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Tesla Ends Free Charging For New Vehicles

January 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Around The Net

It will now cost new Tesla owners about $15 to complete the trip from Los Angeles to San Francisco when using the company’s Supercharging stations.

The new pricing applies only to owners who purchase their electric vehicles after this Sunday. Those who bought vehicles before Jan. 15 will continue to receive free charging, the company said.

The company this week announced that its charging costs will vary from state to state and depend on which charging “tier” a driver is using. Tier 1 pricing, which applies to cars charging at or below 60 kW per minute, will cost half as much as cars using Tier 2 charging, which applies to cars charging above 60 kW per minute. In New York, Tier 2 charging will cost 20 cents a minute and in California, it will cost 19 cents.

Cars using fast charging or Tier 2 charging can attain about a half a full vehicle charge in 30 minutes — enough to travel up to 170 miles.

Tesla announced both kilowatt hour and by-minute pricing for its Supercharger stations, and said a road trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles (about 380 miles) would cost about $15. (A cross-country trip from Los Angeles to New York — about 2,800 miles — would run around $120 in charging fees.)

Tier 1 pricing also applies anytime your vehicle is sharing Supercharger power with another car. Supercharger pricing information can be viewed on the vehicle’s 17-in. touchscreen.

Tesla Model S and Model X cars ordered after Jan. 15 will receive 400 kWh (kilowatt-hour) of free Supercharging credits (roughly 1,000 miles) annually on the anniversary of their delivery.

“We carefully considered current Supercharger usage and found that 400 kWh covers the annual long-distance driving needs of the majority of our owners,” Tesla said in a blog. The company didn’t mention whether buyers of the Model 3 EV, due out in mid-2018, would also receive an annual free charging credit.

The Model 3 will be Tesla’s most affordable EV, with a starting price of about $35,000, and was originally slated to ship at the end of this year. Preorders for it have topped 400,000.

In North America, Tesla Supercharging pricing is fixed within each state or province. Internationally, pricing is fixed within each country, Tesla said.

When fully charged, the 85 kWh Model S sedan has a range of just over 300 miles, depending on road conditions and the speed at which it’s driven, according to Tesla.

“Where possible, owners are billed per kWh (kilowatt-hour), which is the most fair and simple method. In other areas, we bill for the service per minute,” the company explained on its website.

The fees for charging could provide Tesla with as much as $175 million in revenue just in this first year, according to Trip Chowdhry, managing director of equity research for Global Equities Research.

Panasonic Develops Flexible Lithium Ion Battery

January 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

Panasonic has previewed a flexible lithium ion battery fit for use in wearable devices that maintains its electrical characteristics even after repeated bending.

The battery means more freedom for designers of wearable devices, who are constrained by the need for inflexible areas to hold the battery and some electronics.

Three prototypes of the battery were on display at this week’s CES electronics show in Las Vegas. The largest is 40mm by 65mm, the medium size is 35mm by 55mm, and the smallest is 28.5mm by 39mm.

All three are just 0.45mm thick, considerably thinner than a credit card, which is 0.76mm thick. They can be bent up to a radius of 25mm or twisted to an angle of 25 degrees.

The batteries weigh just a gram or two and output 3.8 volts.

The batteries are small enough to be embedded inside credit cards or similar sized card systems. Batteries currently used in such cards degrade faster than normal because of the flexing and twisting they experience from being in a wallet.

The new batteries, which are still under development, don’t suffer from the same problems. Flexing up to the 25mm limit results in a loss of just 1 percent of capacity.

Panasonic is one of the world’s largest lithium ion battery makers. It produces cells for numerous applications, from consumer AA cells to the batteries used in electric cars. The company is in a high-profile partnership with Tesla to supply batteries for its cars from the custom built Gigafactory in Nevada.

Samsung Puts Confidence In Galaxy S8, Sets 10M Production Target

January 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Mobile

Samsung Electronics Co Ltd has set an early production target of 10 million Galaxy S8 smartphones, South Korea’s Electronic Times reported on Thursday, citing unnamed sources.

Samsung is counting on the S8 to rejuvenate sales after it scrapped the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones last year in one of the biggest product safety failures in tech history.

The firm has yet to disclose what caused some Note 7 phones to catch fire on their own.

 The newspaper said the world’s top smartphone maker would start production in March and planned to start selling them in April. Galaxy S7 phones went on sale in March last year.

