM-Samsung development goes one generation beyond that to 5nm.

That means transistors can be packed four times as densely on a chip compared with today’s technology. All that circuitry can help computing jobs like combining multiple photos into a single panorama, recognizing a voice command or stabilizing shaky videos.

“A nanosheet-based 5nm chip will deliver performance and power, together with density,” said Huiming Bu, IBM’s director of silicon integration and device research.

Take all those numbers with a nanograin of salt, though, because chipmakers no longer agree on what exactly they’re measuring about transistors. And there’s also a long road between this research announcement and actual commercial manufacturing. IBM believes this new process won’t cost any more than chips with today’s transistor designs, but its approach requires an expensive shift that chipmakers have put off for years: the use of extreme ultraviolet light to etch chip features onto silicon wafers.

The IBM research alliance with Samsung and chipmaker GlobalFoundries disclosed the development Monday at a Japanese processor conference.

Intel Shows Off Optane SSD

March 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Computing

Over the weekend, Intel pushed ahead with the release of its first consumer and enterprise SSD based on 3D XPoint technology, with latency rates roughly one hundred times lower than NAND flash alternatives that have dominated the market since 2007.

The first Optane-branded storage device is called the Optane SSD DC P4800X, which the company says is designed to be used either as high-performance storage or as a caching device in data centers. The card features a capacity of 375GB, with latency of under 10 microseconds (10µs), along with 550,000 random 4K reads, 500,000 random 4K writes, and an overall endurance rating of 12.3 petabytes written (PBW).

3D XPoint memory is about 100 times lower latency than NAND flash, sits right under DRAM (faster), but really puts some pressure on the data center market in terms of access times and endurance ratings. Intel claims that the low latency and high endurance can yield between eight and 40 times faster responses under large workloads, especially for database applications, while consistently outperforming NAND-based technologies.

Originally, the company’s plan was to release 16GB and 32GB Optane storage products under the Intel Optane Memory 8000p series. These units were capable of reaching up to 300,000 random 4K reads and 120,000 random 4K writes, and up to 1,600MB/s sequential reads and 500MB/s sequential writes. The release date for these smaller configurations is currently unknown but are still scheduled for release sometime later this year.

The first noticeable benefit to using Optane as a storage product for enterprise users is the option to significantly upgrade the overall capacity of onboard RAM. For instance, Intel’s dual-socket Xeon systems can support up to 3TB of DRAM but are able to accommodate an additional 24TB of Optane storage. Quad-socket systems, on the other hand, can accommodate 12TB of DRAM and an additional 48TB of Optane storage.

Not cheap – $1,520 at launch, compatible with Kaby Lake

The Intel Optane P4800X 375GB PCI-E add-in card will initially be a very application-specific product for “creative professionals” and enterprise users who need low-latency caching at every point in their systems – from onboard CPU cache, to storage, to DRAM. The other usage model will be for enterprise users who need substantially more memory available to their systems, even at a slightly higher latency cost. The company will initially release the 375GB PCI-E model at $1,520 with limited availability, followed by 375GB and 750GB U.2 models in Q2, and a 1.5TB PCI-E add-in card in the second half of the year.

We expect these modules to be compatible with current Z270 chipsets along with upcoming X299 chipsets due in fall.

Optane DIMMs come next year

This year, Intel is sticking to Optane products in the PCI-Express form factor, but next year plans to make the technology more flexible to performance and enterprise users in the form of individual Optane DIMMs. Pricing and spec options on such modules has yet to be discussed, though the technology available in both formats is expected to significantly boost applications that require large amounts of raw memory consumption.

Courtesy-Fud

Will Cars Go Intel Inside?

January 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Intel has decided to spend a heap of money it’s got by buying into a company called HERE, or Here as we call it.

The chip giant has only taken a 15 percent share into Here, at a price that no doubt it can afford.

Here specializes in digital maps and location services for the internet of things as well as autonomous – that is to say, self-driving vehicles. Here is a private company, so Intel doesn’t have to say what a 15 percent share means in terms of cash.

But the interesting thing is that the company is “indirectly” wholly owned by Audi, BMW, and Daimler.

It’s not indirectly “wholly owned” now, though.

It means that Intel is in cahoots with motorcar companies and that’s not really a surprise. It has to go somewhere, perhaps autonomously, where no motorcar or semiconductor company has gone before.

Courtesy-Fud

Microsoft, Intel Working On ‘Far-field Speech Recognition’ For Cortana

December 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

cortana-and-intel-150x150Intel and Microsoft are currently fine tuning the technology that allows you to shout out commands to Cortana or activate a Windows 10 PC from sleep mode without being all that close to it.

The chipmaker is working with Microsoft to add “far-field speech recognition” technology, where the user can shout out Cortana commands to a Windows PC from longer distances.

“Soon, you’ll be able to speak to your PC from a distance and access all of your information on the device and in the cloud,” said Navin Shenoy, senior vice president and general manager for the Client Computing Group for Intel, in a blog entry this week.

The range isn’t available yet.

Users also will be able to use Cortana to start a PC from standby. Users will have to say, “Hey Cortana.”

For now, Cortana works best if the user is close to the PC. This development is more in the vein of Amazon Echo, which can recognize commands from a distance.

The ability to shout commands to Cortana from a longer distance also has Amazon Echo-like benefits. Users will be able to tell a PC to play music or ask about the weather. The feature will be even more useful when Microsoft completes a plan to make Windows 10 PCs hubs for smart homes, with users being able to use Cortana to operate electrical appliances.