Nokia Strikes Back At Apple With Latest Patent Lawsuits

December 23, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

nokia-hq-150x150Nokia Corp said it has filed a number of lawsuits against Apple Inc for violating 32 technology patents, striking back at the iPhone maker’s legal action targeting the one-time cellphone industry leader a day earlier.

Nokia’s lawsuits, filed in courts in Dusseldorf, Mannheim and Munich, Germany, and the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, cover patents for displays, user interfaces, software, antennas, chipsets and video coding.

“Since agreeing a license covering some patents from the Nokia Technologies portfolio in 2011, Apple has declined subsequent offers made by Nokia to license other of its patented inventions which are used by many of Apple’s products,” Nokia said in a statement.

 Apple on Tuesday had taken legal action against Acacia Research Corp  and Conversant Intellectual Property Management Inc, accusing them of colluding with Nokia to extract and extort exorbitant revenues unfairly from Apple.

“We’ve always been willing to pay a fair price to secure the rights of patents covering technology in our products,” said Apple spokesman Josh Rosenstock. “Unfortunately, Nokia has refused to license their patents on a fair basis and is now using the tactics of a patent troll to attempt to extort money from Apple by applying a royalty rate to Apple’s own inventions they had nothing to do with.”

Acacia and Conversant did not immediately respond to requests for comment, and Nokia was not immediately available to comment on the Apple lawsuit.

The legal action by Nokia and Apple appear to mark a revival of the “smartphone patent wars” that began five years ago, when Apple filed a series of patent infringement cases against Samsung Electronics  around the world, with wins and losses on both sides.

Apple’s lawsuit against Acacia, Conversant and Nokia was filed only one day after Ottawa-based Conversant named Boris Teksler as its new chief executive. He had worked as Apple’s director of patent licensing and strategy from 2009 to 2013, the latter half of his tenure overlapping with the lawsuits against Samsung.

Acacia is a publicly traded patent licensing firm based in Newport Beach, California. One of its subsidiaries sued Apple for patent infringement and was awarded $22 million by a Texas jury in September.

Similarly, Conversant, which claims to own thousands of patents, announced last week that a Silicon Valley jury had awarded one of its units a $7.3 million settlement in an infringement case against Apple involving two smartphone patents.

Nokia, once the world’s dominant cellphone maker, missed out on the transition to smartphones triggered by Apple’s introduction of the iPhone in 2007.

Michigan State Univ Develops Body Motion Power Generator

December 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

nanogenerator-1-150x150Can’t wait for the day when you don’t have to worry about carrying a charger for your cell phone or wearable device?

That day might not be as far away as you think.

Researchers at Michigan State University have developed a device they’ve dubbed a nanogenerator that lets motion charge a mobile device or a wearable.

A cell phone using this technology, for instance, would need no battery. Your own motion would provide power.

 “What I foresee, relatively soon, is the capability of not having to charge your cell phone for an entire week, for example, because that energy will be produced by your movement,” said Nelson Sepulveda, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan State University, in a written statement. “We’re on the path toward wearable devices powered by human motion.”
It’s not clear how soon the device would be ready for actual production.

According to the university, the nanogenerator is built with a silicone wafer that is then layered with films made of silver, polyimide and polypropylene ferroelectret. Then ions are added so each layer of the device has charged particles.

When the device is subjected to motion, it creates electrical energy.

The nanogenerator, which is as thin as a sheet of paper, is adaptable to different sizes and applications. Researchers have been able to use it to power an LCD touch screen, a bank of 20 LED lights and a flexible keyboard.

The device used to power the LED lights was palm-sized, for example, while the one used to power the touch screen was as small as a finger, according to the university.

Scientists said the device becomes more powerful if it’s folded.

“Each time you fold it, you are increasing exponentially the amount of voltage you are creating,” Sepulveda said in the statement. “You can start with a large device, but when you fold it once, and again, and again, it’s now much smaller and has more energy. Now it may be small enough to put in a specially made heel of your shoe so it creates power each time your heel strikes the ground.”

That energy could then be transferred from the shoe to a headset.

The device, which is still be studied, is lightweight, flexible, relatively inexpensive and scalable, the university said.

Samsung Still Facing Challenges Recovering Galaxy Note 7 Phones

December 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

galaxy-note-7-recall-150x150Samsung’s recall of Galaxy Note7 smartphones because of exploding batteries remains a challenging task, and some users, for example, in Canada, are still not exchanging their devices for a refund or a different phone.

The South Korean company has decided to cut these phones from the network, adopting similar measures to those taken last month in New Zealand and earlier this month in Australia.

The company said Wednesday that starting Dec. 12, functional limitations on Note7 phones, including curbs on the battery charge, and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth disablement will be introduced in Canada.

From Dec. 15, customers still using the Note7 will no longer be able to connect to any Canadian mobile network service to make calls, use data or send text messages. Samsung said it had been able to secure nearly 90 percent of the Note7 devices that were brought into the Canadian market.

When Samsung announced in September a recall of the Note7 in tandem with Health Canada, a Canadian federal government department, it was said that about 22,000 of the recalled smartphones were sold in the country.

Samsung announced a global recall of the Note7 in early September after it found a “battery cell issue.” The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission on Sept. 15 announced a recall in the U.S. of about 1 million Note7 phones as it found that the lithium-ion batteries in the devices could overheat and catch fire. By Oct. 13, the CPSC expanded the recall to include replacement Note7 phones that Samsung had supplied to customers under the first recall as they too were found to have the battery problem.

The company also stopped production of the phones. It has yet to explain in detail what caused the batteries to explode. A recent report suggested that the phone design could compress the battery even during normal operation.

Samsung said on Dec. 1 that it was working with local carriers to disconnect from Dec. 15 Note7 phones that were still being used by customers in Australia. Note7 owners in the country responded well to the recall, but a small number of affected devices are still with them, the company said. Customers in New Zealand were to be disconnected from Nov. 18.

The Note7 recall has been both a public relations and financial debacle for Samsung. The company has reported that the third quarter revenue of its IT and Mobile Communications division was down 15 percent from the same period last year to 22.5 trillion Korean won (US$19.8 billion) while operating profit fell 95 percent to 100 billion won, as a result of the discontinuation of the Galaxy Note7.

BMW To Launch New Version Of i3 Electric Car Next Year

November 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

bmw-i3-150x150German luxury automobile maker BMW plans to roll out a new version of its i3 electric car next year with a longer range and revamped design, German weekly Welt am Sonntag reported, citing company sources.

BMW will rework the front and rear of the i3 and equip the car with a new battery to increase its range substantially beyond the current 300 km maximum, the paper said, adding that the increase would be below 50 percent.

BMW has been torn about whether to accelerate development of new electric cars given its expensive early investment has only resulted in lackluster sales, with 25,000 i3s delivered last year.

 To help improve sales, BMW has already increased the battery range of its i3 city car by 50 percent this year.

BMW was not immediately available for comment on the newspaper report.

 

In Spite Of The Note 7 Disaster Samsung Still Number 1

November 25, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

Samsung Electronics is still the number one global seller of smartphones in spite of the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco.

According to bean counters at the Gartner Group, Samsung sold over 71 million smartphones in the July-September period worldwide, accounting for 19.2 percent of the market.

It did lose market share (23.6 percent) from a year before and sales dropped 14.2 percent year-on-year. It is the company’s worst performance since its 12.3 percent drop in smartphone sales in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Gartner research director Anshul Gupta said:

“The decision to withdraw the Galaxy Note 7 was correct, but the damage to Samsung’s brand will make it harder for the company to increase its smartphone sales in the short term. For Samsung, it is crucial that the Galaxy S8 launches successfully, so partners and customers regain trust in its brand.”

However Apple did not benefit from Samsung’s hardships and its iPhone 7 did not pick up extra sales. Despite the launch of its iPhone 7 Plus, Apple sold 43 million smartphones, a 6.6 percent drop year-on-year.

Its market share declined from 13 percent to 11.5 percent, the lowest since the first quarter of 2009. The company’s sales fell by 8.5 percent in the U.S. and by 31 percent in China.

Gartner research director Roberta Cozza said that the withdrawal of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 may benefit sales of Apple’s iPhone 7 Plus only slightly, as Note 7 users are likely to stay with Samsung or at least with Android.

Google’s Android has captured market shares from Apple’s iOS, dominating nearly 88 percent of the total market in the smartphone operating system market.
The winners have been Chinese smartphone vendors posted significant growth, closing the gap with them.

Three Chinese vendors ? Huawei, Oppo and BBK Communication Equipment ? combined to carve out 21 percent of the global smartphone market. The trio reached 32 million, 24 million and 19 million orders, respectively.

Gartner said only the three among the global top five increased their sales and market shares during the quarter.

Meanwhile, global sales of smartphones tallied 373 million units in the third quarter this year, a 5.4 percent rise from a year earlier, according to Gartner.