That’s just one of many developments Intel is planning for PCs. Intel is working with Microsoft on its wire-free PC initiative, with a high-speed WiGig wireless connection being used to connect PCs to peripherals. Intel also said it would bring its Optane premium memory to PCs by the end of 2017.

Intel is also aggressively pushing for LTE receivers to be installed in laptops and hybrid tablet devices, with the ultimate goal to bring 5G to all devices. The new 5G deployments are expected by 2020 and could bring new forms of long and short-distance communications to devices. Intel is developing modems for 5G connectivity.

Intel Makes A Score With Delphi Automotive

December 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

Intel has signed a deal with Auto parts maker Delphi Automotive Plc and Israeli technology firm Mobileye.

The move will put Intel chips under the bonnet of their joint effort to produce self-driving vehicles by 2019.

Intel is also working with German luxury car maker BMW AG and Mobileye on self-driving technology. However so far, the chip maker has not made much of a dent in the autonomous vehicle market.

Glen De Vos, Delphi’s vice president of engineering announced that Intel will provide a “system on chip” for autonomous vehicle systems that Delphi and Mobileye are developing together.

UK-based Delphi is talking with established automakers and new or niche vehicle companies, such as manufacturers of commercial vehicles, interested in automating vehicles, De Vos said.

The system Delphi and Mobileye are developing would likely come to market first in a commercial vehicle operating in a limited area, such as an airport shuttle or a ride-hailing service, DeVos said.

Delphi is testing its autonomous driving technology in vehicles in Singapore. By the end of this year, Delphi hopes to choose a city in the United States to launch a test fleet of self-driving cars during 2017, De Vos said. The company is also looking for test site in a European city.

Courtesy-Fud

Is Intel Going After Qualcomm In The Auto Space?

November 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Although Intel is not big in the car industry at the moment and Qualcomm, with its NXP takeover, is King – it appears that there is a war brewing between the pair.

Intel has been preparing in recent months for an entry into tthe weird and wonderful world autonomous driving.

According to EE Times, Ken Caviasca, Intel’s vice president and general manager said his outfit had shedloads of tech ready and more leg room to scale its business than Qualcomm/NXP.

Kathy Winter, Intel vice president and general manager of Automated Driving Solutions, said Intel wants to lead in all three facets of the highly automated vehicle platform: In-vehicle computing, connectivity and data center. Intel is setting its sights high on an “end-to-end” play in the auto industry.

Qualcomm on the other hand wants to buy its way into the market but Intel us acquiring smaller companies whose technologies are diverse but deemed essential to the future of connected and highly automated vehicles.

Intel is pinning its hopes on an important hire – Kathy Winter. She served as vice president, software & services, automated driving at Delphi Electronics & Safety before becoming an Intel minion in August.
Winter organised the Delphi cross-country autonomous drive in an Audi Q5 outfitted with Delphi self-driving technology in 2015. This was touted as the first and longest drive by an autonomous vehicle in the United States, covering 3,400 miles, 99% of the time in self-driving mode.

Caviasca said, “Kathy can help us go faster” which makes her the equivalent of putting on spoilers and two red lines down the side of the vehicle to speed it up.

Courtesy-Fud

IBM, Partners To Take On Intel With Introduction Of OpenCAPI

October 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Computing

ibm-opencapi-150x150Technology heavyweights IBM Corp, Google and seven others have teamed up to launch an open specification that can boost data center server performance by up to ten times, to take on Intel Corp.

The new standard, called Open Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface (OpenCAPI), is an open forum to provide a high bandwidth, low latency open interface design specification.

The open interface will help corporate and cloud data centers to speed up big data, machine learning, analytics and other emerging workloads.

The consortium plans to make the OpenCAPI specification available to the public before the end of the year and expects servers and related products based on the new standard in the second half of 2017, it said in a statement.

Intel, the world’s largest chipmaker, is known to protect its server technologies and has chosen to sit out of the new consortium. In the past also, it had stayed away from prominent open standards technology groups such as CCIX and Gen-Z.

“As artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced analytics become the price of doing business in today’s digital era, huge volumes of data are now the norm,” Doug Balog, general manager for IBM Power, told Reuters.

“It’s clear that today’s data centers can no longer rely on one company alone to drive innovation,” Balog said.

Advanced Micro Devices Inc, Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co, Mellanox Technologies Ltd, Micron Technology Inc, NVIDIA Corp and Xilinx Inc are also members of the OpenCAPI consortium.

 

Nvidia Unveils AI Computer System For Self-driving Cars

September 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

nvidia-150x150U.S. chipmaker Nvidia Corp has unveiled a smaller and more efficient artificial intelligence computer for self-driving cars, saying it would power Baidu’s mapping and autonomous vehicle technology.

Chinese web services company Baidu will deploy Nvidia’s new Drive PX 2 as its in-vehicle car computer for its self-driving system, Nvidia said in a press release as‮ ‬it‮ ‬unveiled the computer at the GPU Technology Conference in Beijing.

As more carmakers develop plans for self-driving technology to roll out in their vehicles in the next decade or less, Nvidia is trying to lower the barriers to entry, providing powerful computers to help automakers enter the market.

Earlier this month, Nvidia and Baidu announced a partnership to develop a full self-driving car architecture from the cloud to the vehicle using both companies’ expertise in artificial intelligence (AI).

Nvidia said its new Drive PX 2 computer uses 10 watts of power and is half the size of the original version, launched in January. That solves a problem faced by carmakers incorporating self-driving technology – how to pack the punch of AI, which helps cars make decisions, into a compact computer suitable for production-ready vehicles.

Configured with a single processor, the Drive PX 2 fuses incoming data from sensors and uses deep neural networks to produce a complex picture of objects around a vehicle.

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