Courtesy-Fud

Will The iPhone 8 Go OLED?

November 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

Hopes that Apple might sex up its iPhone 8 with OLED technology could be dashed by the fact that its suppliers can’t make enough of the technology.

After producing an iPhone 7 which was more or less the same as the last one, Apple had been expected to do something special with the iPhone 8. OLED screens were being touted as a way that the tax-dodging cargo cult might pull that off.

However according to the IB Times  suppliers may not be able to meet the demand.

This could force Apple to release limited next-gen iPhone units in 2017 with the rest using the older LCD technology. In other words it will be regurgitating the same technology it has used for years meaning that the iPhone 8 will look and feel like the iPhone 7, which looked suspiciously like the iPhone 6, which was not much of an advance from the iPhone 5.

Samsung Display, LG Display, Sharp and Japan Display cannot mass produce enough units as demanded by the smartphone industry. OLED screens are difficult and time-consuming to produce and it is likely that this constraint will spill over to 2018.

Samsung is reported to be the chief supplier for iPhone’s OLED panels in 2017 but it is facing low yield rates along with its high demand. Apple ordered an initial round of 100 million units for 2017 but Samsung is likely to produce only a portion of that.

KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said that Apple may resort to releasing a fair amount of units featuring screens that use older LCD technology.

Courtesy-Fud

China Asks Apple To Investigate Mysterious iPhone 6 Shutdowns

November 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Mobile

 

iphone-6-150x150A consumer protection group in China has made a request to Apple to investigate an issue with iPhone 6 and iPhone 6S units that are automatically shutting off.

Recently, iPhone customers in the country have complained about the problem to the China Consumers Association, the group said in a statement on Tuesday. The shutdowns occur when the phone’s battery charge drops to between 60 and 50 percent.

The problem will persist despite upgrading to the latest version of iOS. It will also occur in both cold environments and at room temperature.  After the automatic shutdown, the phones will also fail to turn on without connecting to a power supply.

A “considerable number” of consumers have contacted the China Consumers Association, and many have the same problem, the group said. It made the statement as the local press in the country have written stories about the shutdowns.

Apple hasn’t publicly commented on the matter.

Prior to Tuesday’s statement from the consumer association, affected iPhone users in the country also took to local social media services to express their complaints.

“When the battery is at 60 percent it shuts down,” wrote one user on Sina Weibo. “On restart, the phone will display no battery. Then when I turn it on again, it will be normal, only to automatically shut down again.”

Local Chinese media have posted the letter the China Consumers Association sent to Apple. It asks that the company reply within 10 days.

The association is asking Apple what the problem is, whether the phone’s battery is responsible, and what steps the company will take to address the issue.

Do Electric Cars Need To Make A Noise?

November 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

Beginning in the year 2019, all newly manufactured hybrid and light-duty electric cars will be required to make noise when they are traveling at low speeds so pedestrians can better hear and avoid them. That’s in the United States.

The change of rules comes from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which announced on Monday for a second time that it will require the audible alert when traveling at speeds below 18.6 miles per hour (29.9km/h) to help prevent roughly 2,400 pedestrian injuries per year. The requirement will apply to all hybrid and “electric light vehicles with four wheels” and a “gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less.”

The requirement was originally required by the Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Act of 2010, and was proposed by the NHTSA to the public in early 2013 to be ratified the following year, but was ultimately delayed until March 2016. Now, it has been delayed another three years to allow all hybrid and fully-electric vehicle manufacturers to comply with the standards.

Automakers to install external waterproof speakers in EVs and HEVs

Manufacturers of these vehicles now have until September 1, 2019 to meet the requirement, which means that any consumer who buys a hybrid or light-duty EV after this date will be sacrificing the fascinating whisper-quiet sensation of operating a hybrid or all-electric vehicle at lower speeds in order to ensure pedestrian safety and compliance with a five-year delayed mandate. For most companies, this will be done by installing small, external waterproof speakers somewhere outside of each vehicle at an estimated cost of around $23 million in the first year.

Back in 2009 and 2011, the NHTSA published two studies showing the incidence rates of pedestrian and bicyclist crashes between hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. While the tests were done in a variety of road and weather conditions, the charts show that crashes in both types of cars mostly occur in zones with low speed limits, while they are twice as likely to occur among HEVs when backing up, slowing or stopping, or entering and leaving parking spaces.

The first report shows the number of pedestrian crashes at potential low-speed maneuvers between the two types of engine types, given a sample size of just over half a million cars (8,387 HEVs and 559,703 ICE vehicles). Based on the results, HEVs accounted for 1.2 percent of all low-speed crashes while regular gas-powered cars accounted for 0.6 percent.

The second report is an update on the first one and shows the typical odds for hybrid electric versus internal combustion engine crashes involving pedestrians and bicyclists. Based on a case-control study combining about 1.03 million HEVs and traditional cars, the chart shows the pedestrian crash rate for HEVs at 0.77 percent, while gas-powered cars were at 0.57 percent. Meanwhile, the bicyclist crash rate for HEVs was 0.48 percent while gas-powered cars were at 0.30 percent.

“This is a common-sense tool to help pedestrians — especially folks who are blind or have low vision — make their way safely,” said NHTSA Administrator Dr. Mark Rosekind. “With pedestrian fatalities on the rise, it is vitally important we take every action to protect the most vulnerable road users.”

The studies are not new, and Honda was aware of the concern as early as 1994 when it filed a patent for a simulated EV noise generator to let drivers and nearby pedestrians know the operating conditions of a vehicle.

Of course, not all manufacturers have been willing to comply and “some OEMs aren’t doing anything until they know what the federal law says,” says Chris Duke, host of auto improvement show Motorz. Ford is one of several car makers not yet adding warning sounds to its EVs and plug-in hybrids, including its “deep space silent” Focus Electric.

Another example is Tesla. In its March 2011 earnings report, the company acknowledged the NHTSA’s minimum standards but said the requirement to alter the design of its vehicles could “negatively impact consumer interest in [its] vehicles.” While current Model S and Model X sedans still do not emit noise at low speeds, some customers have already signaled interest in having them available for the safety of nearby pedestrians.

Of course, when driving at speeds above 35 miles per hour, wind and tire noise are more likely to be louder to nearby pedestrians and bicyclists than engine noise, so the real concern here is low-speed maneuvers. At any rate, the importance of small audible details should become more noticeable to consumers as self-driving vehicles begin emerging onto the market over the next few years.

Courtesy-Fud

Tesla Aims To Speed Up Electric Car Production With Latest Acquisition

November 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

tesla-motors-logo-150x150Electric vehicle maker Tesla Motors Inc has agreed to acquire Germany’s Grohmann Engineering, which develops automated manufacturing systems for batteries and fuel cells, as the California-based company seeks to expand its production more than sixfold by 2018.

Unlisted Grohmann Engineering, based in Pruem, Germany, helped Tesla rivals Daimler  and BMW build production facilities for electric car batteries.

Tesla is seeking to raise its global manufacturing capacity to 500,000 vehicles in 2018 from an expected production rate of about 80,000 this year. Its main production facility is in Fremont, California.

“To date, we have increased the production rate at our Fremont Factory by 400 percent in four years, and we expect this acquisition to accelerate that growth rate,” Tesla said in a blogpost.

Following the acquisition, which still needs to be approved by the cartel authorities in Germany, several elements of Tesla’s automated manufacturing systems will be designed and produced in Pruem, close to Germany’s border with the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

The deal, whose financial terms were not disclosed, is expected to add over 1,000 engineering and skilled technician jobs in Germany over the next two years Tesla said in its blog. Grohmann currently has around 700 employees.

Tesla agreed on Sunday to buy a 74.9 percent stake from company founder and majority owner Klaus Grohmann, and a further 25.1 percent stake belonging to private equity firm Deutsche Beteiligungs AG (DBAG), DBAG said in a statement on Tuesday.

DBAG said it expected to earn in the mid single-digit million euro range by selling its stake in Grohmann and that Grohmann had revenues of 123 million euros ($136 million) in 2015.

DBAG said Grohmann had developed production lines for battery cells and batteries for “numerous” German and international automobile manufacturers. Grohmann was also specialized in the industrial production of fuel cells, DBAG said, and was active in the electronic and semiconductor industries as well as the biotechnology and medical technology sectors.

Grohmann Engineering will be renamed Tesla Grohmann Automation after the deal and will serve as the initial base for Tesla Advanced Automation Germany with other locations to follow, Tesla said.

LG Wants In On U.S. Home Battery Market

October 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Consumer Electronics

lg-logo-150x150LG Chem Ltd, the world’s largest automotive battery manufacturer, will debut in the fledgling U.S. market for home energy storage through a partnership with rooftop solar company Sunrun Inc, the companies said on Wednesday.

The move will put LG in direct competition with electric car maker Tesla Motors Inc, which unveiled its own home battery packs, called Powerwalls, last year. Sunrun has been using Tesla batteries in its home storage systems in Hawaii since earlier this year, and this deal will add LG to its list of suppliers.

Financial terms were not disclosed. The agreement is not exclusive to either party, Sunrun said.

“Tesla makes all the headlines, but LG manufactures most of the lithium ion batteries,” Sunrun Executive Chairman Ed Fenster said in an interview. LG’s entry into the market will help bring down battery prices and help them make economic sense for more households, he added.

The deal comes as Tesla is planning to buy Sunrun’s bigger rival, SolarCity Corp, as part of its bid to sell a fossil fuel-free lifestyle in which people can have solar panels on their roofs generating electricity to power their homes, charge home battery packs and recharge their electric car batteries.

Home battery systems allow customers to store solar power generated during the day for use after sunset. Eventually, as utilities move to charging higher rates for power used in the evening, when demand is greatest, the batteries could bring customers significant savings. Battery packs can also serve as a backup power source in case of an outage.

Sunrun currently offers batteries with its solar installations only in Hawaii, where sky-high power prices make such systems economically attractive. The batteries have enabled many residents there to supply all their own electricity needs without relying on the grid.

Most of Sunrun’s battery systems are deployed through leases or power purchase agreements, which allow consumers to use the technology by paying a monthly fee and avoiding a large upfront cost.

In addition to Sunrun customers, LG Chem’s batteries will be available to the entire solar industry through AEE Solar, Sunrun’s solar products distribution arm.

Tesla To Get Into Ride-sharing Business

October 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

tesla-motors-logo-150x150Tesla Motors Inc has plans to introduce a ride share services program and will announce details next year, the luxury electric vehicle maker said on its website, a service first outlined by Chief Executive Elon Musk in his master plan in July.

News of the Tesla Network was in a disclaimer about the self-driving functionality on new Model S vehicles. Musk said last week Tesla is building new vehicles with the necessary hardware to eventually enable full autonomy, although the software is not yet ready.

“Please note that using a self-driving Tesla for car sharing and ride hailing for friends and family is fine, but doing so for revenue purposes will only be permissible on the Tesla Network, details of which will be released next year,” read the disclaimer.

Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for more detail.

Car makers have rushed to invest in so-called mobility services, hoping to capture the potential trillions of dollars in revenue from selling both vehicles and such on-demand services, while carving out a stake in the industry dominated by Uber.

Barclays analyst Brian Johnson wrote in a note to investors on Thursday that although a Tesla Network could “excite the market” over its potential earnings stream, it was a costly proposition.

“While we think ride-sharing/hailing is the future of mass-market mobility, we have some financial concerns with the idea of an OEM-owned fleet,” Johnson wrote.

Venture capitalists and corporate investors had poured nearly $28 billion into the ride services sector in the past decade as of June, according to a Reuters analysis.

General Motors has made the biggest bet, investing $500 million in Lyft in January. GM’s upcoming electric Chevrolet Bolt was designed expressly with car sharing in mind, executives have told Reuters.

Money-losing Tesla lacks the deep pockets of GM, and ride services companies like Uber and Lyft burn billions of dollars in price wars to secure regional dominance, as occurred with Uber in China before it ceded to local rival Didi Chuxing.

In his “Master Plan, Part Deux” in July, Musk outlined a system in which a Tesla owner could add a car to a shared Tesla fleet using a phone app, allowing it to “generate income for you” and lower the cost of ownership.

Musk said that in cities where car ownership is lower, Tesla would operate its own fleet.

Tesla And Panasonic Join Forces On Solar Cell Production

October 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Around The Net

tesla-powerwall-150x150Elon Musk’s Tesla Motors said it would join forces with Japan’s Panasonic Corp to mass produce solar cells and modules in New York.

Under the agreement, which is a non-binding letter of intent, Tesla said it will use the cells and modules in a solar energy system that will work seamlessly with its energy storage products Powerwall and Powerpack.

The Japanese company is already working with the U.S. automaker to supply batteries for the Model 3, its first mass-market car.

Panasonic is expected to begin production at the Buffalo facility in 2017 and Tesla intends to provide a long-term purchase commitment for those cells, Tesla said in a statement, adding the agreement is contingent on shareholders’ approval of its acquisition of SolarCity.

Last week Tesla and SolarCity Corp shareholders agreed to vote on the proposed merger on Nov. 17, and the automaker said it would provide plans for the combined company ahead of the vote.

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